Meet Rex Singh, 1st cricketer from Manipur to be selected in India U-19 team

first_imgManipur is not only known for its scenic beauty but has also given some incredible sports stars who have made the nation proud with their commendable performances. Rajkumar Rex Singh is one such person who has made the region proud by becoming the first cricketer to be selected in the Indian cricket team’s under-19 squad. Singh was recently picked for a test match against South Africa.Manipur is known as a powerhouse of sports. The region has produced many players who have participated globally and have made the nation proud through their achievements. Away from the glitz and glamour of the Indian Premier League, history is being written in one of the newest centers of Indian cricket.The 18-year-old left arm pacer is the first cricketer from the state to feature in an Indian side ever.”I got a call from the BCCI for verification and after that, I got an official call from Mumbai Cricket Association (MCA). I am very happy and proud to be part of the Under-19 team,” said Singh.Born and raised in Sagolband Moirang Hanuba village, Singh’s journey to cricket began with a tennis ball in a tiny ground near his house at the age of 11 years. However, his talent was first noticed by Ph Rohendro Singh, who is also Singh’s current coach.It was not long before Singh’s first notable performance came in. In 2014 in Ranchi, he picked up a five-wicket haul against Bihar U-16 (Associate and Affiliated Tournament). Singh said he is thankful to his father, who is a truck driver in Imphal, for supporting him financially. Though he feels that cricket is an expensive game, the budding player says he is happy that he made his parents proud.advertisement”I was expecting that someday he will do great. At a very tender age, he started practicing cricket and I am really happy that my son is now doing great in Cricket. He would often practice in the tiny ground,” said R.K. Doren, father of Singh.Singh recalled that bowling at the age of 10-11 years with a leather ball helped him a lot and said that his coach guided him well on how to hold the ball and the importance of wrist position.”I was supposed to leave school but I will complete my education. So I will finish my 12th standard and graduation. I belong to a poor family so sometimes I struggle,” said Singh.Singh made headlines in December last year after claiming all 10 wickets in an innings in the Under-19 Cooch Behar Trophy match against Arunachal Pradesh in Ananthpur which he says is his favourite cricketing moment. His ability to swing the ball was also compared with veteran Indian pacer Irfan Pathan.”Being a mother, I put a lot of effort to train him. Like ensuring that he comes back and eat on time. Being a mother, I feel that the role of a mother is very important to train a child,” said Singh’s mother Renubala Devi.Also Read | 10 wickets in an innings: Manipur teen Rex Rajkumar Singh achieves rare featAlso Read | Pakistan U-19 tour of Sri Lanka cancelledlast_img read more

9 days ago​Gilmour reveals Lampard advice before Chelsea debut

first_imgAbout the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your say ​Gilmour reveals Lampard advice before Chelsea debutby Ansser Sadiq9 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveBilly Gilmour has spoken about the advice that he received from Frank Lampard before making his Chelsea debut.The 18-year-old got his chance to shine with the senior side against Sheffield United in August. He came off the bench in the 2-2 draw.Gilmour has now revealed the words he exchanged with boss Lampard before the match.”The night before, the gaffer kept asking if my family were coming down and saying make sure they come,” the Scotland U21 international told reporters.”We were 2-0 up and I’m thinking ‘this could be good’, but it was 2-1 when I came on. “That shows you how much trust he has in the younger players to put you on in such a tight game.”It finished 2-2, which wasn’t the result I hoped for, but it made my dream come true of playing in the Premier League.” last_img read more

Deleting Highway of Tears emails a slap in the face to families

first_imgAPTN National NewsA report by the British Columbia privacy commissioner shows that senior government officials were deleting emails about the Highway of Tears.That has a coalition of missing and murdered women groups demanding accountability.APTN’s Tina House has the story.last_img

Man running from Alaska to Florida passing through Fort St John this

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Run Pete Run! A man who has made it his goal to run from Alaska to Florida will be making his way through the Energetic City this Saturday.American born Peter Kostelnick is in the 30th day of his historically long journey. The man is running 65-110 kilometres per day and hopes to reach Key West, Florida by early November.Kostelnick, who was in Pink Mountain this morning, will be one of the first ever to run the entirety of the Alaska Highway. Two years ago Kostelnick broke the world record for running across America in just 42 days, six hours and 30 minutes, beating the previous record by four whole days. He has also won the Badwater 135 twice, a race regarded as the “toughest footrace on the planet.” Kostelnick’s current run is completely self-supported which means he is pushing a stroller with his gear and food. He also enjoys company so residents are encouraged to join his run as he passes through Fort St. John.Residents can track Kostelnick’s location via his Strava on petesfeetaa.com. Anyone interested in learning more on his journey can click here.last_img read more

