The Mayday Foundation Announces Partnership with Parenting Coach, Emily McMason

first_imgFacebook96Tweet0Pin0Submitted by The Mayday FoundationWhen a family’s life is turned upside down by a cancer diagnosis, there are many pieces to pick up. In Thurston and Grays Harbor Counties, families are able to turn to The Mayday Foundation for immediate, practical financial support.  Now, this assistance extends beyond getting help with paying household expenses and into the emotional side of being a parent while coping with cancer.“My time with The Mayday Foundation families is an important way to be a part of our community response to caring for those affected by cancer,” said Emily McMason. Photo courtesy: The Mayday Foundation“Along with financial assistance, The Mayday Foundation now includes a complimentary session with parenting coach, Emily McMason,” explained founder and executive director, Amy Rowley.  “We are able to expand our support of the family past paying rent and mortgages and delivering gas and grocery cards and allow each family to access Emily’s vast knowledge of parenting techniques. Parenting advice and coaching is critical since most families have not coped with a health care crisis of this magnitude.”Emily McMason, who holds a masters degree in education from Harvard University, is also a mother of two children being raised in Olympia. “A healthy community is one in which we reach out and care for one another. It matters to me to give back to the community in which I live, work and raise my children. My time with The Mayday Foundation families is an important way to be a part of our community response to caring for those affected by cancer,” said McMason. “My passion for parents and children makes working with The Mayday Foundation a natural connection.”“Emily’s generous donation of time means local families can gain the emotional support they need to cope with cancer and still be the parent they want to be to their children,” added Rowley.  “The first concern, when a parent is diagnosed with cancer, is ‘will my kids be ok, will they be able to recover from this upheaval?’ Providing access to a trained, professional parenting coach rounds out The Mayday Foundation’s support.”For example, parents may choose to talk with Emily about processing the news, adjusting to new normals, redefining family balance and boundaries, help with understanding the reactions of those you love or imagining the family with a post-cancer perspective.“A cancer diagnosis isn’t simply about our health—it is about our whole life,” added McMason in summary. “Our parenting role doesn’t stop when cancer becomes a part of a family’s life—instead it gets more complex. Spending time with families as they navigate these new spaces is an incredibly meaningful way for me to give back to my community. It’s an honor to work with The Mayday Foundation families and provide emotional support as well as practical tools for parenting as they cope with cancer.”To connect with Emily McMason, visit the Evolving Parents website or call 360-951-0563. Coaching is available to individuals, couples or whole families.To keep up with how The Mayday Foundation is making an impact in Thurston and Grays Harbor counties, visit www.maydayfoundation.org or follow the non-profit organization on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter.last_img read more

NCAA allows Division I coaches to spend more virtual time with athletes

first_imgCoaches can only spend eight virtual hours a week with student-athletes, according to a press release from the NCAA. They must only participate in “nonphysical countable activities” which can include film review, chalk talks and team meetings, according to the same press release.  “This change not only allows coaches to continue to educate their student-athletes but also fosters the connectivity that comes with team-based activities,” said M. Grace Calhoun, the Council chair and athletic director at Penn.  On Thursday, the NCAA announced its Council Coordination Committee voted to allow Division I coaches in all sports to have more virtual connection with their teams. This policy will take effect starting on Monday, April 20 and last until May 31. center_img The NCAA is also requiring student-athletes to be given at least one day a week off without any nonphysical countable activities.last_img read more

