Gender relations club aims to promote discussion

first_imgJunior Caylin McCallick saw a lack of conversation between different genders at Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame and decided to found the Justice Education Gender Relations Group (JEGRG) in order to spark and facilitate that conversation.“I realized that I had no outlets of engaging in academic conversation with different genders,” McCallick said. “I just want to talk to people. I want to engage in higher-level discussion about the issues we face — and I want to do it in an environment that’s void of solo cups and Tinder.”According to McCallick, the group, which she is doing as an independent academic study project, will meet once per week for four weeks. She said it will have a loose structure in hopes of creating open conversations about subjects varying from how different genders interact to sex positivity to DomerFest.“This group is my way of finding people with similar feelings who want to have a serious, safe dialogue about gender,” McCallick said. “What am I blind to? What do you know that I should know too?”McCallick said the main focus of the group is creating a space in which dialogue of this type can occur.“I realized that I didn’t really know how to communicate with opposite genders because on this campus mostly I just speak with females,” McCallick said. “I realized that was a common problem because I saw people … in different social situations. We’re all educated people, and yet when we meet each other, it becomes this dumb game. … I wanted to figure out why that is and delve deeper in the discrepancies between genders.”McCallick said she wants to create a continuous conversation in which women can speak with men on a professional level in addition to romantic or social contex in order to find the deeper meaning behind certain ideas about other genders.“I feel like I judge very quickly, especially men,” McCallick said. “I don’t know where that comes from in my soul. I just want to talk to someone face-to-face and figure out why I am having this defensive against you and figure out what we can do about it, so that we both can rise because there’s this strange social stigma and I don’t know where it comes from.”According to McCallick, the group will give members the opportunity to engage with and learn the perspectives of people different from them. The group’s dynamic will strengthen communication skills, a tool that will be beneficial later in life, she said.“I think it’s important because [Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s are] both institutions of higher learning,” McCallick said. “We can benefit from representing our schools in the business world by knowing how to speak with someone appropriately and knowing what the other side of the issue is.”McCallick estimates the group will have 10 female-identifying members and 10-male identifying members, but it is open to people who identify as any gender.“I want it to be balanced among genders,” McCallick said. “I’m not just saying male and female — I want all genders. I want the balance because I don’t want any one to take control more than the other. … We can get really defensive, and the biggest thing is it has to be a safe environment to say things. You don’t want to get people on the defensive.”The group will begin meeting after spring break. For more information on how to join, email McCallick at cmccal01@saintmarys.eduTags: Caylin McCallick, gender relations, Justice Education Gender Relations Group, saint mary’s, SMClast_img read more

First offshore wind tender in India coming soon, official says

first_imgFirst offshore wind tender in India coming soon, official says FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Recharge News:India is due to announce its first offshore wind tender for a 1GW flagship project off Gujarat in October or November, a senior energy official in the state tells Recharge.The Solar Energy Corporation of India, a state-owned company under the auspices of the national Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, has been tasked with releasing the auction plan, which follows an expressions of interest process in June.Raj Gopal, the principal secretary in Gujarat’s energy department, told Recharge that the government has no finishing timeline set for the 1GW development. “In the end, it depends on the progress of the tender,” he said.Gujarat’s 1GW offshore wind project serves as India’s opening gambit in its bid to install 5GW of offshore wind by 2022 and 30GW by 2030, with total wind capacity targets set at 60GW and 140GW by those dates.Since the ambitious plan was announced in December, it has triggered both excitement and scepticism globally. “I would consider it an achievement if the 1GW (Gujarat project) could be built,” said Steve Sawyer, secretary-general of the Global Wind Energy Council, citing the country’s lack of infrastructure as a clear challenge.India’s wind power price, Gopal said, is another key stumbling block for the country’s offshore wind ambition. Wind power prices in India have been subject to competitive bidding since 2017. The most recent wind power bid in Gujarat state came in at a price of 2,650 rupees ($36.50) per MWh.More: India’s first 1GW offshore wind tender to be announced shortlylast_img read more

Credit union investments in 2016: Many happy returns?