Huskies Fill The Bus Food Drive huge success

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The 21st Annual Huskies Fill The Bus Food Drive was a huge success on Sunday as volunteers collected food items for the Salvation Army.Members of the Fort St. John Huskies, along with other volunteers, went around town collecting non-perishable food items for the Food Bank. Once the items were collected, they were brought back to the North Peace Arena to be sorted and packed into boxes.After being packed, the boxes were loaded into the Huskies coach bus and delivered to the Salvation Army. Packed boxes as they awaited to be loaded onto the bus. Photo by Scott BrooksCampaign Organizer, Allen Karasiuk, says the Food Drive was a big success.“The Food Drive was very successful this year as we did significantly better this year than last. As usual, the community was extremely generous in their donations to the Salvation Army Food Bank. In particular, ConocoPhillips was a lead corporate sponsor with a $1500 donation and the Burgher family (Paul, Mollie and Teri) donated approximately two pickup truckloads of food. The kids at Alwin Holland Elementary School also collected a significant amount of food.”Karasiuk also says they had approximately 60 volunteers to help out with the campaign.Cameron Eggie, Executive Director for the Fort St. John Salvation Army says the timing for Food Drive is perfect as they prepare for food hampers.“It’s really going to have an impact on our community over the Christmas season. We already have 140 people registered for food hampers in the community that we will be giving out in mid-December. So, the timing of this Food Drive is perfect because it comes right into when we have to prepare these food hampers.”last_img read more

Bombs kill two in Egypt’s Sinai: army

first_imgCAIRO – Militants set off four roadside bombs targeting a security convoy in Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula on Tuesday, killing two people and wounding five, the army said.The convoy was travelling from Rafah, on the Gaza border, towards the North Sinai provincial capital El-Arish further west, when the bombers struck.Militants then traded fire with security forces before fleeing, army spokesman Colonel Ahmed Ali said on his official Facebook page. One member of the security forces and a civilian were killed, and five security personnel wounded, Ali said.The army has poured troops and armour into the Sinai to try to crush militant activity, which has surged since it overthrew Islamist president Mohamed Morsi on July 3.A subsequent crackdown on Islamists has resulted in more than 1,000 people being killed and more than 2,000 arrested nationwide.In the Sinai, dozens of soldiers and policemen have been killed in near daily attacks.Since Morsi’s ouster, attacks have also targeted Egypt’s interior minister as well as Christian homes and churches.An Al-Qaeda-inspired group in the Sinai, Ansar Beit al-Maqdis, said it was responsible for a car bombing on Saturday in the Suez Canal city of Ismailiya that wounded six soldiers and a failed attempt to assassinate the interior minister last month.The military says it has killed or captured dozens of Islamist militants, some of whom proclaim allegiance to Al-Qaeda.last_img read more

Norfolk State Rewards NCAA BracketBusting Coach

Norfolk State’s Anthony Evans earned a raise.The most talked-about story of 2012 March Madness was historically black Norfolk State University, a 15th seed, knocking off No. 2-seed Missouri, 86-84  in the first round of the tournament. The Spartans from Norfolk, Virginia were on the minds of all college basketball fans around the country.This week, the school rewarded the orchestrator of the MEAC champions. Coach Anthony Evans received a thre-year contract extension will take him through the 2016-17 season, according to NSU athletic director Marty Miller.Evans led the Spartans to a school-record 26 wins, the MEAC Tournament championship and the huge NCAA Tournament win, the first in Norfolk State history.Evans, who is 78-82 record in his five seasons at Norfolk State, also received a $50,000 raise to $175,000. His contract was to expire after the 2013-14 season.After beating Mizzou, NSU lost, 84-50, to Florida in the next round. read more

