Rector provides details on Walsh Hall renovations

first_imgAs the fall semester drew to a close, the Walsh community girls gathered for a meeting with the Walsh Hall renovation team to discuss the changes to the building. According to Liz Detwiler, the Walsh Hall rector, the building will have a number of updated features including expanded rooms and new common areas.“For the new renovations, I know that all of the piping and plumbing in the building is going to be new,” Detwiler said. “Some of the rooms are going to be resized to be more appropriate to the amount of people in them. … We’re going to have lounges on every floor with full kitchens.”The dorm will have a new elevator and the private restrooms connected to individual dorms will be replaced with public restrooms. The renovated residence hall will also include new apartments.“We’ll be getting a new apartment space for in-residence priests, or faculty members and probably most importantly, it’s going to be accessible for people of all physical abilities now,” Detwiler added.Walsh Hall president Aly Sonnen said before the meeting, the Walsh community girls did not know much about the renovations.“We had a ton of questions,” Sonnen said. “Until the presentation, we really did not know much about what was going on. You can’t see that much from outside the building.“There were a lot of questions just about what it’s going to look like and what our lives next year are going to look like as a result of the renovation. They answered them all really well, though.”Freshman Sammie Escamilla said she thinks Pangborn Hall is a nice building, though she has not lived in Walsh Hall yet.“I was never in Walsh, so I know nothing different,” Escamilla said. “To me … [Pangborn is] nice. Other people say it’s not so nice. When you tell people you live in Pangborn, they kind of give you the ‘Oh, I’m sorry face’ but I mean, I think it’s a nice building. The rooms aren’t too small. We have no headroom but other than that, it’s not too bad.”In Walsh Hall, each floor consisted of one long hallway and there weren’t any sections. Junior Shea Kelly-Buckley said she first noticed Pangborn’s hallways when moving into the dorm, as they were very distinct from Walsh’s.“It was different,” Kelly-Buckley said. “It felt a little bit smaller. There were sections, which was new. Just having corners was something kind of different. But my room in Pangborn is actually bigger than the rooms in Walsh, so it’s been very comfortable.”Pangborn’s smaller hallways have been an adjustment for the community, according to Sonnen.“I think the biggest thing is that Walsh as a building made for community really easily,” Sonnen said. “Pangborn has a lot narrower hallways and a lot less common space that, when we’re throwing events or even just meeting new people, it’s harder to do that.”Sonnen said the “non-physical” aspects of Walsh have not changed.“We talk about ‘Walsh Love’ a lot and we have three main tenets of our being,” Sonnen said. “They’re safety, inclusion and community, so that’s really what we’re trying to cultivate in Walsh.”Kelly-Buckley said in some ways, moving to Pangborn has not changed the feeling of dorm life for the Walsh community.“Because they kept the whole Walsh community together, it feels the same to me inside the dorm,” Kelly-Buckley said. “Obviously the physical location is different, but you know, we’re still Walsh.”Tags: Construction, Pangborn Hall, Walsh community, Walsh Halllast_img read more

Student senate discusses academic honor code

first_imgIn this week’s session of the Notre Dame student senate, Hugh Page, dean of the First Year of Studies and vice president and associate provost for undergraduate affairs, took the floor with student members of the University Code of Honor Committee to discuss the ongoing review of the Academic Code of Honor.“One of our goals is to try and do a fairly thorough rewriting of the Honor Code but before we do that we figured that it was really important for us to solicit feedback from as wide a cross section of students as we can, and also to solicit feedback from faculty,” Page said.Page spoke of the student survey that was distributed this past fall as well as a faculty survey, the results of both indicating the need for further conversation among the entire academic community, which the committee plans to facilitate through a series of focus groups. The members of the senate broke into smaller committees to discuss what kinds of questions would be most relevant in the discussions of the upcoming focus groups.Committee member Nate McKeon, a senior, led discussion about the clarity of the Code of Honor.“How clear is [the Code] in defining actual academic dishonesty, like, you know, if you’re going into an assignment or an exam, do you have a good grasp on what academic dishonesty is?” McKeon asked.Students shared a common concern in deciphering the grey areas of academic dishonesty. All agreed that while copying the answers of another student on a final exam is an obvious violation of the Honor Code, there is more ethical ambiguity in collaborating on homework assignments, projects and small quizzes.Sophomore Dillon Hall senator Tim O’Connell said further obscurity arises when considering the distinct styles of learning and teaching in different fields of study and said a large part of the responsibility falls on the professors to clearly delineate their expectations.“We as a group thought it was more of the professor’s job to kind of outline,” O’Connell said. “[In engineering] we think there’s a lot of not so much of a grey area on the homework because professors are usually, ‘Hey, work on the homework together just turn in your own,’ and then for tests it’s pretty obvious, just do your own. … We had some kids in Arts and Letters and Mendoza who thought it was kind of more of a grey area ’cause they have a lot more, kind of multiple choice, Sakai quizzes.”In fact, whether the professors should claim responsibility in clarifying their interpretations of the Code or the students should be expected to apply the code in a “one size fits all” mentality was a popular point of discussion. McGlinn senator, sophomore Maria Palazzolo, said her group was surprised to learn the professors did not share their own opinions on the code. “We said we think it’s more of the professor’s job to say for the specific class, because it’s different for each class what they would want or how it works,” Palazzolo said. “ … But Natasha, who facilitated the discussion, said that the professors think it’s the student’s job. So it’s a miscommunication that needs to be fixed.”Additionally, the ease of obtaining increasingly common online resources further complicates the issue of cheating, as sophomore and Cavanaugh Hall senator Brittany Benninger said.“We talked about online resources, if you will, so like those sites where you can buy tests … how does that play into the new Honor Code?” Benninger said.Tags: academic honor code, academics, cheating, Senatelast_img read more

