Badgers’ weekend series ends in familiar fashion

first_imgAs Sunday’s match concluded, the season also on the brink of conclusion, it was the same old story for the Wisconsin volleyball team in its final weekend series at the Field House.The Badgers looked as good as anyone in the Big Ten as they easily defeated the overmatched Iowa Hawkeyes by a score of 3-0 Friday night. But Sunday, Wisconsin struggled with consistency as it looked overmatched by ninth-ranked Nebraska 3-0. The matches could not have been any greater polar opposites, just like the season for Wisconsin. Consistency -or lack thereof – has been the key for the Badgers all season long.All season long, Wisconsin has shown it can play with anyone, as they battled top-ranked Penn State in each set on national television before losing in straight sets. Then the Badgers played an Indiana team that had won just one Big Ten match all season, but managed to come into Madison and beat Wisconsin 3-1. That inconsistency continued Friday night.In the opening match of the weekend, the Badgers displayed some of their best volleyball of the season, beating the Hawkeyes 3-0. They hit an impressive .384 for the match, including a .552 percentage in the second set, which they won easily 25-16.UW head coach Pete Waite talked about the stellar play of the team on Senior Day.“I thought we really played a good match,” Waite said Friday. “I thought the seniors played well and everyone played hard for them. We had a nice balanced attack and really played a solid match.”Despite the dominating win, the Badgers still had their struggles as they committed nine service errors. Against one of the top teams in the conference, those errors would have proved to be devastating. But against a last place Big Ten team, the Badgers were able to get away with it.Sunday was much uglier. Wisconsin was not able to sneak by with errors Sunday against the ninth-ranked Cornhuskers. The match was the entire season in a nutshell: flashes of brilliance and the same errors that would prove to be crushing in defeats.Once again, the Badgers were able to play with another top-tier opponent point-for-point, but they were not able to seal the deal.The Badgers struggled with everything from hitting to even communicating. There were multiple instances Sunday when a ball would fall in between multiple Wisconsin defenders who looked at each other with apparent confusion.Junior right setter Julie Mikaelsen talked about the lack of communication.“It’s just about being aggressive,” Mikaelsen said. “We just need to call the ball and take the ball. That’s just what we got to do.”There were instances against the Cornhuskers when it looked like the Badgers would get over the hump and finally win a decisive set. Wisconsin got out to a very hot start in the second set, leading by a score of 13-6.Then a 10-1 run found UW down by two just as quickly as it had built its lead. The Badgers were never able to recover from their run and lost the set 25-20.Wisconsin continuously hurt itself Sunday as well, committing 19 attack errors in the match, including seven in the first two sets. Wisconsin hit just .171 in those two sets and hit just .100 in the third set as only one player on the team hit over .250 for the Badgers.“I couldn’t tell you,” Waite said of the reason for the errors. “That’s something we talked about in the locker room; we knew we had high errors even to start the match. That just shouldn’t happen. It doesn’t matter who’s on the other side of the net.”Wisconsin concludes the regular season this week with its final home match coming Wednesday against No. 10 Minnesota and then their final match Friday at Purdue. With their tournament hopes dwindling, senior outside hitter Bailey Reshel told an all too familiar tale for the team: the need to bounce back.“We just need to go after it,” Reshel said of the final week of the season. “It sucks to lose, but we still have a chance at the tournament and the biggest thing is to move forward.”last_img read more

Fair Play… GVC Holdings outlines year of wholesale CSR change

first_img StumbleUpon Submit Share Share Related Articles GVC – YGAM’s Parent Hub is a vital tool for honest and open conversations August 4, 2020 GVC hails SportsAid programme developing next generation of British athletes August 7, 2020 EPIC and Whysup ‘continue to make real change’ with partnership renewal August 19, 2020 Virginia McDowell – GVC HoldingsFTSE100 gambling group GVC Holdings has this morning published its 2019 ‘Fair Play – Corporate Social Responsibility Report’ outlining the multiple changes governing the company’s long-term corporate sustainability objectives.In the report’s forward statement, GVC Independent Non-Executive Director Virginia McDowell acknowledges the new responsibilities demands placed on the company which now operates global gaming’s largest online gambling portfolio, employing 25,000 staff worldwide.“GVC’s growth has brought with it a commensurate expansion in the expectations around how we manage our responsibilities towards society, particularly as they relate to safer gambling,” said McDowell.“And let me be clear from the outset: Our ambition is to be the safest and most trusted operator in the world.”As a corporate advisor, McDowell has been charged with leading GVC’s ‘dedicated CSR Committee’ – a governance-level unit which has reviewed all corporate policies ‘covering regulatory compliance, AML, responsible gaming, health and safety, environmental impact, data protection and diversity in the workplace’.Furthermore, as a governance function, the CSR Committee will offer guidance to GVC leaders and stakeholders on social responsibility strategies, oversight, planning and coordination.“Sitting below the Board CSR Committee, the CSR Steering Group consists of functional leaders from across the business, including Investor Relations, HR, Legal, Health, Safety and Security, Operations and Communications,” explained the GVC report.“Convened by our Head of CSR, the Group oversees implementation of the CSR strategy, coordinating delivery across all operating units and central function.”Moving forward, an enlarged GVC Holdings will operate under the mandate of its ‘Fair Play – CSR strategy’ which sets out ‘priorities and activities across the areas where GVC has an impact on society’.GVC states that its new CSR strategy has been developed with ‘a deep understanding of where the industry is heading’, which will see GVC operate an ‘emerging framework’, promoting social responsibility practices across GVC’s current operational and stakeholder value chains.Treating CSR as a corporate discipline, GVC has appointed Grainne Hurst as the FTSE firm’s first Director of Responsible Gambling, supported by former group communications lead Jay Dossetter as Head of CSR.2018 saw GVC launch its ‘Changing for the Bettor’ campaign, setting out the FTSE firm’s ‘seven pillars’ for promoting safe play, fair gambling and better standards.Grainne Hurst – GVC HoldingsThe ‘Changing for the Bettor’ campaign has further seen GVC form strategic collaborations with gambling harm minimisation consultancy EPIC Risk Management (EPIC), in addition to supporting the Harvard Medical School’s ‘Division on Addiction‘ with a $5 million research funding on addiction behaviours, triggers and analyses.“We were very clear when we launched our strategy that it should not remain a static document, but instead would be constantly evolving and adapting as new opportunities and challenges occur,” said Grainne Hurst, Director of Responsible Gambling at GVC Holdings.“We are currently working on a number of projects, including additional treatment provision for gambling-related harm, digital app therapy provisions, the use of AI to help minimise harm and our research partnership with Harvard.“We are determined that responsible gambling is a non-negotiable part of the way we do business, and ‘Changing for the Bettor’ is our considered attempt to lead the way in minimising the risk from gambling-related harm.”A year since the launch of ‘Changing for the Bettor’, GVC governance states that the company is ready to pursue a series of ‘Quantitative commitments’ for future yearsGVC’s ‘Quantitative commitments’ related to safer gambling include:Doubling the amount GVC donates to problem gambling research, education and treatment bodies to 0.2% of UK gross gaming revenue, rising gradually to 1% by 2022 (the equivalent of £20 million).Starting a safer gambling awareness and education programmes for school children through GVC’s partnership with EPIC Risk Management.Developing the firm’s partnership with Harvard Medical School to better understand and reduce the potential for problem gambling behaviour through rigorous research.last_img read more