Leblond back for Contender clash

first_imgDave Leblond, the Canadian boxer who lost by split decision to Jamaica’s Tsetsi Davis, returns to the Wray & Nephew 2017 junior middleweight series tonight, to fight Jamaica’s Nico Yeyo, because of a twist of fate.Yeyo was scheduled to meet another Canadian, Ryan Wagner, but Wagner is reported to have failed a medical examination last week and is not eligible to fight tonight. The bout, which will be over five rounds is scheduled to start at 9:30 p.m. and will be broadcast on Television Jamaica.Because of the outpouring of support for Leblond following his close loss, the promoters decided to bring him back into the series, and he declared on his return to Jamaica on the weekend, that he is “a very happy man”. Leblond lost to Davis by split decision, and although it was accepted that the fight was a very close one, he filed an appeal with the Jamaica Boxing Board. The appeal was, however, thrown out.PROFESSIONALDEBUTTonight, in the sixth week of competition, he goes against a Jamaican boxer who is making his professional debut, but has declared himself yesterday, as being “ready for the challenge”. When Yeyo heard that Leblond was to be his opponent, he was concerned that “a fighter who lost is returning” but word is that he has accepted the fact that it is going to happen, and is preparing himself mentally for the fight.Leblond, whose record is one win and one loss, showed in his fight against Davis that he is a good all-round boxer, and his trainer, Patrice Trudeau, said after the Davis fight that “it did him a world of good, and put him in good stead for his next fight”, which he said then was scheduled for June. This is now happening, however, and they were “pretty confident of victory” yesterday.Yeyo has had about 25 amateur fights, and on his night, he can perform brilliantly. One never knows what to expect from him, however, so one will have to wait to see which of his many facets will be on display tonight. It should be a keenly contested affair.In the bouts that precede the professional bouts, two amateur boxers from Canada, welterweight Joshua Frazer and middleweight Jake Daoust, are scheduled to go against Jamaican opponents.last_img read more

We Na Here To Make Justice And Accountability Lazy-No More September 9 Yah!

first_imgToday is September 9, 2019. It was on this date, 29 years ago, that President Samuel Kanyon Doe was captured at the Freeport of Monrovia and later died at the hands of his captors in what would prove to be tumultuous but watershed moments in Liberian history. Time, it is said, has wings; it flies. This common saying is true now as it was yesterday and will be tomorrow.Except for a few people maybe, mainly relatives, friends and close associates, of the late Liberian President, Samuel K. Doe, not many Liberians, especially the youth, can recall that it was on this date, September 9, 1990, that President Doe was seized at the Freeport of Monrovia by self-styled Field Marshall Prince Johnson, then leader of the breakaway faction of the National Patriotic Front of Liberia (NPFL) known as the Independent National Patriotic Front of Liberia(INPFL) and taken to his Caldwell base.History recalls that the besieged President Doe had earlier signed a cooperation pact with Prince Johnson to ward off  attacking forces of the Charles Taylor-led NPFL who had by July 30,1990 virtually encircled the city of Monrovia and was attacking on all fronts. The late President had gone to the Freeport, according to some accounts, to inquire from the Force Commander of the West African Peacekeeping force (ECOMOG) why he had not come to pay his respects.Shortly after his arrival at the Freeport in Monrovia with a host of close associates in tow, President Doe was pounced upon, seized and taken to Prince Johnson’s Caldwell base where he was tortured in the full glare of television cameras and later fatally succumbed to his wounds. Now, twenty-nine (29) years later today, only a handful of people perhaps, mainly those in Monrovia at the time, would recall this date and the momentous events of that day.President Doe was indeed a powerful ruler, backed by a 7,000-strong army with a strong composition of his ethnic kinsmen and was officered mainly by them following several purges that deprived the army of its core leadership structure, a defect which would have telling effects on its performance on the battlefield. Moreover, the army had been newly outfitted and stocked with an array of weapons, including heavy artillery, Katyusha multiple rocket launchers which had been purchased from Romania.With such an array of weapons, it was widely perceived that Doe was invincible and perhaps he did believe he was indeed invincible. That belief or perception was, however, shattered when a trussed-up Doe was captured on video, wounded and, with tears in his eyes, pleading with his nemesis, Prince Johnson, for mercy which was never forthcoming. Doe later died and was buried but his remains were later exhumed by Prince Johnson and reinterred later at an undisclosed location.The 14-year period of bloodletting which followed President Doe’s death was driven in part by longings for revenge but for the most part driven by lust for power and the spoils which come along with it. The very heavy costs (250,000 deaths) imposed on the civilian population by those opting for regime change through a violent approach should serve to remind the country’s political class of the inherent dangers involved in flirting with violence as a tool of political control.But more to that, this date, September 9, should serve to remind all Liberians of the urgent need to combat impunity through accountability. Why? It is because the possibility that such a scenario could repeat itself is not far-fetched, given rising social discontent, especially in view of the spate of mindless political violence perpetrated by CDC supporters, to which this nation has borne witness in recent times and which has gone virtually with impunity.Accountability, therefore, is not only right and just but is befitting and potentially beneficial to social stability and harmony. This was the issue highlighted by Prince Johnson in a very bizarre way in 1990 before a trussed-up and tearful President Doe begging for mercy and relief when Prince Johnson asked, “What happened to the people’s money?”But of course, answers to that question were never-forth coming but strangely, years later, it would find resonance in what was dubbed the “Bring Back Our Money” public manifestation in 2018, which followed in the wake of revelations that 16 billion Liberian dollar banknotes had gone missing from the Central Bank.Today, the country appears dangerously perched at the brink of conflict, induced by the lack of accountability that is reinforced by a culture of impunity in the government of President George M. Weah.  And public officials are conducting themselves in ways that suggest they are completely oblivious to the lessons which should have been learnt from the watershed moments of that fateful day of September 9, 1990.And 29 years later it appears as though the nation is retracing its steps as economic conditions continue to worsen in the face of profligacy and ostentatious display of grandeur by a new breed of “nouveaux riches” who pride and see themselves as the “noblesse obliges” of our times as seen by their effusive displays of false generosity.President Weah’s pronouncements reiterating his commitment to exercising strong political will in dealing with the recommendations emanating from the Economic Dialogue is commendable, though meaningless in the absence of concrete action to deal with corruption. In this regard, the current initiative undertaken to retrieve stolen assets is commendable and should be encouraged.The world is waiting, the world is watching and for the Liberian people, da it deh; we na here to make Justice and Accountability lazy. We moh na try it sef! No More September 9 yah!Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Cheney names replacements for Libby

