Nova Scotia deletes outdated spinster reference from marriage law

first_imgHALIFAX – Nova Scotia is modernizing its outdated marriage law by, among other things, removing references to spinsters and illegitimate children.As well, the new Marriage Act will be aligned with federal legislation by removing the authority for people under the age of 16 to marry.The province’s Liberal government says all religious references will be removed to make the law more inclusive.Marriage licences, which must be purchased before two people can marry, will now be valid for three months instead of one year — a change that will make the law consistent with other jurisdictions.Service Nova Scotia Minister Geoff MacLellan says identity security will be improved by requiring both people who wish to marry to complete a marriage licence affidavit.The legislation, which used to be called the Solemnization of Marriage Act, was introduced last fall and will come into effect on May 1.“We are making the act more inclusive and providing enhanced security to couples getting married in Nova Scotia,” MacLellan said in a statement released Wednesday.last_img read more

Womens volleyball Ohio State libero Valeria León record and barrier breaker

Senior libero Valeria Leon goes through her service routine during a match against Nebraska at St. John Arena on Oct. 14. Credit: Jenna Leinasars | Assistant News DirectorNearly 15 years ago, 7-year-old Valeria León and her older sister, Karina, were on their way to volleyball practice in their hometown of Ponce, Puerto Rico. León’s grandfather took them to practice, as he did every day. León started to develop a passion for the sport of volleyball, and she began to sleep with her volleyball at night. She had no idea she’d be holding a place in Ohio State history just a handful of years later.Last week, senior libero León grabbed the title for most career digs in the women’s volleyball program during a match against Michigan State, but her journey to the top hasn’t always been easy. In fact, it’s been her against the world in many cases.León’s love for volleyball continued into high school at Colegio Sagrado Corazón De Jesús, where she was recruited by OSU coach Geoff Carlston. He said she stood out to him for a lot of reasons, but it was her determination that won him over.“She made hard stuff look easy and easy stuff look easy, but really I gravitated to her competitive aura and how she played the game,” he said. Coming to the United States for college wasn’t León’s first choice, but she said her mother wholeheartedly believed in her talent as a player and encouraged her to give it a try. “My mom used to tell me, ‘Just try it and if you don’t like it, I’ll be the first one to buy you a ticket to come back,’” León said. On her official visit to OSU, she immediately committed. She said she was blown away by the campus’ atmosphere.  “I had other options, but I felt like Ohio State – it was the perfect one for me,” she said. At the time, León spoke little English, being a native Spanish speaker back in her Puerto Rican home. Everything was different in this new environment – communicating, learning and even some aspects of the game she had come to love were different. “I was dealing with so many outside things, like the language,” she said. “I had to go to tutoring for like eight hours every day because I couldn’t do the homework by myself.”Her team remembers it well. Being homesick while at college is one thing, but being homesick when your home is in another country is another. “She missed her family a lot. She missed home a lot. We all did, but it was different – she was in a completely new environment,” said senior middle blocker Kylie Randall. The team tried to support León in any way it could. Teammates walked her to classes, ordered food for her and took care of her like a sister, even though she had only been part of the OSU volleyball family for a short time.León could have given up and went back home where things were more familiar and comfortable, but she said when she finally decided to stick with it, she was thinking about more than just herself. “I had people behind me. They were excited and believed in me every single day, so I thought not giving up would make them proud,” she said. “People like my parents and my grandpa – he would go and drive me every single day to practice, and he never asked me for anything in return.”León also had her Buckeye family to rely on. Senior middle blocker Taylor Sandbothe said she, Randall and fellow freshman Maggie Heim spent nearly every weekend with León during that first year, and they were able to bond outside of St. John Arena. Through the constant support of those close to her, León stayed with the program, and with time, she developed into one of the team’s strongest assets and a powerful leader. “She made it a point to make sure her voice was heard, even if she couldn’t say what she wanted to say,” Sandbothe said. Carlston said that, from a coach’s perspective, León is what holds the rest of his team together. “She does the maintenance. (She’s) the glue,” he said. “She does a lot of things for us.” León’s journey soared to a new level on Oct. 22 of this year when she broke the 12-year-standing record for most career digs in OSU women’s volleyball history with 1,586, a record set by National Player of Year Stacey Gordon. She said to see herself come this far is something she would never have dreamed of. “When you sign here and come here, you never think about stuff like that (breaking records),” she said. “Those are maybe goals or dreams someone has, but it won’t actually happen.” Grabbing the title was even more sweet for León because her family in Puerto Rico was able to see her do it. “What really hits me the most is that in that game (against Michigan State), my family was together back home watching. Bringing my family together is something really special for me,” she said. León’s mom and dad are able to come to the U.S. three or four times a year to watch her play. When they can’t, they watch her games online along with the rest of her extended family – which, she said, could be up to 25 people at one time. León isn’t the only Buckeye receiving international support. Freshman outside hitter Bia Franklin hails from Rio de Janeiro. León said she shares a special connection with Franklin because when she looks at her, she is able to see herself three years ago. “I love talking to her and telling her my story because, for me, it’s really important that she stays here and doesn’t give up,” León said. León’s team said that she is an inspiration to everyone she touches, and her journey has transformed her into not only a stronger volleyball player, but a stronger individual. Sandbothe said, “Seeing her accomplish these kinds of things … makes me trust in the journey and trust in the process and know that if you have people in your corner, you really can do anything.”León said she wants to see other players learn from her story. Carlston attributes that quality to her selfless and humble personality.“For me, it’s really important once I leave, I want (the underclassmen) to know how Buckeye volleyball does it,” León said. When her days donning the Buckeyes’ libero jersey are over, León hopes to keep playing the game she loves – but closer to those who inspired her to push through tough times. “One of the reasons why I want to play professional is my other family members who haven’t gotten the opportunity to watch me play,” she said. “They can watch me play (in Ponce), especially like my grandpa, he means the world to me.” There’s one thing Sandbothe said she has taken away from knowing León, and it’s the belief in achieving the seemingly impossible.“Someone who can have so many things against them and just being in really low points where you didn’t know if you could see the light or when it was going to get better, and she never gave up,” she said. read more

