Robinson, Blais unveil plans for student government

first_imgCorey Robinson said in some ways, his two roles on campus — student body president and a student assistant to the football team — can be similar. Both allow him to help others reach their goals.“Here at Notre Dame, we have world changers,” Robinson said. “And we’re just trying to put them in the best position to be successful.”Photo courtesy of Becca Blais After a summer of brainstorming and organizing, student government is ready for the new school year, Robinson said. He and student body vice president Becca Blais have plans to roll out a number of new initiatives this semester. And they’ve got big ideas for big events.For the upcoming presidential election, for example, student government will host a campus-wide debate over policy points, with representatives from the College Republicans and College Democrats, followed by a mock election.“We hope to have a big turnout because it’s going to be what everyone’s talking about,” Blais said.The group plans to continue to build upon and improve some of the main points from their campaign platform last winter. That’s why they’re here, Robinson said.“It’s the reason we ran and the reason all of our cabinet’s here — to serve the student body,” he said.InnovationThe administration hopes to help student entrepreneurs build and execute their ideas, Robinson said, with the help of two main initiatives: the Student Venture Incubation Program and a Shark Tank-style innovation competition scheduled for Oct. 10.“At Notre Dame, we’re so centrally focused on service and this idea of making a difference in your community, creating social good wherever you are,” Robinson said. “And entrepreneurship has often been pitched as making money.”But student government hopes to pitch it as a way for students to use their ideas to make a difference in others’ lives.“I think we will have a huge take up,” Robinson said. “Because that’s what Notre Dame students are all about.”The incubation program, led by senior Cornelius McGrath, aims to give student entrepreneurs access to financial resources, material resources and mentors. The project will start this semester, with a group of 18 to 22 students identified by McGrath and his staff who will work to develop their student-run businesses over the course of the term.Similarly, student government plans to promote innovation by asking students with ideas to promote social good in their communities — local or far away — to enter them in the upcoming competition.Robinson, a San Antonio native, said a student could propose a financial literacy course — an example he thinks would create a tangible improvement in his hometown. The student with the winning idea will work with the University to create an online course of sorts to be accessed by people from the target area.“MIT, USC, Northwestern, Chicago — they all push innovation,” Robinson said. “We’re going to do the same, but the Notre Dame way.”SafetyThe administration launched SafeBouND, a version of the free campus transportation service, in an email to students Tuesday. Robinson said they decided to rebrand the program, formerly known as O’SNAP, to reinforce the mission of the service: safety.“A lot of people didn’t understand what O’SNAP was for,” he said. “We’re trying to help students understand the whole point — that this is a safety shuttle service for students trying to walk back to their dorms on campus.”Students can call or use the SafeBouND app to request assistance during the service’s new hours, adjusted around parietals. According to the email sent to the student body, golf carts will only be used Sunday-Wednesday, and walking escorts will be available Thursday-Saturday.Robinson said Student Government is also working to bring a trained Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) to campus for the spring semester, though they had initially tried to have something ready for the fall.“There’s been some unexpected push back, for multiple reasons,” he said. “The problem with the rape kits is you need to have a lot of experience before you administer it.”“You get one shot,” Blais added.Student government will implement two new measures aimed at improving safety and community on campus: a sexual assault survivor support group and a faculty ambassador program, which will allow professors to volunteer as sexual assault reporting resources.The survivor group is the first of it’s kind, Blais said, and was organized by senior Grace Watkins, University policy liaison.Robinson said faculty members participating in the ambassador program will be non-confidential reporting resources, who likely undergo some sort of training.“A lot of people don’t feel comfortable talking to administrators about sexual assault,” he said. “We want to continue to be able to break down those doors and barriers, and I think this is a great first step.”InclusionFor the first time, student government is planning Race Relations Week, a four-day series aimed to create conversation about race and its role on campus.The week — which will run Oct. 24 through Oct. 27 — will examine race in relation to psychology, the presidential election, sexual assault and opportunity. Events will feature a number of speakers and discussions with the ultimate goal of garnering interest and reflection on issues surrounding race.“Race relations and the campus climate surrounding them haven’t ever been examined like this,” Robinson said.Student government also planned a tailgate for the Nevada game targeting freshmen who may not have a number of tailgates to jump back and forth between.“We wanted to provide a safe, no pressure, fun tailgate that the entire student body would have access to,” Blais said. “So we came up with this.”The event will take place on the quad between DeBartolo Hall and Eck Hall of Law on Sept. 10.In the spirit of involving students, Robinson said he and Blais have an “open door policy.”“Come in any time you want,” he said.Student government has also launched an Instagram account and Snapchat for people to follow along with their plans and events. They plan to release a monthly newsletter, highlighting different departments and initiatives.“We’re excited that everyone’s back — because over the summer, campus was kind of lonely,” Robinson said. “And I’m excited to wake up every morning to do this.”Tags: Becca Blais, Corey Robinson, Student governmentlast_img read more

