Early involvement in charity makes children more likely to give again

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Early involvement in charity makes children more likely to give again Tagged with: Giving/Philanthropy Research / statistics Volunteering About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  22 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img The NOP survey was conducted between September and October 2003, and surveyed 1989students.G-Week will take place from 26 June – 2 July 2004 in England and Wales and 1 – 7 June 2004 in N.Ireland and Scotland. Young people are more likely to be long-term givers when they get involved in charity at an early age, according to a survey conducted by Giving Nation.Giving Nation, the independent initiative working with secondary schools to get moreof the UK’s youth involved in charities, found that over three quarters of pupils surveyed had given to charity the last time they were asked. However, those who took part in Giving Nation’s first ‘G-Week’ (Giving Week) in July 2003, were 30% more likely to see themselves as future givers. The survey revealed that girls are significantly more likely to give than boys, with mothers being identified as the person most likely to be seen giving time or money to charity. Over half of pupils thatparticipated in G-Week in 2003 stated that by taking part they were made more aware of charities’ work and had increased confidence in the role that charities play in society, including how donations are spent. Seventy per cent agreed that “It’s cool to volunteer and help people.” Advertisement Howard Lake | 5 April 2004 | Newslast_img read more

HZJZ: Recommendation for work / stay on yachts, boats and other vessels during the epidemic COVID-19

first_imgPassenger records.  Crew health monitoring by daily temperature measurement.  The Croatian Institute of Public Health published recommendations for work / stay on yachts, boats and other vessels during the COVID-19 epidemic. Other recommendations as well as the procedure in case of symptoms indicative of COVID-19 can be found in the appendix. It is recommended that vessel personnel keep records of passenger contacts and passenger entries and exits, so that in case of detection of a sick person on board, territorially competent epidemiologists can identify and inform the patient’s contacts as soon as possible and implement measures to prevent further spread of infection. Before starting work, all crew members must measure their temperature in the morning and will not start working if it is higher than 37,2oC and / or they have respiratory problems. In case of fever and / or respiratory problems with or without fever, employees will contact the employer and the competent family doctor by phone and will not start working until the cause of respiratory disorders or fever is determined. Attachment: HZJZ: Recommendation for work / stay on yachts, boats and other vessels during the epidemic COVID-19last_img read more