Ohio State football finalizes 2013 schedule

The path to what some fans hope will be a national championship season is now set in stone as Ohio State football finalized its 2013 schedule Friday. Fifteen days after Vanderbilt canceled its trip to Columbus for next year, the Buckeyes added San Diego State for a Sept. 7 contest against the Aztecs in Ohio Stadium. “San Diego State has a fine football program and we are happy to be able to add them to our schedule,” OSU athletic director Gene Smith said in a released statement. “We have had an excellent relationship with SDSU over the years with three exciting, competitive games since 2001.” The 2013 game will be the fourth time the two teams have met since 2001. The Buckeyes, which hold a 3-0 advantage in the series, have outscored the Aztecs, 70-31 over the course of contests in 2001, 2003 and 2005. SDSU, which finds itself currently a member of the Mountain West Conference, will move to the Big East next season a long with fellow MWC member, Boise State. Other non-conference opponents for the 2012 season include Buffalo, Florida A&M and California. OSU continues its 2012 campaign against Illinois Saturday at 3:30 p.m. at Ohio Stadium. read more

Redknapp Mourinhos tactics might backfire against Liverpool

first_imgFormer Liverpool midfielder Jamie Redknapp believes Jose Mourinho’s old tricks won’t work this time around for Manchester UnitedThe Portuguese coach’s defensive tactics in the past at Anfield have secured United goalless draws in their last two visits.But Redknapp feels that Liverpool may just be too strong for United this time around for those kinds of tricks to work.“I am expecting Manchester United to try and do a number on Liverpool like they have done over the last couple of years,” Redknapp told Sky Sports.“They have done very well in those games, staying compact, not leaving any space in behind and making it uncomfortable – even unwatchable at times.“But I’ve just got a feeling that those tactics are not going to work this weekend. I think Liverpool have too much energy and speed for this United side. I think it’s inevitable that Liverpool will wear them down.Victor Wanyama, Tottenham Hotspur, Premier LeaguePochettino admits Wanyama remains in his Spurs plans Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Kenyan international, Victor Wanyama, was the protagonist of a summer transfer saga, but in the end, he is set to stay at Tottenham Hotspur.“The worry is that I don’t know if they have any other way of playing in these games. Jose doesn’t play the Manchester United way. He never has.“They are not going to do what Everton did at Anfield where they went and kept the ball and played on the front foot. I don’t think that’s how Mourinho will set up his team.“You can see a situation where he will play Marouane Fellaini, Ander Herrera and Nemanja Matic in midfield and look to stop Liverpool.“But that was the midfield that played against Manchester City and look what happened there. They were outclassed.”The Liverpool-United match will begin at 17:00 (CET) at Anfield today.last_img read more

KPBSD Receives Grant To Reinstate Petroleum Academy

first_imgKPBSD Superintendent Sean Dusek announced that the school district was awarded a grant from the Alaska Community Foundation, in order to reinstate the Petroleum Academy program. Dusek: “Our students are able to earn industry level certifications, those types of things that are very pertinent to kids working in those particularly industries.” Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Kenai Peninsula Students will once again have the opportunity to earn industry certifications in Kenai, from the Alaska Petroleum Academy. Dusek: “We talk a lot about our academic achievement, but we do focus quiet a bit on career and technical education.” Certifications offered include: 16 Hour Petroleum Health & Safety, 24 Hour CITS Certification, 40 Hour Hazwoper Certification, Confined Space Entry Certification, and numerous other courses. Classes are be held at the Workforce Development building on the Kenai Spur Highway. For information and class scheduling call 907-953-2255 or send an email to mikegallagher2@yahoo.com Story as aired: Audio PlayerJennifer-on-Petro-Academy-Grant.mp3VmJennifer-on-Petro-Academy-Grant.mp300:00RPdlast_img read more