Sheep industry scholarship opportunities

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Dr. Jack Judy Memorial Scholarship FundOhio Sheep Improvement Association (OSIA) and the Ohio Farm Bureau Foundation in coordination with the Dr. Jack Judy Family has created the Dr. Jack Judy Memorial Scholarship Fund to support future sheep farmers through a memorial scholarship program. The Dr. Jack Judy Memorial Scholarship Fund is offering a minimum of one $1,500 scholarship to a deserving young person who is at least a second year undergraduate student pursuing an agricultural degree.“We want to thank Dr. Jack Judy’s family for making a major contribution to this scholarship fund, it is a tremendous tribute to the family’s interest in the sheep industry and the family is very hopeful that this scholarship program will make a contribution to the sheep industry in Ohio” said Roger A. High, OSIA Executive Director.To assist the Ohio Sheep Improvement Association in “growing” this Dr. Jack Judy Memorial Scholarship program, please send memorial contributions in the name of Dr. Jack Judy to Ohio Farm Bureau Foundation, 280 N. High St., P.O. Box 182383, Columbus, OH 43218. The family of Dr. Judy, who passed away in April 2015, has established a memorial scholarship in his name to be administered through The Ohio Farm Bureau Foundation.According to his niece Jennifer Walker, the family has agreed to award the annual scholarship to a second-year college student who is either a member, or have parents who are members, of the Ohio Sheep Improvement Association.“The student doesn’t have to attend an Ohio school,” Walker said. “But he or she must be a resident of Ohio and be a member, or have parents who are members, of the association.”Interested and qualified students can apply online at ofbf.org/foundation through June 30. Walker said finalists will be interviewed by a selection committee comprised of Walker and members of the Ohio Sheep Improvement Association during the Ohio State Fair. This year interviews will take place July 30 and the winner will be announced July 31.“Preference is given to (agriculture) majors but it is not a necessity,” Walker said.Judy was a member of the Ohio State University Department of Animal Science until his retirement in 1984. For 33 years he specialized in the study and teaching of sheep production and management. He had the title of Professor Emeritus when he left OSU. He was inducted into the Ohio State Fair Hall of Fame in 1985.Always passionate about his students and their course of study, Judy was a faithful supporter of the Ralph Grimshaw scholarship, awarded through the Ohio Sheep Improvement Association. Grimshaw, who was chairman of the sheep department at the State Fair, and Judy were close friends, according to Mark Judy, Jack’s brother. Ralph H. Grimshaw Memorial Scholarship ProgramOSIA is again sponsoring the Ralph H. Grimshaw Memorial Scholarship to support future sheep farmers through its scholarship program. OSIA is offering a minimum of one $1,000 scholarship to deserving students that have graduated from high school and college students pursuing college degrees. Preference will be given to students pursuing a degree in agriculture.“The Ohio sheep industry depends on young people who are considering and pursuing a career that will be beneficial to the Ohio and United States sheep industry,” said Roger A. High, OSIA Executive Director.Applicants or their parents must be members of the Ohio Sheep Improvement Association and a 2016 graduating high school senior enrolled in, or a student currently attending a college or technical school. Completed applications and essays must be postmarked by June 30, 2016.Visit www.ohiosheep.org after May 15, 2016 for more information and to download an application.last_img read more

ODA announces expanded Asian Longhorned Beetle quarantine

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA), Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) and the United States Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA APHIS) today announced the addition of 576 acres of the East Fork Wildlife Area to the Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) quarantine zone in Clermont County. The addition increases the total square miles regulated for the beetle to 62 square miles, up from 61 square miles. The movement of hardwood logs, firewood, stumps, roots and branches within these regulated areas is prohibited.The quarantine expansion is the result of newly discovered infested trees found in late 2016 within the Williamsburg Township portion of the East Fork Wildlife Area, south of Clover Road. ODA and USDA APHIS tree inspection crews surveyed trees in the area, and infested and high-risk tree removals are occurring as part of the ALB eradication effort. A map of the regulated area can be found here.East Fork Wildlife Area consists of 2,705 acres that are managed by the ODNR Division of Wildlife for public hunting and fishing in southwestern Ohio. It is unlawful for any person to remove wood from a wildlife area without first obtaining approval.Adult ALBs are large, shiny black insects measuring 1 to 1 ½ inches long, not including antennae, with random white spots. Their white-banded antennae can be as long as the body itself on females and almost twice the body length on males.Signs of infestation include perfectly round exit holes (about 3/8 to 1/2 inch in diameter) made by adult beetles when they emerge from trees; pockmarks on tree trunks and branches where female beetles deposit eggs; frass (wood shavings and saw dust) produced by larvae feeding and tunneling; early fall coloration of leaves or dead branches; and running sap produced by the tree at the egg laying sites or in response to larval tunneling. The beetle will infest various common trees in Ohio, including all species of maple, buckeye, willow and elm.To report signs or symptoms of ALB, call the Ohio ALB Eradication Program Office at 513-381-7180 or report online at asianlonghornedbeetle.com.last_img read more

