Report Maersk Eyes LandBased Acquisitions

first_imgzoomImage Courtesy: Maersk World’s largest shipping company Maersk is reportedly targeting acquisitions on land to bolster its logistics operations as part of the group’s transformation from a conglomerate to an integrated global container logistics company.“The future will be very much about scaling the land side of the equation . . . We for sure have to do some acquisitions in the logistics space, primarily to gain capability and scale,” Søren Skou, Maersk’s Chief Executive Officer, is quoted by the Financial Times as saying.As reported, potential acquisition candidates are likely to include trucks, warehouses and other important segments of the supply chain management, but the company would refrain from making multi-billion deals and go after bolt-on acquisitions.The key reason behind taking a disciplined investment approach is in line with Maersk’s desire to reduce its debt at a time when operating costs, led by high bunker prices, exert high pressure on the company’s earnings.The remaking of Maersk Group is expected to last between three to five years. For the transformation to be completed, Maersk is yet to finalize the separation of its energy business, as structural solutions are still being sought for Maersk Supply Service.Namely, in November 2018, Vincent Clerc, Maersk’s Executive Vice President, said the group would not finalize the sale of its Maersk Supply Service business, which was expected to be completed by the end of the year.As part of its energy business separation drive, earlier this year Maersk announced its spin off of Maersk Drilling as a standalone company on Nasdaq Copenhagen in 2019.Furthermore, Maersk is in the middle of its integration process of the German liner company Hamburg Süd, which was acquired in November 2017.Danish shipping major said that since the integration is progressing faster than planned the company expects synergies from the merger to reach at least USD 500 million by 2019.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

WRITER DIRECTOR STAR – CATHERINE REITMAN IS A REAL LIFE WORKIN MOM

first_imgAdvertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Workin’ Moms sold to FX first, before they passed and the CBC snapped it up. How is producing TV in Canada different than in the States? Are there things you can do here that you can’t do there?Absolutely. Coming to Canada has been incredibly liberating, both creatively and production-wise for [my husband and co-producer/co-star] Philip and I. For one, we’re partners in the creation of our show, as opposed to the usual contact you’d get in the United States, where you’re an employee on a show of your own creation. So, being able to feel ownership not only is exhilarating because it’s yours, but also you feel so much more responsibility, you know? If the show fails or succeeds, it’s on you. Catherine Reitman is living that working mom life—hard. She is the showrunner on CBC’s comedy hit Workin’ Moms (which she produces with her husband Philip Sternberg); she also writes and directs for the show. Oh, and stars on it. In addition to her show baby, she has two little ones at home. (She also pops up on Black-ish from time to time.) Reitman has won fans among the mom brigade and beyond for her raw, honest portrayal of the trials and tribulations of motherhood, from postpartum depression to breastfeeding boobs. With season three premiering today, we spoke with Reitman about directing cranky old men, tackling #MeToo on-screen, and working with her hubs.What are some issues and experiences that you felt were missing from the modern TV landscape that you wanted to show on Workin’ Moms?I felt that there was a limited portrayal of how mothers appeared on television. When I first got pregnant, my husband and I were huge consumers of premium cable television, and we were watching all of these shows, and it would either be the B-storyline of a show like Homeland, where she’s a working mother, or you have even smaller C-storylines on a show like Mad Men. And when mother storylines were A-storylines, they felt either very broad or kind of melodramatic—I wanted to see the comedy that I was used to watching with my husband, but my story. And I couldn’t find that anywhere. Advertisement Twitter Facebook Advertisementlast_img read more