Womens volleyball Ohio State libero Valeria León record and barrier breaker

Senior libero Valeria Leon goes through her service routine during a match against Nebraska at St. John Arena on Oct. 14. Credit: Jenna Leinasars | Assistant News DirectorNearly 15 years ago, 7-year-old Valeria León and her older sister, Karina, were on their way to volleyball practice in their hometown of Ponce, Puerto Rico. León’s grandfather took them to practice, as he did every day. León started to develop a passion for the sport of volleyball, and she began to sleep with her volleyball at night. She had no idea she’d be holding a place in Ohio State history just a handful of years later.Last week, senior libero León grabbed the title for most career digs in the women’s volleyball program during a match against Michigan State, but her journey to the top hasn’t always been easy. In fact, it’s been her against the world in many cases.León’s love for volleyball continued into high school at Colegio Sagrado Corazón De Jesús, where she was recruited by OSU coach Geoff Carlston. He said she stood out to him for a lot of reasons, but it was her determination that won him over.“She made hard stuff look easy and easy stuff look easy, but really I gravitated to her competitive aura and how she played the game,” he said. Coming to the United States for college wasn’t León’s first choice, but she said her mother wholeheartedly believed in her talent as a player and encouraged her to give it a try. “My mom used to tell me, ‘Just try it and if you don’t like it, I’ll be the first one to buy you a ticket to come back,’” León said. On her official visit to OSU, she immediately committed. She said she was blown away by the campus’ atmosphere.  “I had other options, but I felt like Ohio State – it was the perfect one for me,” she said. At the time, León spoke little English, being a native Spanish speaker back in her Puerto Rican home. Everything was different in this new environment – communicating, learning and even some aspects of the game she had come to love were different. “I was dealing with so many outside things, like the language,” she said. “I had to go to tutoring for like eight hours every day because I couldn’t do the homework by myself.”Her team remembers it well. Being homesick while at college is one thing, but being homesick when your home is in another country is another. “She missed her family a lot. She missed home a lot. We all did, but it was different – she was in a completely new environment,” said senior middle blocker Kylie Randall. The team tried to support León in any way it could. Teammates walked her to classes, ordered food for her and took care of her like a sister, even though she had only been part of the OSU volleyball family for a short time.León could have given up and went back home where things were more familiar and comfortable, but she said when she finally decided to stick with it, she was thinking about more than just herself. “I had people behind me. They were excited and believed in me every single day, so I thought not giving up would make them proud,” she said. “People like my parents and my grandpa – he would go and drive me every single day to practice, and he never asked me for anything in return.”León also had her Buckeye family to rely on. Senior middle blocker Taylor Sandbothe said she, Randall and fellow freshman Maggie Heim spent nearly every weekend with León during that first year, and they were able to bond outside of St. John Arena. Through the constant support of those close to her, León stayed with the program, and with time, she developed into one of the team’s strongest assets and a powerful leader. “She made it a point to make sure her voice was heard, even if she couldn’t say what she wanted to say,” Sandbothe said. Carlston said that, from a coach’s perspective, León is what holds the rest of his team together. “She does the maintenance. (She’s) the glue,” he said. “She does a lot of things for us.” León’s journey soared to a new level on Oct. 22 of this year when she broke the 12-year-standing record for most career digs in OSU women’s volleyball history with 1,586, a record set by National Player of Year Stacey Gordon. She said to see herself come this far is something she would never have dreamed of. “When you sign here and come here, you never think about stuff like that (breaking records),” she said. “Those are maybe goals or dreams someone has, but it won’t actually happen.” Grabbing the title was even more sweet for León because her family in Puerto Rico was able to see her do it. “What really hits me the most is that in that game (against Michigan State), my family was together back home watching. Bringing my family together is something really special for me,” she said. León’s mom and dad are able to come to the U.S. three or four times a year to watch her play. When they can’t, they watch her games online along with the rest of her extended family – which, she said, could be up to 25 people at one time. León isn’t the only Buckeye receiving international support. Freshman outside hitter Bia Franklin hails from Rio de Janeiro. León said she shares a special connection with Franklin because when she looks at her, she is able to see herself three years ago. “I love talking to her and telling her my story because, for me, it’s really important that she stays here and doesn’t give up,” León said. León’s team said that she is an inspiration to everyone she touches, and her journey has transformed her into not only a stronger volleyball player, but a stronger individual. Sandbothe said, “Seeing her accomplish these kinds of things … makes me trust in the journey and trust in the process and know that if you have people in your corner, you really can do anything.”León said she wants to see other players learn from her story. Carlston attributes that quality to her selfless and humble personality.“For me, it’s really important once I leave, I want (the underclassmen) to know how Buckeye volleyball does it,” León said. When her days donning the Buckeyes’ libero jersey are over, León hopes to keep playing the game she loves – but closer to those who inspired her to push through tough times. “One of the reasons why I want to play professional is my other family members who haven’t gotten the opportunity to watch me play,” she said. “They can watch me play (in Ponce), especially like my grandpa, he means the world to me.” There’s one thing Sandbothe said she has taken away from knowing León, and it’s the belief in achieving the seemingly impossible.“Someone who can have so many things against them and just being in really low points where you didn’t know if you could see the light or when it was going to get better, and she never gave up,” she said. read more