Dispute between the City of Dubrovnik and Excelsa nekretnina resolved: The Dubrovnik cable car starts operating

first_imgAlthough ATMs are located in private premises, the fact is that they disturb the views of the historic core and the UNESCO protected site, and thus disturb the view of the same. “These are significant funds for the City of Dubrovnik that we will spend on improving the infrastructure, starting from the sports one onwards”, Said the Mayor of the City of Dubrovnik, Mato Franković, adding that the City of Dubrovnik will earn around 10 million kuna annually from the concession fee. This decision was made due to pressure and protests from the citizens of Dubrovnik, who expressed their dissatisfaction due to “ATMophobia” in the old town. They placed flowers in front of ATMs in protest. At yesterday’s 23rd session of the City Council, an out-of-court settlement was reached between the City of Dubrovnik and Excelsa nekretnina doo as well as the Decision on granting a concession, thus creating all conditions for the continuation of the popular Dubrovnik cable car. the city of Dubrovnik was closed this year. Certainly, as the Dubrovnik cable car was one of the TOP attractions of all visitors to Dubrovnik, and as its closure caused the most damage to Dubrovnik as a destination. So resolving this dispute is certainly great news for Dubrovnik. ” The fine is 10 thousand kuna per legal entity and two thousand kuna for the responsible person. Penalties will be written every day because the law allows it, so we will see if it suits anyone to receive a 300 thousand kuna fine”Pointed out the Mayor of the City of Dubrovnik, Mato Franković, writes Dubrovnik Diary. ATMs are leaving the old town Certainly a move to praise and finally the introduction of order in Dubrovnik. When we talk about sustainable development, we are certainly talking about the space and identity that we must preserve, which is our most valuable resource. Unfortunately, we are a decade behind, if not more, behind such a mindset, but the example from Dubrovnik is proof that it is still not too late and that we can still save what can be saved. The decision made it forbidden to install ATMs as well as other devices and advertising cabinets, and that the existing ATMs must be removed within 30 days, unless the owner receives the approval of the Conservation Department of the Ministry of Culture. Dubrovnik councilors also adopted amendments to the Decision on Communal Order, which should ring ATMs in the historic center if the owners do not obtain the approval of the conservator. The dispute between the City of Dubrovnik and the company Excelsa nekretnina, which are the owners of the famous Dubrovnik cable car, has finally been resolved. Photo: Pexels.com Thus, the debt from the past will be settled, with which the City of Dubrovnik will be paid HRK 26 million, and from now on the variable part of the concession fee is determined in the amount of 15% of revenues from the sale of cable car tickets, while the concession is granted for 50 year. Cover photo: Dubrovnik Cable Carlast_img read more

NCAA members, Atlanta mayor announce start of Final Four

first_imgATLANTA — The press conference announcing the final stretch of an event called March Madness was much more low key than its name would suggest.High-ranking members of the NCAA, Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed, U.S. Ambassador for the United Nations Andrew Young and others who helped bring the Final Four to Atlanta spoke to a crowd of about 50 people, most of who were with the media, at 3 p.m. Thursday in the Georgia World Congress Center. Syracuse plays Michigan on Saturday at 8:49 p.m. in the Georgia Dome for a chance to advance to the national championship.“We’re going to have some of the best college basketball in the United States of America over the next few days,” Reed said. “I couldn’t be more excited.”People who spoke at the press conference discussed what the event means to the city in the short and long term, as well as charitable efforts related to the Final Four.After thanking the NCAA and partners such as the Georgia Institute of Technology and Coca-Cola Co., Reed talked about the economic effects of the Final Four for the city. Georgia Tech President Bud Peterson and John Rutledge, vice president of market unit sales operations for Coca-Cola, addressed the crowd before Reed.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textReed said more than 100,000 people are expected to travel to Atlanta for the Final Four games, which is expected to generate $70 million in economic activity for places such as hotels and restaurants.“This tournament brings energy and excitement,” he said. “And you can feel it when you go outside.”Earlier in the press conference, Dan Gavitt, vice president of men’s basketball championships for the NCAA, talked about the significance of holding the 75th NCAA Tournament in Atlanta. This year also marks the first time the Division-II and Division-III championship games are being played in the same city.Gavitt said 7,500 pairs of shoes and 2,500 food boxes will be distributed to people in need throughout Atlanta with the help of local groups. The NCAA will work with another group to refurbish a local community center, he said.“We, along with the local organizing committee at the NCAA, are excited to leave a lasting legacy here in Atlanta through a number of initiatives,” he said.Young, the U.S. ambassador for the U.N. and a civil rights activist, was the last person to speak at the conference. He spoke freely, not reading from a prepared speech.Young spoke about the role of sports in society, which he said extends “far beyond that which anything anybody could imagine.” He cited the ability for a table tennis match to change foreign policy, and then joked that if the North Koreans played basketball, problems could be solved very quickly.Another example of the effect of sports in society he provided was with the civil rights movement, saying Martin Luther King Jr. “grew up” in the Butler Street YMCA.“Even in our movement, and particularly as we went around the country trying to organize young people for nonviolent activities, we found that the only way you could catch up with them was quite often on a basketball court,” Young said. “And they wouldn’t listen to you until you got in the game with them.”He ended the conference by going back to the positive effects the tournament will have on the city.Said Young: “Here for the next few days, the world will be focused on Atlanta, as much as it has, I think, since the Olympics in 1996.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on April 5, 2013 at 1:46 am Contact Dylan: dmsegelb@syr.edu | @dylan_segelbaumlast_img read more