Rector provides details on Walsh Hall renovations

first_imgAs the fall semester drew to a close, the Walsh community girls gathered for a meeting with the Walsh Hall renovation team to discuss the changes to the building. According to Liz Detwiler, the Walsh Hall rector, the building will have a number of updated features including expanded rooms and new common areas.“For the new renovations, I know that all of the piping and plumbing in the building is going to be new,” Detwiler said. “Some of the rooms are going to be resized to be more appropriate to the amount of people in them. … We’re going to have lounges on every floor with full kitchens.”The dorm will have a new elevator and the private restrooms connected to individual dorms will be replaced with public restrooms. The renovated residence hall will also include new apartments.“We’ll be getting a new apartment space for in-residence priests, or faculty members and probably most importantly, it’s going to be accessible for people of all physical abilities now,” Detwiler added.Walsh Hall president Aly Sonnen said before the meeting, the Walsh community girls did not know much about the renovations.“We had a ton of questions,” Sonnen said. “Until the presentation, we really did not know much about what was going on. You can’t see that much from outside the building.“There were a lot of questions just about what it’s going to look like and what our lives next year are going to look like as a result of the renovation. They answered them all really well, though.”Freshman Sammie Escamilla said she thinks Pangborn Hall is a nice building, though she has not lived in Walsh Hall yet.“I was never in Walsh, so I know nothing different,” Escamilla said. “To me … [Pangborn is] nice. Other people say it’s not so nice. When you tell people you live in Pangborn, they kind of give you the ‘Oh, I’m sorry face’ but I mean, I think it’s a nice building. The rooms aren’t too small. We have no headroom but other than that, it’s not too bad.”In Walsh Hall, each floor consisted of one long hallway and there weren’t any sections. Junior Shea Kelly-Buckley said she first noticed Pangborn’s hallways when moving into the dorm, as they were very distinct from Walsh’s.“It was different,” Kelly-Buckley said. “It felt a little bit smaller. There were sections, which was new. Just having corners was something kind of different. But my room in Pangborn is actually bigger than the rooms in Walsh, so it’s been very comfortable.”Pangborn’s smaller hallways have been an adjustment for the community, according to Sonnen.“I think the biggest thing is that Walsh as a building made for community really easily,” Sonnen said. “Pangborn has a lot narrower hallways and a lot less common space that, when we’re throwing events or even just meeting new people, it’s harder to do that.”Sonnen said the “non-physical” aspects of Walsh have not changed.“We talk about ‘Walsh Love’ a lot and we have three main tenets of our being,” Sonnen said. “They’re safety, inclusion and community, so that’s really what we’re trying to cultivate in Walsh.”Kelly-Buckley said in some ways, moving to Pangborn has not changed the feeling of dorm life for the Walsh community.“Because they kept the whole Walsh community together, it feels the same to me inside the dorm,” Kelly-Buckley said. “Obviously the physical location is different, but you know, we’re still Walsh.”Tags: Construction, Pangborn Hall, Walsh community, Walsh Halllast_img read more

3 ways to shore up your finances in 2020

first_img 39SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Details I don’t think anyone saw 2020 going the way it has. With job security at an all-time confusing level and viruses popping up out of nowhere, it’s a great time to make sure your accounts are ready for whatever comes next. Here are three ways you can make sure your money is in good shape going into 2021…Stop acting on impulses: If money isn’t really a problem for you, that’s great, but bad habits can come back to haunt you. Think about your spending habits. Do you make impulse buys any time you want? No matter how big or small, impulse purchases can lead to trouble if things are suddenly not going so well. If you have a pile of entertainment subscriptions, do you know which ones you’d cut loose if your budget suddenly tightened? Hopefully, when COVID leaves us, it’ll be saying “peace out” and never coming back, but if 2020 has taught us anything, it’s to expect the unexpected.Know how to use a credit card: Enjoying the use of a credit card can be dangerous, especially in the crazy times we’re currently in. Even if you find it pretty easy to pay off your purchases each month and you love earning cash rewards, what are you going to do if you drive to work one morning and find your office swallowed up by a giant sinkhole? Yeah that seems unlikely but like I said earlier, it’s 20 freakin’ 20. Look to the future: Have you saved enough to enjoy retirement one day? Are you going to be able to leave anything to your kids? There are a lot of questions and uncertainties when it comes to your financial future. Even if you don’t have heirs, humans are living longer than ever these days and you want to make sure you don’t outlive your savings. If you haven’t checked in with your financial advisor lately, use the unpredictability of 2020 as an excuse to at least have a quick conversation with them before the end of the year.last_img read more

Assisted dying conscientious objection questions too early – court

first_imgStuff co.nz 17 June 2020Family First Comment: Significant concern for groups like Hospice NZ…“The judge said hospices and other organisations could refuse to provide assisted dying services. But there also had to be a way for health practitioners to meet their obligations if asked by someone in the care of the hospice or organisation. It was not for the court to suggest ways those two positions could work together, the judge said. One of the questions was whether Crown funding for hospices could be declined if they were not offering assisted dying because of conscientious objection. The judge said questions about funding would have to await a case where the funding process was in issue.” And Hospice will pay the cost! Lose lose.A judge says it’s too early to clarify how conscientious objection rights for assisted dying might work in hospices.Hospice New Zealand, an umbrella organisation for all hospice services, wanted answers about how conscientious objection would operate if the End of Life Choice Act was accepted in the referendum in September.It hoped the answers would help inform debate on the referendum, and it wanted voters to be clear what they were being asked to decide.Hospice NZ was opposed to euthanasia or assisted suicide and a cornerstone of its care was to neither hasten nor postpone death.It took a case to the High Court in Wellington asking for declarations on the legal position but Justice Jill Mallon said in general the questions could not be decided until the issues arose against particular facts.A referendum on whether to put into force the End of Life Choice Act is to be run alongside the general election, and if the vote was “yes” the act would take effect a year after the result was declared.READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/121860950/assisted-dying-conscientious-objection-questions-too-early–courtKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more