Liverpool get the green light to play at Anfield

first_img The source claims that initial talks between Deputy Chief Constable Roberts and Liverpool were positive and they felt a resolution would be reached in due course. read also:Balotelli’s training habits a ‘disgrace’, says ex-Liverpool striker Specific plans for how to control possible fan gatherings around the stadium or in the city are not yet available. But a firm plan should be in place in the coming weeks. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… Liverpool will be allowed to host their home games at Anfield when play resumes. Jurgen Klopp There was some contention about whether Merseyside Police would accept matches at the club’s home stadium, as there are fears about fans gathering in mass when Liverpool win the league. But the mirror suggests the authorities are happy enough with the plans in place to ensure there are no disruptions.Advertisementcenter_img Promoted Content10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoWho’s The Best Car Manufacturer Of All Time?Who Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?Is This The Most Delicious Food In The World?Best & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Made7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend BetterA Soviet Shot Put Thrower’s Record Hasn’t Been Beaten To This Day6 Incredibly Strange Facts About Hurricanes2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This YearWill You Recognize Celebs In Their Kid Photos?Mind-Bending Technology That Was Predicted Before It AppearedSuperhero Castings That People Hated But Were Amazinglast_img read more

Advocaat replaces Poyet as coach at Sunderland

first_imgSunderland are banking on the guide of Dick Advocaat to save them from relegation after the English Premier League strugglers appointed the Dutchman as head coach until the end of the season on Tuesday.The club, who sacked Gus Poyet on Monday following a poor run of results that culminated in a 4-0 home thrashing by Aston Villa on Saturday, are one point and one place clear of the relegation zone with nine matches remaining.”Sunderland is a big club and I am very much looking forward to the challenge ahead. We must now concentrate on Saturday as a priority and I can’t wait to get started,” the former Dutch national coach said in a statement on the club website (www.safc.com).Sunderland chairman Ellis Short said: “Dick has an incredible CV and vast experience of managing at the very highest level. We have one aim only now — to climb the table and everyone is fully focused on the task ahead of us.”Poyet departed following a run of one win in 12 league matches which has left the club in danger of relegation after eight seasons in the Premier League.Advocaat’s immediate aim will be to win at West Ham United on Saturday. The 67-year-old becomes the oldest manager in the Premier League but has no previous experience of working in England, although he did lead Rangers to successive Scottish titles in 1999 and 2000 and is one of the most experienced and respected coaches in the game.As well as coaching the Netherlands, he has also coached the national teams of the United Arab Emirates, South Korea, Belgium, Russia and Serbia.At club level, he has coached Borussia Moenchengladbach, Zenit St Petersburg, AZ Alkmaar and PSV Eindhoven as well as Rangers.But his appointment represents something of a gamble for Short because, historically speaking, changing managers so late in the season, rarely has any major effect on the team.Since the Premier League started in 1992-93, only 14 managers have been appointed on March 17 or later while all six clubs who were in the relegation zone when the new man came in still went down. Advocaat had been out of a job since last November following an unsuccessful four-month spell in charge of Serbia. He quit after a 3-1 home defeat by Denmark left them with only a forlorn hope of reaching next year’s 24-team tournament in France.last_img read more