Gravitational data from Dawn suggests dome on Ceres is made of volcanic

first_img Citation: Gravitational data from Dawn suggests dome on Ceres is made of volcanic mud (2019, June 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-gravitational-dawn-dome-ceres-volcanic.html © 2019 Science X Network This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Back in 2015, NASA’s Dawn space probe showed that there was a domed-shaped mountain approximately four kilometers high and seventeen kilometers wide—since named Ahuna Mons—rising from the surface of Ceres, a dwarf planet residing in our solar system’s asteroid belt. Initial inspection suggested volcanism; the dome-shape streaked mountain with salt on its slope looked reminiscent of volcanoes here on Earth, or even the icy domes seen on some of the solar system’s moons. But logic has suggested that the mechanics involved in creating volcanism on a dwarf planet would not work. Because of its small size, it would cool down and solidify, preventing any interior activity. But that logic appears not to apply to Ceres, the team found.The researchers noted evidence that the dome was created relatively recently, perhaps just a couple hundred million years ago—it has very few craters. Also, prior study of data from Dawn by another team led to the discovery that Ceres had a mantle loaded with fluids. To learn more, the team looked at gravity field maps built using data from Dawn. They found evidence of a plume extending from the mantle to the dome above it. A closer look suggested that the plume had at some point carried a mud-like mix of water, salt and other particles up into the area where the dome had formed.The researchers describe the plume as unlike any other documented to date, and thus is a novelty in the solar system. They also note that because of the composition of the plume, there is a possibility that Ceres’ mantle is still churning, pushing material up into the dome making it grow. Explore further Dawn snaps its best-yet image of dwarf planet cerescenter_img Journal information: Nature Geoscience More information: Ottaviano Ruesch et al. Slurry extrusion on Ceres from a convective mud-bearing mantle, Nature Geoscience (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41561-019-0378-7 Colocation of volcanic dome and isostatic gravity anomaly. a, A false-colour mosaic (R, 0.97 µm; G, 0.75 µm; B, 0.44 µm) of the region of Ahuna Mons from Dawn Framing Camera observations. The dome of Ahuna Mons is close to the centre of the mosaic, and its high-reflectance areas are steep flanks rich in carbonates and phyllosilicates. b, The isostatic anomaly represented with spherical harmonic degrees l= 5–14 and showing about 50–60 mGal at approximately the same coordinates as Ahuna Mons for the same area as a. Credit: Nature Geoscience (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41561-019-0378-7 An international team of researchers has found evidence that suggests the large dome found on the surface of the dwarf planet Ceres is made of slurry—a mix of salty brine and solid particles. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, the group describes their study of data from the Dawn spacecraft and what it revealed.last_img read more

Costa Rica defeats Jamaica 10 in friendly

first_imgRelated posts:2019 Gold Cup field finalized; Costa Rica will host two matches Legendary Radio Columbia sportscaster Mario McGregor dies at 59 Costa Rica’s Sele out of Korea U-20 World Cup Costa Rica to face Peru in Gold Cup warmup The Costa Rican soccer team defeated Jamaica 1-0 on Tuesday, in a match that served both squads in preparation for the Gold Cup.The Ticos beat the Reggae Boyz with the lone goal scored by right-back Keysher Fuller in the 29th minute.¡Gooool de #LaSele ! Jugadón y Fuller con la anotación. pic.twitter.com/XO0BtW0UNp— Teletica Deportes (@TeleticaTD7) March 27, 2019For La Sele, the result was a vindication before its home fans after an unexpected defeat last Friday in Guatemala.And perhaps it was due to that discouraging result that attendance at the National Stadium was far below capacity. Costa Rica started the match slowly, with missed passes and few dangerous actions with its only striker, Mayron George, who battled alone in the line of attack in the absence of midfield services.His most dangerous partner in the attack was Joel Campbell, the talented midfielder for the Mexican club Tigres, who became the game’s most prominent player. The Ticos took about 20 minutes to start controlling the pace of the game.Jamaica, with less control of the ball, had attacking opportunities thanks to the actions of the speedy and skilled Brian Brown and Maalique Foster. But Costa Rica opened the scoring in the 29th minute with a Fuller shot after a filtered pass from Campbell. The score allowed the locals to take confidence and begin to control the actions, with quick combinations of Ruiz, Campbell and Rónald Matarrita.Early in the second half, the Reggae Boyz tried to regain control of the match, but it rarely challenged goalkeeper Keylor Navas’ goal.Subsequently, the two coaches made numerous changes and Costa Rica coasted to victory. Lineups:Costa Rica: Keylor Navas – Keysher Fuller (Ian Smith, 72nd minute), Giancarlo González, Kendall Waston (Juan Pablo Vargas, 76), Francisco Calvo – Celso Borges, Allan Cruz (José Mora, 64), Bryan Ruiz (José Ortiz, 83), Joel Campbell (Ronaldo Araya, 76), Ronald Matarrita (Ariel Lassiter, 64) – Mayron George. DT: Gustavo MatosasJamaica: A. Knight (J. White, 61) – Michael Hector, Ladale Richie, Alvas Powell, Dever Orgill – Junior Flemmings, Maalique Foster (J. East, 61), Shaun Francis, Damion Lowe – Brian Brown, Kevon Lambert. DT: Theodore Whitmore This story was made possible thanks to The Tico Times 5% Club. If only 5 percent of our readers donated at least $5 a month, we’d have our operating costs covered and could focus on bringing you more original reporting from around Costa Rica. We work hard to keep our reporting independent and groundbreaking, but we can only do it with your help. Join The Tico Times 5% Club and help make stories like this one possible.Support the Tico Times Facebook Commentslast_img read more