Champlain College to confer honorary degrees on Lola Aiken and Marc vanderHeyden

first_imgBURLINGTON, Vt.–Champlain College will confer honorary degrees on two prominent Vermont residents at its 129th Commencement on May 5, 2007. The Board of Trustees of Champlain College selected retiring Saint Michael’s College President Marc A. vanderHeyden and Champlain College Trustee Emeritus Lola P. Aiken for this honor.Aiken and vanderHeyden will be awarded honorary doctoral degrees from the private, professionally focused college. Additionally, vanderHeyden will deliver the Commencement Address at Champlain College’s ceremony.”These two individuals come from very different backgrounds, but they both have created positive changes in Vermont’s cultural, historical and educational landscapes,” said Champlain College President David F. Finney. “At Commencement time, we’re pleased to honor their many contributions while reminding our graduates that they also have the power to make indelible marks on their communities and the world.”Lola Pierotti AikenLola Pierotti Aiken of Montpelier is celebrated as an unwavering advocate for Vermont’s educational, historical and community organizations. Born in Vermont’s capital city, the daughter of a stonecutter who emigrated from Italy, Aiken would land a job working for George Aiken in 1941 in his US Senate campaign office, before moving to work in his Congressional office in Washington.She earned her way to the top staff job where she proved herself a catalyst – using her connections in Vermont and Washington to help advance the Senator’s efforts on behalf of Vermonters. Twenty-five years after joining the Senator’s team, she would marry him and continue to work by his side without pay. Over three decades in the capital, Aiken rubbed elbows with six presidents, first ladies and many senators, while today she remains a loyal supporter of the Senator’s legacy. Vermont political candidates still seek her out today for endorsements at campaign time.As a stateswoman and dedicated community servant, Aiken’s energy and “we-can-do-it” attitude is legendary across Vermont. She’s served on the board of directors of UVM’s George B. Aiken Lecture Series, The Vermont Historical Society, Calvin Coolidge Foundation, Ethan Allen Homestead, Rockingham Meeting House and Judicial Conduct Board. Her service has also reached to Central Vermont Home Health and Hospice and the New England Culinary Institute Scholarship Committee. She’s a longtime, active member of the Friends of the Statehouse – where her husband served as Governor for four years prior to becoming a Senator. Aiken’s recent awards include the 2005 Governor’s Award for Outstanding Community Service Vermont Lifetime Achievement Award. She has an honorary degree from UVM and won Norwich University’s Board of Fellow’s Medallion Award in 2002.At Champlain College, Aiken Hall – the former Westervelt home built in 1885, was named in honor of Lola Aiken because of her longtime dedication to Champlain students and programs. She served as a college trustee for the 18 years prior to 1995 and she was an advocate for Champlain’s many student life programs and the Single Parents Program, which has been nationally recognized for supporting single parents as they juggle family and educational responsibilities. Aiken also provided leadership for capital campaigns to build a campus center and high-tech library at Champlain College.Aiken once told former Champlain College President Robert Skiff that she loved one of his sayings: “If you stand still, you lose ground.” Many would agree that Lola Aiken has also lived by these words.Dr. Marc A. vanderHeydenDr. Marc A. vanderHeyden has served as president of Saint Michael’s College in Colchester for 11 years and will step down in June 2007. As the 15th president of the liberal arts Catholic college, the historian has brought intelligence, compassion, creativity and extraordinary development to the institution.A seasoned educator who was born in Ghent, Belgium, vanderHeyden is fluent in three languages and has a working knowledge of five more. Colleagues say he has an acute sense of the need for globally informed education that goes beyond one’s own borders. St. Michael’s trustees have noted that his enduring and primary focus on students and the quality of their educational experience was clear from the moment he set foot on campus.During vanderHeyden’s tenure, Saint Michael’s College strengthened its academic profile, including obtaining an invitation to create a Phi Beta Kappa honor society chapter on campus – one of only 270 colleges and universities nationwide have been invited to do so. vanderHeyden oversaw the completion of a $52 million campaign and constructed important new facilities while enhancing the college’s technology infrastructure.vanderHeyden has involved all of the college’s constituencies in developing a shared vision of Saint Michael’s College. He linked the college to national and international education organizations, led the institution in exploring the importance of its Catholic heritage, and created lasting ties to the arts community.vanderHeyden and his wife, Dana, have rooted Saint Michael’s in Vermont’s cultural community through significant support and collaboration with many organizations. The Lane Series now collaborates with Saint Michael’s on arts presentations nearly every year, the Flynn Theater works with the college in an arts-education graduate program, the Church Street Fire House Gallery recognizes Saint Michael’s as a supporter of several exhibits annually, the Fleming Museum provides free access to Saint Michael’s students and The Vermont Youth Orchestra has a beautiful new home in the Elley-Long Music Center at Saint Michael’s College. During vanderHeyden’s tenure, the college also initiated the artist-in-residence summer program to bring young talent to campus and to build a significant contemporary art collection on campus.As vanderHeyden moved Saint Michael’s College forward, he has also brought his talents to several state and regional organizations. He currently serves on the boards the Association of Vermont Independent Colleges, Eleanor Roosevelt Center at Val-Kill, Green Mountain Power, New England Board of Higher Education, Vermont Business Roundtable, Vermont Campus Compact, Vermont Health Foundation and Vermont Higher Education Council. The diversity of organizations attests to vanderHeyden’s versatility and leadership skills, which have been invaluable to the community at large.last_img read more