Historic 6Point Day today

first_imgBangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman. Photo: BSSThe historic Six-Point Day, marking the demand for autonomy for the then East Pakistan, now Bangladesh, is being observed on Friday across the country in a befitting manner.On 7 June in 1966, father of the nation Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman launched a massive movement against the misrule of the Pakistanis on the basis of the six-point demand, the Magna Carta of the Bengalis demanding autonomy for the then east Pakistan.Eleven people, including Manu Mian, Shafique and Shamsul Haque, were gunned down by the police and paramilitary EPR on 7 June 1966 in Dhaka and Narayanganj during a hartal called for the release of Bangabandhu and other leaders detained for launching the Six-Point Movement against the then barbaric ruling clique.Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman launched his historic six-point political and economic programme in Lahore on 5 February in 1966, aiming at attaining greater autonomy for the then East Pakistan in the backdrop of exploitation and discrimination by the then Pakistani rulers.The six-point demands were – creating provision in the constitution for a Federation of Pakistan in its true sense based on the Lahore resolution, the federal government will deal with only two subjects: defence and foreign affairs, introduction of two separate, but freely convertible currencies for East and West Pakistan, vesting the power of taxation and revenue collection with the federating units, maintaining two separate accounts for the foreign exchange earnings of the two wings and creation a separate militia or paramilitary force for East Pakistan.President M Abdul Hamid and prime minister Sheikh Hasina have issued separate messages on the eve of the six-point day.In his message, president Hamid paid rich tributes to the memories of father of the nation Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman and all who embraced martyrdom to implement the six-point demand.Terming the historic six-point demand the milestone in the country’s long struggle for independence, he said through the six-point demand, Bangabandhu presented political, economic, social and cultural interests of East Bengal.The president said the six-point demand contained the framework of independence and autonomy of Bangalee nation.After the announcement of six-point demand, the president said the Pakistani rulers repeatedly arrested Bangabandhu and tortured him inhumanly, which could not deter him from the path of movement.In her message, prime minister Sheikh Hasina said the present government is firmly committed to keep intact the democratic right of the people imbued with the spirit of all democratic movements and struggles, including the historic 7 June.She said the historic 7 June is an unforgettable and significant day in the history of Bangladesh.“The historic movement for six-point demand, declared by greatest Bengali of all time Bangabandhu, took an important turn on 7 June, 1966,” she said.The PM said police and the then EPR had opened fire on unarmed people during the movement announced by Awami League to realize the six-point demand, the charter of freedom of Bangalee nation.Eleven people including Manu Mian, Shafique and Shamsul Haque in Dhaka and Narayanganj had embraced martyrdom on that day, she addedThe prime minister showed profound respect to the memories of all martyrs of the struggle for independence including those of the 7 June.She vowed to materialise the dream of the martyrs of 7 June turning the country into a middle income one by 2021 and developed one by 2041.To mark the day, different socio-political organisations including Awami League, its associate bodies and like-minded socio-cultural organisations have drawn up elaborate programmes.The Awami League’s programmes include hoisting of the national and party flags atop Bangabandhu Bhaban at Dhanmondi and central office in the capital and all unit offices across the country.Leaders and workers of Awami League and its front organisations will place floral wreaths at the portrait of Bangabandhu at Bangabandhu Bhaban at Dhanmondi around 9.30am.AL general secretary Obaidul Quader in a statement urged all, including party men, to observe the day across the country in a befitting manner.last_img read more