San Diego County confirms fourth E Coli case among child fairgoers

first_img July 2, 2019 Posted: July 2, 2019 Updated: 5:35 PM San Diego County confirms fourth E. Coli case among child fairgoers KUSI Newsroom, center_img KUSI Newsroom 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – County health officials Tuesday confirmed a new case of E. coli in a 6-year-old boy who recently visited the San Diego County Fair and whose contraction of the bacteria is believed related to visiting the animal exhibits and not washing his hands afterward.The San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency reported that the boy attended the fair and visited its animal exhibits on June 22. He started showing symptoms of an E. coli infection four days later, but did not require hospitalization and is currently recovering.Last week, 2-year-old Jedidiah Cabezuela died after visiting the fair and contracting E. coli, at which point the fair indefinitely closed its animal exhibits.Health officials also confirmed E.coli in two other children who attended the fair — a 9-year-old boy and a 13-year-old girl.The county also received reports last week of a fifth unconfirmed but probable case of the bacteria in an 11-year-old girl.People can avoid contracting the bacteria by thoroughly washing their hands after making contact with animals at places like farms, petting zoos and fair exhibits. Young children, older adults and people with weak immune systems are at particular risk, according to health officials.The HHSA and the California Department of Food and Agriculture have collected environmental samples at the fair in recent days to confirm the bacteria’s origin. However, results of the collected samples are not expected until after the fair closes July 4.“As we continue our investigation, more cases are likely to be reported,” said Dr. Wilma Wooten, the county’s public health officer. “This is typical of any public health investigation. Since we asked doctors to be on the lookout for (E. coli), they are more likely to test patients exhibiting symptoms.”While most people who contract E. coli do not develop severe complications, roughly 5 to 10% of those who contract the bacteria can develop a potentially life-threatening kidney infection. Symptoms do not appear for three to four days after contraction and can include severe abdominal cramps, watery or bloody diarrhea and vomiting.Residents should promptly call their doctor if they believe they have contracted E. coli, Wooten said, “especially if you have diarrhea that lasts for more than three days or diarrhea that is accompanied by a fever higher than 102 F, or blood in the stool, or so much vomiting that you cannot keep liquids down and you pass very little urine.” Categories: Health, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

President PM pay tribute to liberation war martyrs

first_imgPresident Abdul Hamid and prime minister Sheikh Hasina pay tributes to the martyrs of the liberation war at the National Memorial on Tuesday, 26 March 2019. Photo: PIDPresident Abdul Hamid and prime minister Sheikh Hasina paid rich tributes to the martyrs of the War of Liberation by placing wreaths at the National Memorial in Savar, Dhaka on Tuesday morning, marking the 49th Independence and National Day, reports UNB.President Hamid first placed a wreath at the altar of the memorial followed by the prime minister.After placing the wreaths, the president and the prime minister stood in solemn silence for some time as a mark of profound respect to the memories of the martyrs of the Great War of Liberation in 1971.A smartly turned-out contingent drawn from Bangladesh Army, Navy and Air Force presented a state salute on the occasion, while the bugles played the last post.Ministers, advisers, parliament members, the chiefs of the three services, freedom fighters, foreign diplomats and high civil and military officials were present on the occasion.Later, flanked by senior leaders of the party, Sheikh Hasina, also the president of Bangladesh Awami League, laid another wreath at the National Memorial on behalf of her party.last_img read more

