Jonah Capital Donates 2 Vehicles to Nimba Ebola Task Force

first_imgThe Britain-owned mining company, Jonah Capital, on 7th October 2014 donated two brand new vehicles to the Nimba Ebola Task Force in the ongoing fight against the deadly Ebola virus. Making the presentation to President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf during her tour of Nimba on 7th October 2014 in Sanniquellie, the Geologist consultant to the company, Mr. Emmanuel O. Sherman, said the donation was the company’s own way of contributing to the fight against Ebola in Nimba.He said Jonah Capital remains committed to the people of Nimba as they go through this time of the Ebola crisis.Along with the vehicles, they also gave 100 buckets, chloride, powder soap and among others.In response, President Sirleaf thanked the company for standing by the country during this tough period.“You are a good and honest partner in this time of needs,” she said.Jonah Capital is one of those mining companies that are on several mountain ranges across Nimba.Early this year, the mining company began the rehabilitation of feeder roads around the Twah River and Buu-Yao administrative districts where their exploration had been concentrated.The donation of these vehicles will surely enhance  the fast movement of health personals across the county.The two vehicles are all Toyota Land Cruiser Jeeps, one is a pickup type that might likely be used to transport medical supplies while the other can be used to transport personnel or carryout needed support.The need for vehicles for the County Health Team in combating the spread of the Ebola virus were among the challenges the Nimba Health Officer, Dr. Collins Bowah, outlined to the President when toured the county recently. Dr. Bowah said, Nimba with 17 administrative districts has one ambulance and the task force was finding it very difficult to effectively cover all of the districts.   Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

After Effects Fundamentals Lesson 4: Editing & Animating Text

first_imgLearn how to animate text in lesson 4 of our After Effects Fundamentals course.We’ve arrived at lesson 4 of our 10 part Fundamentals of After Effects series. Up to this point we’ve learned about the After Effects interface, basic expressions, and keying. In this lesson we share some tricks for working with text in Adobe After Effects.Learning how to animate and work with text is an essential skill for every motion graphic designer to know. Unlike still designs made in Illustrator or Photoshop, text in After Effects requires a designer to take into consideration the length at which the viewer will be reading the text. This makes it more complicated but also more dynamic . This After Effects video tutorial covers:Text layersThe character windowStylizing textKey-framing source textWorking with path optionsAnimating textIf you are still feeling inspired after watching this tutorial check out some of the other awesome text based tutorials on the PremiumBeat blog like 3D corner text and how to create animated hipster logos.Best viewed full screen:We will post new lessons every Monday for the next 6 weeks. Check the Premiumbeat blog for future lessons. And while you’re there you can watch more After Effects tutorials, read the latest filmmaking news and pick up some post-production tricks!What did you think of this lesson? Have any questions? Let us know in the comments below.last_img read more