Ward 8 Dems Dont Endorse in Chairman AtLarge Race

first_imgBy James Wright, Special to the AFRO, jwright@afro.comThe chairman of the D.C. Council, and one of the at-large council members, didn’t receive an endorsement from one of the most influential political organizations in the District of Columbia.On April 21, the Ward 8 Democrats held their endorsement meeting for the positions of the District Attorney General, chairman of the D.C. Council, and the Democratic at-large seat on the council at the D.C. Vehicle for Hire Department in the ward. Ward 8 Democratic voters were eligible to cast ballots for the three positions and there were members of the D.C. Democratic State Committee members from other wards to police the process and see that it ran smoothly.Anita Bonds is running for re-election as a Democratic at-large council member. (AFRO File Photo)The voting took place from 12-2 p.m.The endorsements are for the June 19 Democratic primary. The winner of the Democratic primary for the three positions are favorites to win the Nov. 6 general election because the city is 74 percent Democratic, according to D.C. Board of Elections statistics.For a candidate to receive an endorsement from the Ward 8 Democrats, they needed to get 60 percent of the votes that were cast. In this instance, a candidate would have had to get 46 votes out of the 78 cast.D.C. Council member Anita Bonds (D-At Large) is running for re-election to a second full term. Bonds is running against Ward 8 activist Aaron Holmes, environmental leader Jeremiah Lowery and real estate professional Marcus Goodwin in the June 19 Democratic Party primary.Bonds got 33 votes, 13 short of the endorsement while Holmes got 21, Goodwin received 12 and Lowery had eight. Despite not getting the Ward 8 Democrats nod, Bonds told the AFRO she was satisfied with the result.“I am pleased that I came and participated,” she said. “I would note that one of my opponents came from this ward and I got more votes than he did.”WHO IS SHE TALKING ABOUT?Goodwin credited the leadership of the Ward 8 Democrats for having an open process. “The result was nothing profound to me but I take my hat off to the Ward 8 Democrats for giving the candidates a fair opportunity,” he said to the AFRO. Goodwin noted that the late Marion Barry, the four-term mayor and elected four times to represent the ward on the D.C. Council, would have supported Bonds and she would have gotten the endorsement outright because of his influence.During the council candidates’ forum that took place during the voting, all agreed that more affordable housing is needed in the District and the educational system is due for major improvements. They also agreed that the District should have a state-of the art hospital in its East End and not a jail, whether it is publicly or privately financed.In the chairman’s race, D.C. Council Chair Phil Mendelson came up three votes shy of winning the endorsement. However, there are three provisional ballots that need to be counted and they have the potential to earn the chairman the endorsement.Former D.C. Fiscal Policy Institute leader Ed Lazere had 20 votes to perennial candidate Calvin Gurley, the only African American in the race, who got eight. District Attorney General Karl Racine has no opponent in the Democratic primary and easily got past the 60 percent threshold.last_img read more