Researchers suggest rate of evolution change can explain discrepancy between molecular clocks

first_img(Phys.org) —A pair of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Australia, believe they may have found a way to solve the discrepancy problem that exists between molecular biologists and paleontologists who disagree on the likely first appearance of placental mammals. They describe their new dating approach, which they call a “morphological clock” in their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B Citation: Researchers suggest rate of evolution change can explain discrepancy between molecular clocks and fossil evidence (2014, August 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-08-evolution-discrepancy-molecular-clocks-fossil.html More information: Ancient dates or accelerated rates? Morphological clocks and the antiquity of placental mammals, Proc. R. Soc. B 22 October 2014 vol. 281 no. 1793 20141278. rspb.royalsocietypublishing.or … nt/281/1793/20141278AbstractAnalyses of a comprehensive morphological character matrix of mammals using ‘relaxed’ clock models (which simultaneously estimate topology, divergence dates and evolutionary rates), either alone or in combination with an 8.5 kb nuclear sequence dataset, retrieve implausibly ancient, Late Jurassic–Early Cretaceous estimates for the initial diversification of Placentalia (crown-group Eutheria). These dates are much older than all recent molecular and palaeontological estimates. They are recovered using two very different clock models, and regardless of whether the tree topology is freely estimated or constrained using scaffolds to match the current consensus placental phylogeny. This raises the possibility that divergence dates have been overestimated in previous analyses that have applied such clock models to morphological and total evidence datasets. Enforcing additional age constraints on selected internal divergences results in only a slight reduction of the age of Placentalia. Constraining Placentalia to less than 93.8 Ma, congruent with recent molecular estimates, does not require major changes in morphological or molecular evolutionary rates. Even constraining Placentalia to less than 66 Ma to match the ‘explosive’ palaeontological model results in only a 10- to 20-fold increase in maximum evolutionary rate for morphology, and fivefold for molecules. The large discrepancies between clock- and fossil-based estimates for divergence dates might therefore be attributable to relatively small changes in evolutionary rates through time, although other explanations (such as overly simplistic models of morphological evolution) need to be investigated. Conversely, dates inferred using relaxed clock models (especially with discrete morphological data and MRBAYES) should be treated cautiously, as relatively minor deviations in rate patterns can generate large effects on estimated divergence dates. Explore further Research team claims fossil-only study of placental mammalian evolution time frame is wrongcenter_img To date the first appearance of a something in the biological record, modern scientists have two main tools—dating fossils and using what’s known as a molecular clock, where DNA techniques are used to follow the evolution of species divergence. Problems come in when the two methods offer different results. That’s been the case with researchers attempting to date the first arrival of placental mammals. The earliest fossils suggest they showed up on the scene approximately 66 million years ago. The molecular clock approach, however, suggests it happened long before that, approximately 90 to 100 million years ago. In this new effort, the research pair suggest a way to resolve the difference (without claiming that the difference is because older fossils have just not been found.) They call their approach a morphological clock, which is based on the progression of anatomical differences that arise in a species, rather than DNA tracing. Using it, they suggest it’s possible that placental mammals first arrived as early as 160 million years ago. But they have a caveat, they suggest, that the speed at which evolutionary changes took place could have changed, which if taken into account, would bring the time frame closer to 66 million years ago. As for why a change in speed of evolution might have taken place, the team notes that it might have occurred soon after the dinosaurs went extinct—which would have opened up a whole new niche that could have been filled very quickly by the advent of placental mammals.If this new approach is to be taken seriously, it would cast doubts on the accuracy of molecular clocks in general—they’re based on the assumption that evolution occurs at a fixed rate. It could also help explain the “sudden” appearance of a wide variety of species 540 million years ago—the Cambrian explosion—which many believe led to the appearance of all modern animal groups. © 2014 Phys.org A four-day-old mouse. Credit: Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more