Rugby steps up transformation drive

first_imgThe Vodacom Cup has been contested on an annual basis since 1998 and is an inter-provincial competition for all 14 South African unions. Jurie Roux, the CEO of Saru, said that no sanctions had been specified, should a province fail to select the required numbers of black players. He said the question and other operational matters around the policy would be addressed by the Games and Policy committee. Hoskins said Saru had taken the initiative, rather than wait for other agencies to force action. “The Vodacom Cup is a critical step on the development pathway in professional rugby, but it had moved away from its primary purpose of presenting opportunities for young emerging players, particularly black players. “All the 14 provinces recognised that fact and that we needed to address it as a strategic objective at our Transformation Indaba last year. That and other decisions were shared with the Department of Sports and Recreation, as well as the Parliamentary Portfolio Committee. ‘We needed to intervene’“The mood of the organisation is that we needed to intervene – and this was coming from the provinces as well – to see the graph of black player representation begin to rise,” he said. SAinfo reporter and SA Rugby ‘Tangible step’“This is rugby’s tangible step on delivering on that pledge,” he said. “The intended outcome is an increased pool of black talent from which Absa Currie Cup and Vodacom Super Rugby coaches can select and, in due course, more options for the Springbok coach.”center_img 15 August 2013 The South African Rugby Union (Saru) has stepped up its transformation drive, announcing compulsory targets for next season’s Vodacom Cup competition that will require a minimum of seven black players in each of the country’s provincial teams. The directive, released on Wednesday, also says that at least of those players must be in the starting 15, and at least two of the players must be forwards. The initiative was taken by the executive council of Saru on Monday and discussed with provincial unions on Tuesday. The numbers were determined in line with Saru’s global transformation strategy and after a review of historical levels of black representation in the competition. The tournament runs from March to April and, since its introduction, has been the competition in which virtually the majority of Springboks have made their senior provincial debut. ‘Commitment to transformation’“This decision to introduce measurable targets underlines Saru’s commitment to transformation,” Saru president Oregan Hoskins said in a statement. last_img read more

Housing Trends and Housing Predictions

first_img Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details. This article is only available to GBA Prime Members Start Free Trial Already a member? Log incenter_img Predicting the future is cheap. Anyone can do it, and history shows that predictions made by experts are rarely any more accurate than predictions made by your average cranky uncle.Since any idiot can jump into this swimming pool, it’s clearly my turn to do so. With more chutzpah than data, I hereby present my own housing predictions.We’ll start by examining a few trends and predictions that never blossomed.The tiny house trend. Some tiny house enthusiasts have trumpeted tiny houses as the wave of the future. My prediction: they aren’t. In fact, in 2018 the average new single family home measured 2,600 square feet. That’s about the same size as it was in 2013 — so, while the trend for ever-bigger houses is starting to level off, there aren’t any signs of a rush toward tiny houses. Obviously, a 2,600 square foot home is still considerably bigger than 2,400 square feet, which was the size of the average new home in 2011.Almost everyone wants more space than a tiny house provides. The only reason that people in New York and San Francisco put up with their dinky apartments is that larger apartments are ridiculously expensive.The smart house trend. While it’s true that some Americans love web-enabled electrical appliances, and want to use a phone app to control every device in their home, there are even more Americans who are worried that smart appliances invite hackers (or ex-husbands, or rogue government agents) to invade their lives. Other Americans aren’t happy about the fact that smart appliances will provide new opportunities for marketing companies to monitor their daily routines and monetize the gathered data. I predict that the smart house trend will be a bust.Cohousing.  For some people, the idea is alluring: move to a small community… last_img read more

I made mistakes in World Cup: Shahid Afridi

first_imgThe semifinal loss to India in the World Cup continues to rankle Pakistan’s ODI captain Shahid Afridi who said it was a mistake to position himself in the lower-half of the batting order in the high-voltage game.”I am not a born captain and I also make mistakes. I made mistakes in the World Cup particularly in the semifinal at Mohali. I should have gone up the order like Mahendra Singh Dhoni did against Sri Lanka in the final at Mumbai,” Afridi said on a show on Geo News.The flamboyant all-rounder said with Abdul Razzaq also available down the order, he should have taken a chance and promoted himself in the semifinal against India.”The move by Dhoni in the final to come up himself worked and it could have also worked for us but we all make mistakes it was my mistake,” he said.He pointed out that India had one of the strongest and best batting line-ups in the world and when Pakistan bowled them out for 260, there was total silence at the innings break in the stadium.”Once we held them down to 260, I knew we had a strong chance of winning the match. Unfortunatly, we didn’t bat well and the moment Umar Akmal got out, I had a bad feeling it was not going our way,” he said.”I am learning every day as captain because it is a big learning process.”Afridi refused to to comment on Indo-Pak relations but reiterated that there were some elements in the Indian media who were negative about the ties.advertisement”About that I am convinced there are negative elements.And if both countries want to move forward this mindset has to change.”I am not against India or Indian people or Hindus. They are Hindus living in Pakistan just like Muslims in India and since this is a very sensitive issue I have decided that from now on I will not speak on it,” Afridi said.Afridi also said he never expected to end up as the joint highest wicket-taker in the World Cup.”I didn’t go into the tournament thinking I will take 21 wickets. It is a big honor for me and I am happy that I contributed to the team’s cause.”Afridi and Zaheer Khan finished with 21 wickets apiece in the World Cup.Afridi insisted he had no immediate plans to retire from international cricket.”While the 2015 World Cup is still a long way away I am presently looking at the Twenty20 World Cup that will be held next year. I will continue to play and captain the side as long as I am performing and as long as the board and people can tolerate and accept me,” he added.He said while he was in favour of rebuilding the team after the World Cup but, radicial changes should be avoided.”First of all this assumption that seniors have been dropped for the West Indies tour is not correct. They have been rested as the selectors and management want to try out some new players. I am for change but not in a haphazard manner and we can’t just dump our senior players who have given so much to Pakistan cricket.”The Pakistan captain also insisted that he was grateful to some former players and seniors such as Younus Khan, Kamran Akmal and Misbah-ul-Haq who had supported him.”The main target I and Vicky bhai (Waqar Younis) had was to ensure a clean and good dressing room atmosphere in the World Cup and to get the team to gel together and I think we succeeded in doing that,” he said.last_img read more