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) – Vice President Dick Cheney, moving swiftly to replace an indicted aide, named attorney David Addington as his chief of staff and John Hannah as his national security adviser on Monday. Some Republicans suggested that President Bush should overhaul his own White House staff and bring in fresh advisers. Both jobs that Cheney filled had been handled by one person: I. Lewis Libby, who resigned Friday when he was indicted on perjury and other charges in a 22-month investigation of the unmasking of an undercover CIA officer. Libby faces his first court appearance Thursday before U.S. District Judge Reggie Walton. Addington has been Cheney’s counsel and Hannah has been his deputy national security adviser. White House press secretary Scott McClellan played down the idea of major changes on Bush’s staff, saying there had been no discussion of that beyond the usual vacancies that occur. McClellan also brushed off Democrats’ calls for Bush to apologize for the actions by administration officials in revealing the name of the CIA officer, Valerie Plame, and for presidential adviser Karl Rove to resign. McClellan said he did not want to make any statements that jeopardized Libby’s right to a fair and impartial trial. He was repeatedly asked to acknowledge that he was wrong in 2003 when he denied that Rove or Libby were involved in disclosing the identity of Plame. He said he would not comment during the ongoing legal proceedings. The Senate Democratic leader, Harry Reid, said Sunday that Rove should resign because of his role in exposing an undercover CIA officer. Rove has not been charged, but he continues to be investigated in the CIA leaks case. Reid said he was disappointed that Bush and Cheney responded to the indictment by praising Libby – known around Washington as “Scooter” – and suggested they should apologize for the leak that revealed Plame’s identity. “First of all, the vice president issues this very terse statement praising Libby for all the great things he’s done,” Reid said. “Then we have the president come on camera a few minutes later calling him Scooter and what a great patriot he is. “There has not been an apology to the American people for this obvious problem in the White House,” Reid, D-Nev., told ABC’s “This Week.” Democrats appearing on Sunday talk shows portrayed Libby’s indictment as one of many serious problems surrounding the White House and one of several allegations raising questions about Republican ethics. Republicans repeatedly said the charges have been made against only one individual and that Libby should be presumed innocent until proven guilty. Public opinion appears to be running against Bush. Almost half the public, 46 percent, say the level of ethics and honesty in the federal government has fallen with Bush as president, according to an ABC News-Washington Post poll. That’s three times the number who say ethics and honesty have risen during that time. Republican Sen. Trent Lott of Mississippi said Bush should be on the lookout for “new blood, new energy, qualified staff, new people in administration.” He said poor advice may have even contributed to the failed nomination of Harriet Miers to the Supreme Court. A grand jury charged Libby on Friday with five felonies alleging obstruction of justice, perjury to a grand jury and making false statements to FBI agents. If convicted, he could face a maximum of 30 years in prison and $1.25 million in fines. Libby was not charged with the crime that the grand jury was created to investigate – specifically, who leaked the name of Plame to reporters in 2003. Libby and Rove were named by reporters brought before the grand jury, but it was unclear whether they knew that she was a covert agent. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more