Researchers devise a new way to plot circadian clock

first_img Citation: Researchers devise a new way to plot circadian clock (2012, August 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-08-plot-circadian-clock.html Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Explore further Manipulating plants’ circadian clock may make all-season crops possible © 2012 Phys.org (Phys.org)—Everyone has an internal clock, that mysterious process which controls sleeping and hunger patterns, but now researchers are finding out that because the internal clock also controls metabolism, it would be helpful to be able to easily chart out a person’s personal rhythm because it appears many drugs work better or worse at certain stages of their cycle. Until now, charting out a person’s clock has involved taking blood samples every twenty minutes or so over a twenty four hour period and measuring melatonin levels. Now new research by a team in Japan has found what appears to be an easier way. They measure, as they describe in their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, certain metabolites using just two blood samples over a 12 hour period to prduce an accurate clock. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The team based their research on an idea by botanist Carolus Linnaeus, who suggested that a bio or flower clock could be made by observing the opening and closing times of different types of flowers and planting them amongst one another. A person could theoretically use the flowers to discern the correct time by noting which were open.Instead of flowers opening and closing, the researchers focused on metabolite (substances that take part in metabolism) levels which tend to rise and fall throughout the day. To find out which ones could be used to chart a circadian clock, the researchers enlisted six volunteers to live in a controlled environment for two weeks where their metabolites could be closely monitored. In so doing they identified several metabolites they believed would allow for plotting out a person’s circadian clock with just a few samples taken.To test their idea, they next took just two blood samples from three different male volunteers over a thirty six hour period, and found that in measuring the metabolites they had singled out previously, that they were able to chart out their internal clocks as accurately as could be done using the melatonin level test.Of course tests with much larger groups of subjects will have to be undertaken before the metabolite method of plotting a person’s circadian clock can be proven to be useful, but this study does suggest that there are better and easier ways to get it done with the hope that one day, it will become a routine part of a patient’s health care, leading to better results when taking medications and perhaps a better night’s sleep. More information: Human blood metabolite timetable indicates internal body time, PNAS, Published online before print August 27, 2012, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1207768109AbstractA convenient way to estimate internal body time (BT) is essential for chronotherapy and time-restricted feeding, both of which use body-time information to maximize potency and minimize toxicity during drug administration and feeding, respectively. Previously, we proposed a molecular timetable based on circadian-oscillating substances in multiple mouse organs or blood to estimate internal body time from samples taken at only a few time points. Here we applied this molecular-timetable concept to estimate and evaluate internal body time in humans. We constructed a 1.5-d reference timetable of oscillating metabolites in human blood samples with 2-h sampling frequency while simultaneously controlling for the confounding effects of activity level, light, temperature, sleep, and food intake. By using this metabolite timetable as a reference, we accurately determined internal body time within 3 h from just two anti-phase blood samples. Our minimally invasive, molecular-timetable method with human blood enables highly optimized and personalized medicine.last_img read more

Khalin Joshi wins Ahmedabad Masters

first_imgBangalore’s Khalin Joshi shot a course record of nine-under 63 on the final day to register a sensational come-from-behind victory at the PGTI Ahmedabad Masters golf championship on Friday.last_img