Opinion 4 remaining NBA playoff teams a breath of fresh air

Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James is seen before tipoff of overtime of a game between the Cavs and the San Antonio Spurs. The Cavs beat the Spurs, 128-125. Credit: Courtesy of TNSIn the last 30 NBA Finals, eight teams have hoisted the trophy.Just think about that for a second. Eight teams in 30 Finals.Eighteen teams have won the World Series in that span (and there wasn’t even a Series played in 1994). Sixteen squads have won the Super Bowl since 1984, as well.But in the NBA, if you’re not the Boston Celtics, Los Angeles Lakers, Detroit Pistons, Chicago Bulls, Houston Rockets, San Antonio Spurs, Miami Heat or Dallas Mavericks, you have not felt the thrill of victory since the season before Michael Jordan entered the league.This year, thankfully, it seems as though a ninth member will join this exclusive club.Of the four teams remaining — the Cleveland Cavaliers, Atlanta Hawks, Golden State Warriors and Rockets — only Houston has won it in the last 30 years. The Rockets appear to be the most unlikely team to make it to the Finals, having to face a lethal Warriors squad. In an ESPN.com poll, each of the 14 experts surveyed picked the Warriors to advance to the Finals.Of course, if the Los Angeles Clippers hadn’t collapsed and blown a 3-1 lead against Houston, we would already be guaranteed a fresh champion.But, nonetheless, if the Rockets fall to Golden State as expected, we will finally see someone new celebrating.It’s hard to call LeBron James in the Finals “new” — after appearing in the previous four Finals with the Heat, winning twice — but the Cavs, one of 13 teams to never win a championship, winning it all would certainly be something we haven’t seen before.The Warriors, meanwhile, won their last title in 1975, while the Hawks have the second-longest drought of any team — last winning in 1958 when they played in St. Louis. In fact, the Hawks have not even been back to the Finals since 1961, and never in Atlanta.So, with three of the 22 teams shut out from the last 30 years of parades still alive, you really couldn’t ask for more from a competitive standpoint.It truly is stunning when you look at that 22-of-30 figure. The simple explanation is the NBA is a league driven by the greats, and there are only so many of those to go around. Each of the last 30 champions, except for the 2003-04 Pistons, featured at least one player who can easily be categorized as one of the greatest of all time.With that in mind, LeBron and the Cavs would have to be considered the favorite as the only team to feature a true legend of the game.That’s not to mean any disrespect to the Warriors’ Stephen Curry, the league’s Most Valuable Player. While a strong case can already be made for him being the greatest shooter ever, he has a long way to go after really emerging this season before being classified as great.It’s also not to remove hope from the Hawks. As the Pistons showed in the 2004 Finals, you can win it all with a team full of good players, but no greats. It’s just really, really difficult.So, looking at the overall picture, it seems like, from a historical standpoint, the Cavs are the most likely team to win it all. LeBron winning his third title in five years also happens to be the least adventurous result — which seems to be the NBA way.Though, knowing the nearly impossible climb to becoming a championship team in the NBA, maybe the Rockets will find a way to add their third title since 1984 after all. read more