The Best Video Professionals to Learn From

first_imgVideo production professionals are constantly learning from fellow filmmakers. Here are some video professionals who have given so much to help and educate others.Whenever a video editor needs to learn a technique, they can easily search online. When a cinematographer is looking for their next camera, they search for camera reviews. When a motion graphic designer is looking for elements, they can easily find material and tutorials.The internet has become a great source for finding out exactly what you want to know. However, we often forget that it takes a dedicated individual to put up free material for others.These video production professionals have absolutely no reason to help others, yet they do it anyway, making the industry a better place. Here are some of the best video professionals (and best people) to learn from.Philip BloomImage via Philip BloomYou can’t talk about video professionals who have cultivated an educational environment without talking about Philip Bloom. Bloom has amassed a large following on social media, and deservedly so. He is constantly interacting with filmmakers, often talking about camera gear, techniques, and more.His website is full of incredibly detailed camera and gear reviews, an array of video production tutorials, and fantastic resources that grew the DSLR filmmaking community.Despite the negative comments he seems to receive on occasion, he has continually interacted with the filmmaking community for better or worse. He also heads one of the largest fundraising teams in the UK (and world) each November during his Movember campaign.Bloom started his career as a cameraman for Sky News. He has shot several short films, documentaries, and even worked on the feature film Red Tails. He is currently shooting the second season of the CNN series The Wonder List.You can follow and learn from Philip Bloom on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Vimeo, and philipbloom.net.Andrew KramerImage via Video CopilotAndrew Kramer is the founder of Video Copilot, an online resource for motion design and visual effects. In 2005, Kramer started making After Effects tutorials that were featured on Creative COW.By teaching others After Effects, Andrew Kramer became an expert — eventually leading him to design his own software and plugins. Video Copilot plugins like Element 3D and Optical Flares have become standard tools in VFX houses.Kramer was the keynote speaker at the last Adobe AE World. Here’s a brief snippet of his presentation.Currently, Andrew Kramer can frequently be found collaborating with director J.J. Abrams. He has produced title sequences for films and shows like Star Trek and Fringe. He is also working on the much anticipated Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens.You can follow and learn from Andrew Kramer on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and videocopilot.net.Larry JordanImage via Larry JordanLarry Jordan absolutely knows his stuff. He has experience as a television producer, director, and editor.  He is a member of the Directors Guild of America and Producers Guild of America. He is also an Apple-Certified trainer in digital media.The larryjordan.com website includes tons of educational information on video production. There are free tutorials on Final Cut Pro and Premiere Pro, recommended reading about video production, and a whole section dedicated to editing as a business.I believe that technology is inherently confusing for many people. So I work hard, in my writing and training, to make training less frightening and more understandable. On top of that, Larry releases a free weekly newsletter and weekly webinar. In his “spare time” he hosts and produces Digital Production BuZZ, a weekly podcast covering media production, post-production, and distribution. You can listen to the show live every Thursday night at 6pm PDT or listen the next day on iTunes or YouTube.You can follow and learn from Larry Jordan on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, LinkedIn, larryjordan.com, and digitalproductionbuzz.comDave DugdaleImage via Dave DugdaleWhen Dave Dugdale started making videos on DSLR cameras, he created the site Learning DSLR Video to take you along his journey. His goal was to educate you about his mistakes and the things he has learned. Dave has recently switched to mirrorless cameras, and thus renamed his site Learning Video.His site includes free tutorials, camera and gear reviews, and more. Dave also offers incredibly in-depth courses for sale, which are great for learning about a specific camera.Many of the great DP’s say the same thing, they all enjoy learning and still have much to learn. For these DP’s that have been shooting movies for decades to say that, then I know I will always be learning. I try to stay humble, and this is the reason why I called this site Learning Video, because no matter how good I get, I’ll always be learning.You can follow and learn from Dave Dugdale on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Vimeo, and learningvideo.comShane HurlbutImage via Hurlbut VisualsShane Hurlbut is a Director of Photography and member of the American Society of Cinematographers. He has worked on films like Act of Valor, We Are Marshall, and Need for Speed.He started the Hurlblog as a way to share his cinematography experience. The site includes an array of articles on cinematography, lenses and gear, lighting techniques, and all stages of the production workflow.He has always gone above and beyond to share his experiences. Even breaking down camera and lens options in a movie trailer spot.Recently he has started Shane’s Inner Circle, an in-depth look at filmmaking exclusively for members. Membership grants you behind-the-scenes access to his sets, classes on advanced theory, gear tests, camera profiles and LUTs, and a monthly podcast. He and his wife Lydia not only help filmmakers, but make it a priority to help local communities and global social causes.You can follow and learn from Shane Hurlbut on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Vimeo, Instagram, and hurlbutvisuals.comMitch MartinezImage via Mitch MartinezMitch Martinez has slowly been making quite the name for himself the past few years. He has a blog that covers all sorts of industry news, tutorials, product reviews, and some great behind-the-scenes pieces.The thing that’s garnered Martinez the most attention is his free stock footage. He has given away over 120GB of free 4k RED footage, as well as some free elements. These materials are free to use in any project. It also give schools the opportunity to use the footage in their curriculum, giving material to students to actively learn from.Image via Mitch MartinezLately, Martinez has gained a lot of attention for his incredible bullet-time rig. Not only did he use 50 cameras to capture these stunning images, he shows you how he did it.You can follow and learn from Mitch Martinez on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, Vimeo, and mitchmartinez.com.Author’s NoteThe genesis of this post came from a recent personal experience. If you’ve read any of my previous articles, you may notice that I shoot video with a drone. On a recent shoot, the handle on my drone case broke. It was just a design flaw.I looked into ordering a replacement part, only to discover that the manufacturer does not warranty the case – it came for free with the drone. Thus there was no replacement part to order. It turned out that this was a widespread problem. There were many users who were stuck with broken cases and no replacement parts.Seeing the opportunity to help fellow pilots, David Barwin began 3D printing replacement parts. There was no reason for him to do anything, but he stepped in to help out fellow filmmakers. So I gratefully ordered a set.Image via David BarwinAfter that experience, I just felt good. Someone had taken the opportunity to help other filmmakers. It made me think about the many filmmakers who have helped me, and those I have learned from over the years. Many still continue to help the filmmaking community.I would like to thank all of these filmmakers for their contributions to education over the years. Let’s keep building a great community to learn from and achieve great work.Let’s try to keep the good vibes going. Who are some video professionals that have helped you over the years? Who should be added to the list? Let us know in the comments below.last_img read more

WRITER DIRECTOR STAR – CATHERINE REITMAN IS A REAL LIFE WORKIN MOM

first_imgAdvertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Workin’ Moms sold to FX first, before they passed and the CBC snapped it up. How is producing TV in Canada different than in the States? Are there things you can do here that you can’t do there?Absolutely. Coming to Canada has been incredibly liberating, both creatively and production-wise for [my husband and co-producer/co-star] Philip and I. For one, we’re partners in the creation of our show, as opposed to the usual contact you’d get in the United States, where you’re an employee on a show of your own creation. So, being able to feel ownership not only is exhilarating because it’s yours, but also you feel so much more responsibility, you know? If the show fails or succeeds, it’s on you. Catherine Reitman is living that working mom life—hard. She is the showrunner on CBC’s comedy hit Workin’ Moms (which she produces with her husband Philip Sternberg); she also writes and directs for the show. Oh, and stars on it. In addition to her show baby, she has two little ones at home. (She also pops up on Black-ish from time to time.) Reitman has won fans among the mom brigade and beyond for her raw, honest portrayal of the trials and tribulations of motherhood, from postpartum depression to breastfeeding boobs. With season three premiering today, we spoke with Reitman about directing cranky old men, tackling #MeToo on-screen, and working with her hubs.What are some issues and experiences that you felt were missing from the modern TV landscape that you wanted to show on Workin’ Moms?I felt that there was a limited portrayal of how mothers appeared on television. When I first got pregnant, my husband and I were huge consumers of premium cable television, and we were watching all of these shows, and it would either be the B-storyline of a show like Homeland, where she’s a working mother, or you have even smaller C-storylines on a show like Mad Men. And when mother storylines were A-storylines, they felt either very broad or kind of melodramatic—I wanted to see the comedy that I was used to watching with my husband, but my story. And I couldn’t find that anywhere. Advertisement Twitter Facebook Advertisementlast_img read more