first_img 11SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr The key question about the U.S. economy entering 2016 is whether China and other emerging economies will export their woes to the U.S. It’s a reasonable question because they generate a larger percent of global gross domestic product (GDP) than ever before.But first, a review of 2015.By the second quarter of 2015, it seemed clear the U.S. stock market’s higher-than-average valuations left it vulnerable to a correction.Lofty valuations don’t generally trigger a selloff by themselves—they often need a catalyst, like, say, China abruptly devaluing its currency. That’s exactly what happened in August.In response to a steep decline in its own economy, China’s policy makers moved to shore up its capital markets and stimulate exports by devaluing its currency.Around the world, stock markets slid. When analysts see nations devalue their currency, they consider the tactic “hitting the panic button” because it is usually a last-resort attempt to rescue a declining economy. continue reading »last_img read more

Another antibody against diverse flu strains found

first_imgFeb 27, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – For the second time this week, scientists have reported the discovery of a human antibody that, at least in theory, could lead to development of a vaccine or drug effective against most types of influenza A, including the deadly H5N1 avian flu virus.A team from the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., and the Dutch company Crucell Holland BV describe the new antibody, called CR6261, in a report in Science. They write that the antibody recognizes a stable, or nonmutating, region of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein in the 1918 pandemic flu virus and a 2004 strain of the H5N1 virus.As it is described, the antibody targets the same general region of the HA protein as do the monoclonal antibodies described in the report published Feb 22: the stem or neck of the molecule, which sits on the surface of the virus and helps it bind to host cells. And like the earlier report, the new one says the antibody neutralizes the virus by blocking it from fusing with cells.”The antibody neutralizes the virus by blocking conformational rearrangements associated with membrane fusion,” the Science report states. “Identification of the CR6261 epitope [the HA site the antibody targets] provides a lead for the design of antivirals and takes a significant step towards the development of a durable and cross-protective ‘universal’ vaccine against influenza A,” it concludes.The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which provided funding for both studies released this week, said in a statement yesterday, “Taken together, these studies provide a blueprint for efforts to develop new antiviral drugs as well as a potential universal flu vaccine.”The scientists, with Damian C. Ekiert of Scripps as first author, write that they isolated CR6261 from a healthy, vaccinated person by mixing a serum sample with HA from an H5 virus. In a previously reported study, they found that CR6261 neutralized several influenza A subtypes, including H1, H2, H5, H6, H8, and H9. They also found that it protected mice from H1N1 and H5N1 viruses when administered up to 5 days after infection.To determine which part of the HA molecule the antibody targets and how it neutralizes the virus, the team studied the crystal structures of the antibody in combination with HAs from the 1918 H1N1 virus and a 2004 Vietnam strain of the H5N1 virus. They found that the antibody attaches to the base of the proteins rather than to the mushroom-shaped head—the portion targeted by existing flu vaccines.In further experiments, the scientists concluded that the antibody prevents HA from initiating the process of fusing the viral membrane with the host cell membrane. “CR6261 appears to neutralize the virus by stabilizing the pre-fusion state and preventing the pH-dependent fusion of viral and cellular membranes,” the report says.The researchers also analyzed more than 5,000 HA genetic sequences in a flu database in an effort to learn why certain flu subtypes, such as H3 and H7, are not neutralized by CR6261. They concluded that the masking of a certain site on the HA molecule by glycoproteins (glycosylation) is the probable reason. From this analysis, they concluded that the antibody probably can neutralize HAs from 12 of the 16 influenza A subtypes: H1, H2, H4-H6, H8, H9, H11-H14, and H16.The presence of the CR6261 epitope in a wide range of influenza viruses “suggests a critical role in membrane fusion,” indicating the possibility of using it to develop new antiviral drugs and a broadly protective vaccine, the researchers write.Experts who were not involved in the study said the latest findings are very similar to those reported earlier this week in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology.John Treanor, MD, a vaccine researcher and professor of microbiology and immunology at the University of Rochester in New York, called the idea of using the “fusion region” of HA to develop a vaccine interesting, though not entirely new. “It’s a long way to go between knowing you have an antibody that can recognize that region and making a vaccine,” he said.If the CR6261 target region were used to make a vaccine designed to induce the immune system to generate similar antibodies, immunogenicity could be a challenge, Treanor said. “Bear in mind that you don’t really make this antibody when you’re exposed [to flu viruses], or you don’t make much of it. So presumably you’d have to cook up some way of presenting the epitope in such a way as to make it immunogenic.”He said the findings certainly raise the possibility making CR6261 antibodies for use as a flu treatment. “I don’t have any doubt that we could do that. I will say that if the experience with palivizumab is any guide, you’d expect this type of passive antibody approach to be much more effective for prevention than for treatment.”Palivizumab is a human monoclonal antibody used to protect certain vulnerable children from serious infections with respiratory syncytial virus, he said.Dr. Richard Webby, a virologist, flu researcher, and associate member of the Department of Infectious Diseases at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, called the latest findings “great stuff.”Given that monoclonal antibodies are already used to treat certain diseases, the findings certainly point to a possibility of antibody-based therapies for flu, he said.”There are some limitations on the wider use of this approach, cost being the major one,” he said. “As production techniques improve and costs come down, it becomes a little bit more viable.”Webby added that antibody-based flu therapies have been “very, very effective” in animal models, surpassing other drugs. “So I absolutely think it’s an avenue that needs to be pursued aggressively.”As for the vaccine possibilities, he noted that a number of researchers are trying to make vaccines that induce immunity to more stable parts of influenza viruses, including sites on the HA, and have had mixed success. “There’s no doubt that if we want to produce a more cross-reactive vaccine against influenza, we have to understand more about these cross-reactive epitopes,” he said.Ekiert DC, Bhabba G, Elsliger, MA, et al. Antibody recognition of a highly conserved influenza virus epitope. Science 2009 Feb 26 (early online publication) [Abstract]See also: Feb 26 NIAID statementhttp://www.niaid.nih.gov/news/newsreleases/2009/Pages/flu_universal.aspxFeb 23 CIDRAP News story “Researchers find antibody that fights H5N1, seasonal flu strains”last_img read more

