New Research Suggests Blacks Have Predisposition to Alcoholism

first_imgAs the nation kicks off Alcohol Awareness Month, new research has come to light. It suggests that in addition to the stigma associated with alcoholism, African Americans suffer from a genetic predisposition to greater negative effects of alcohol consumption.Tamika Zapolski, assistant professor of psychology in the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), recently examined a paradox in African-American drinking. She found that despite African Americans reporting an initiation to drinking at an older age, lower rates of use, and lower levels of use in nearly all age groups, they still encountered higher levels of problems related to alcohol when compared to whites.“So much research has compared drinking habits and effects between African Americans and European Americans, but no one is truly investigating the reasons,” Zapolski said. “Understanding the reasons for these differences can ultimately improve diagnoses and intervention plans.”Zapolski posits that genetic, historical, and sociocultural factors, including cultural norms with religious beliefs and societal disapproval, make African Americans more likely to abstain from drinking and drink less than other groups. So why do Blacks encounter more negative consequences and greater risks for alcoholism or other alcohol problems?According to Zapolski, and others including Drs. Denise M. Scott and Robert E. Taylor, there exists a number of genetic variants of ADH and ALDH genes in African Americans that account for a higher rate of alcohol metabolism. This means that liquor breaks down quicker, is more potent, and has a greater effect in smaller amounts in their consumption. It also means a reduced likelihood of a family history of alcoholism and a greater likelihood of alcohol related chronic conditions such as cirrhosis.“In plain English, the data is saying that liquor is poison to some of our bodies, just like ingesting arsenic,” said Wendell Carby, a recovering alcoholic with 20 years’ sobriety. “I took my first drink as a freshman in college and was a drunk before the semester ended. It was like kryptonite to my body, but I couldn’t stop drinking even after it started making me ill.”Carby said the addiction was so swift and all-encompassing – creating damage in his nerves, stomach, and liver – that he had little time to brace himself for the financial difficulties and failed relationships that lay ahead. It was only when he began experiencing blackouts that Carby sought help.With growing concern over the prevalence of heavy drinking among African-American youth, Carby believes national campaigns should focus more attention on steering young adults away from alcohol. The rate of binge drinking (drinking five or more drinks on a single occasion for men) among African Americans ages 12 and up was 20.1 percent – compared with the national average of 22.9 percent. Similarly, African Americans aged 12 to 20 in 2013 reported past-month alcohol use at a rate of 17.8 percent, compared with the national average of 22.7 percent.“Our young people need to understand that alcohol is dangerous at any level because some of us are wired to become drunks and have to fight ‘putting the bottle down’ for the rest of our lives. The message should be the same as it was with crack in the ‘90s, ‘Just say no,’” Carby said.Alcohol intoxication can be harmful or risky for a variety of reasons: impaired brain function resulting in poor judgment, reduced reaction time, a loss of balance, coordination, motor skills, or slurred speech, as well as increased risk of certain cancers, stroke, and liver diseases (e.g., cirrhosis).last_img read more

Ward 8 Dems Dont Endorse in Chairman AtLarge Race

first_imgBy James Wright, Special to the AFRO, jwright@afro.comThe chairman of the D.C. Council, and one of the at-large council members, didn’t receive an endorsement from one of the most influential political organizations in the District of Columbia.On April 21, the Ward 8 Democrats held their endorsement meeting for the positions of the District Attorney General, chairman of the D.C. Council, and the Democratic at-large seat on the council at the D.C. Vehicle for Hire Department in the ward. Ward 8 Democratic voters were eligible to cast ballots for the three positions and there were members of the D.C. Democratic State Committee members from other wards to police the process and see that it ran smoothly.Anita Bonds is running for re-election as a Democratic at-large council member. (AFRO File Photo)The voting took place from 12-2 p.m.The endorsements are for the June 19 Democratic primary. The winner of the Democratic primary for the three positions are favorites to win the Nov. 6 general election because the city is 74 percent Democratic, according to D.C. Board of Elections statistics.For a candidate to receive an endorsement from the Ward 8 Democrats, they needed to get 60 percent of the votes that were cast. In this instance, a candidate would have had to get 46 votes out of the 78 cast.D.C. Council member Anita Bonds (D-At Large) is running for re-election to a second full term. Bonds is running against Ward 8 activist Aaron Holmes, environmental leader Jeremiah Lowery and real estate professional Marcus Goodwin in the June 19 Democratic Party primary.Bonds got 33 votes, 13 short of the endorsement while Holmes got 21, Goodwin received 12 and Lowery had eight. Despite not getting the Ward 8 Democrats nod, Bonds told the AFRO she was satisfied with the result.“I am pleased that I came and participated,” she said. “I would note that one of my opponents came from this ward and I got more votes than he did.”WHO IS SHE TALKING ABOUT?Goodwin credited the leadership of the Ward 8 Democrats for having an open process. “The result was nothing profound to me but I take my hat off to the Ward 8 Democrats for giving the candidates a fair opportunity,” he said to the AFRO. Goodwin noted that the late Marion Barry, the four-term mayor and elected four times to represent the ward on the D.C. Council, would have supported Bonds and she would have gotten the endorsement outright because of his influence.During the council candidates’ forum that took place during the voting, all agreed that more affordable housing is needed in the District and the educational system is due for major improvements. They also agreed that the District should have a state-of the art hospital in its East End and not a jail, whether it is publicly or privately financed.In the chairman’s race, D.C. Council Chair Phil Mendelson came up three votes shy of winning the endorsement. However, there are three provisional ballots that need to be counted and they have the potential to earn the chairman the endorsement.Former D.C. Fiscal Policy Institute leader Ed Lazere had 20 votes to perennial candidate Calvin Gurley, the only African American in the race, who got eight. District Attorney General Karl Racine has no opponent in the Democratic primary and easily got past the 60 percent threshold.last_img read more