Redknapp Mourinhos tactics might backfire against Liverpool

first_imgFormer Liverpool midfielder Jamie Redknapp believes Jose Mourinho’s old tricks won’t work this time around for Manchester UnitedThe Portuguese coach’s defensive tactics in the past at Anfield have secured United goalless draws in their last two visits.But Redknapp feels that Liverpool may just be too strong for United this time around for those kinds of tricks to work.“I am expecting Manchester United to try and do a number on Liverpool like they have done over the last couple of years,” Redknapp told Sky Sports.“They have done very well in those games, staying compact, not leaving any space in behind and making it uncomfortable – even unwatchable at times.“But I’ve just got a feeling that those tactics are not going to work this weekend. I think Liverpool have too much energy and speed for this United side. I think it’s inevitable that Liverpool will wear them down.Victor Wanyama, Tottenham Hotspur, Premier LeaguePochettino admits Wanyama remains in his Spurs plans Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Kenyan international, Victor Wanyama, was the protagonist of a summer transfer saga, but in the end, he is set to stay at Tottenham Hotspur.“The worry is that I don’t know if they have any other way of playing in these games. Jose doesn’t play the Manchester United way. He never has.“They are not going to do what Everton did at Anfield where they went and kept the ball and played on the front foot. I don’t think that’s how Mourinho will set up his team.“You can see a situation where he will play Marouane Fellaini, Ander Herrera and Nemanja Matic in midfield and look to stop Liverpool.“But that was the midfield that played against Manchester City and look what happened there. They were outclassed.”The Liverpool-United match will begin at 17:00 (CET) at Anfield today.last_img read more

Study finds sighted babies of blind mothers find other ways to bond

first_img Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B People staring into one another’s eyes is a well known form of communication, and has no doubt been observed between babies and mothers throughout human history. It’s a demonstrated means of bonding—babies that go without, such as those in an orphanage have been found to lack communication and social skills. But what happens when the mother is blind? Without eye-locking, do such babies develop any differently than babies with sighted mothers? That’s what the team members on this new effort sought to discover.To find out, they enlisted the assistance of five babies and their blind mothers. Each of the babies was tested for their communication skills at ages 6-10, 12-15 and 24-47 months. Babies were observed with their mothers and while watching videos of other women communicating—their eye movements were also tracked using face scanning technology. In all of the tests, the five babies were found to have communication skills comparable to babies born to sighted women, and even in some instances, appeared to have gained some advantages, such as better visual memory retention and quicker response times to changing images. It’s all due, the researchers speculate, to both the way the blind mother’s interact with their babies in non-visual ways, and the innate plasticity of the human brain.Interestingly, the babies tested appeared to also have developed separate communication skills for different people—when communicating with their blind mothers, for example, they used more verbal sounds than they did when trying to communicate with other people, such as their sighted father. The researchers compare this kind of adaption to babies that grow up in bilingual homes. Such babies gain a cognitive boost and as a result oftentimes become better communicators. (Phys.org) —A unique study carried out by researchers from the U.K., Australia and Canada has revealed that babies born to blind mothers don’t appear to suffer degraded communication skills compared to babies born to sighted mothers. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the researchers found that not only did the babies of blind mothers perform as well as did babies born to sighted mother’s on standard communication tests, but appeared to develop some advantages as well. © 2013 Phys.org Citation: Study finds sighted babies of blind mothers find other ways to bond (2013, April 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-04-sighted-babies-mothers-ways-bond.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img More information: The importance of the eyes: communication skills in infants of blind parents, Published 10 April 2013 doi: 10.1098/rspb.2013.0436AbstractThe effects of selectively different experience of eye contact and gaze behaviour on the early development of five sighted infants of blind parents were investigated. Infants were assessed longitudinally at 6–10, 12–15 and 24–47 months. Face scanning and gaze following were assessed using eye tracking. In addition, established measures of autistic-like behaviours and standardized tests of cognitive, motor and linguistic development, as well as observations of naturalistic parent–child interaction were collected. These data were compared with those obtained from a larger group of sighted infants of sighted parents. Infants with blind parents did not show an overall decrease in eye contact or gaze following when they observed sighted adults on video or in live interactions, nor did they show any autistic-like behaviours. However, they directed their own eye gaze somewhat less frequently towards their blind mothers and also showed improved performance in visual memory and attention at younger ages. Being reared with significantly reduced experience of eye contact and gaze behaviour does not preclude sighted infants from developing typical gaze processing and other social-communication skills. Indeed, the need to switch between different types of communication strategy may actually enhance other skills during development.Press release © The Babylab, Birkbeck, University of London Explore further It’s true – babies do direct their motherslast_img read more