Video: The Black Stars fabulous comeback against Tunisia

first_imgWatch the Black Stars comeback against Tunisia in an international friendly on Sunday ahead of the start of the 2013 Africa Cup of Nations.last_img

Major League Baseball celebrates Jackie Robinson Day

first_imgJACKIE ROBINSON BOSTON (AP)—Everybody in uniform at the Tampa Bay Rays game Monday against the Red Sox at Fenway Park wore the number “42” as Major League Baseball celebrated its fifth annual Jackie Robinson Day.Fans will see more of that number on jerseys before the next couple of days are out. All the teams in action—there were eight night games on the schedule, in addition to the Rays-Red Sox day game—were asked to wear Robinson’s number on the 66th anniversary of his breaking the color barrier with the Brooklyn Dodgers. Teams that didn’t play on Monday planned to pay tribute Tuesday.The anniversary is drawing special attention this year with the release of the film “42” about Robinson, which went into wide release over the weekend.“We had a screening down in spring training,” Rays manager Joe Maddon said. “It was open to all of our personnel.”More than 100 players and other club employees watched the film at a theater in Port Charlotte, Fla., the Rays’ spring training site, “and I think a lot of guys walked away with a greater appreciation” of Robinson’s contribution,” Maddon said.Maddon said Robinson’s debut on April 15, 1947, helped lead to the broader civil rights movement.“I still don’t think people understand how much it plays into the Martin Luther King situation,” he said. “The revolution that occurred at that particular moment, it mattered. That had to happen first to set that whole thing up.“So when you’re talking about Jackie Robinson, I don’t think people realize the significance and really courage that went behind that, and in the movie it points that out—the courage to not fight back, to be able to win over that particular mind set to be able to make all of this work.”Red Sox manager John Farrell said baseball “reflects society in so many ways, whether it’s the color barriers being broken down. In our clubhouse you’ve got six or seven countries coming together. As a group of 25, you look to not only co-exist, but (recognize) the individuality of everyone in there.“Certainly, the Robinson family and, certainly, Jackie himself may be one of the most significant situations in our country’s history, breaking down segregation to the point of inclusion and I think that happens in the game today.”The movie “42” earned an estimated $27.3 million over the weekend, according to Warner Brothers, its distributor.The subject’s popularity extends to the sale of licensed sports merchandise. Fanatics.com, a large online retailer of those items, said sales of Jackie Robinson gear on its site since the season began increased by more than 1,000 percent over the same time period last year.last_img read more