Other precautions useful as vaccine distribution will take time

first_imgHis comments came one day after biotech company Moderna announced that trials show its vaccine is more than 94% effective in preventing Covid-19. Pfizer last week said its vaccine is more than 90% effective.Wong, who is also the country’s education minister, said the developments were positive, but there’s still “a long way to go” before the safety and efficacy of the vaccines are ensured. They will then need to be distributed and it will take time for a sufficient number of people to be vaccinated, he added. We really need all of these to come together – vaccines, testing, safe distancing, contact tracing.- Advertisement – People wearing face masks as a precaution walking along Orchard Road, a famous shopping district in Singapore.Maverick Asio | SOPA Images | LightRocket | Getty Images Lawrence WongSingapore’s minister for education Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests are currently considered the most accurate in detecting coronavirus infections, but can take a long time to return results.“Developing new rapid tests that are cheaper, simpler, easier to administer, that’s very important to ensure more comprehensive testing,” said Wong.He added that simple precautions such as wearing masks, keeping social gatherings small and maintaining safe distances are “highly effective” in keeping the infection under control.“We really need all of these to come together – vaccines, testing, safe distancing, contact tracing,” he said.Third phase of reopeningAsked when Singapore would enter the third stage of its reopening, the minister said the conditions have to be right.“This is like … a fire that has just been put out. The embers are still around, and it only takes a small spark to get the fire raging again,” he said. SINGAPORE – A coronavirus vaccine won’t be the silver bullet to end the pandemic, the co-chair of Singapore’s Covid-19 task force said this week despite “promising” news from pharmaceutical companies.“We’re certainly encouraged by it, it’s very promising, but I would say also that the vaccine is not a silver bullet to end the pandemic,” Lawrence Wong told “Squawk Box Asia” on Tuesday. “We should not put all our eggs into the vaccine basket.”- Advertisement – Singapore went into a partial lockdown in April and has reopened its economy in phases since June. Phase two started in mid-June.“When can we get to phase three? I’ve emphasized this, that it’s not about rushing into phase three, but making sure that we do it right,” Wong said.Singapore is likely to allow bigger social gatherings and increase capacity limits for public venues such as museums in the next step of reopening.The minister outlined three factors that need to be in place and where the country stands:Effective testing capabilities“On testing metrics, we are doing quite well,” Wong said. The country has reached its target capacity of 40,000 tests a day and is continuing to deploy both PCR tests and rapid antigen tests.Continued vigilance in the community “For the large part, I think we’re doing well,” the minister said, noting that there are occasional cases of people breaching the rules. He added that this is an ongoing measure of Singapore’s “continued cooperation and compliance.”Contact tracing abilitiesAround 50% of the population has downloaded the TraceTogether app or is using a token that allows Singapore to identify people who have been in close contact with confirmed coronavirus cases. “We aim to get that to around 70% or higher, and we think we can get there by the end of the year,” Wong said. “Perhaps it will take a bit longer, but that’s the current timeframe that we’re working on.”“We will do our darndest to go through phase 3, resume activities progressively without having to enter into another circuit breaker or lockdown,” he said. “I don’t think anyone wants to go through that again.” “We should not look only at vaccines,” he said. “We really need all the tools at our disposal, and that includes testing – having more effective ways of testing beyond the ‘gold standard’ of the PCR test.”- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more