Batshuayi scores twice for Chelsea’s development side in Checkatrade Trophy win

first_imgEmbed from Getty ImagesMichy Batshuayi scored twice as Chelsea’s development side won 4-0 at MK Dons to reach the last 16 of the Checkatrade Trophy.Batshuayi, Charly Musonda and Kenedy all featured, taking the chance to improve their match fitness following their respective injuries.Musonda also found the net, as did striker Callum Hudson-Odoi.Batshuayi opened the scoring with a cool finish after being put through by Kyle Scott and then doubled the visitors’ lead by tapping in Kenedy’s cross.Chelsea were three up by half-time courtesy of keeper Wieger Sietsma allowing Hudson-Odoi’s long-range shot to slip through his legs.Musonda added the fourth after combining with Batshuayi just before the hour mark.Goalkeeper Eduardo played too, while Kylian Hazard – the 22-year-old brother of Blues star Eden – came on as a second-half substitute.Under tournament rules, Premier League clubs can field up to five players over the age of 21.Chelsea: Eduardo, James, Ampadu, Clarke-Salter, Chalobah (K Hazard 70), Sterling, Scott, Kenedy, Musonda, Batshuayi, Hudson-Odoi (Sammut 70).See also:Stats suggest Hazard is in the best form of his careerIllness rules Drinkwater out of West Ham gameConte refuses to discuss Luiz’s futureConte surprised West Ham have struggledMusonda signs new long-term Chelsea contract Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Joyner’s complete game leads Crusaders past Wildcats

first_imgBode Joyner pitcher a complete game 2-hitter and the St. Bernard’s baseball team fended off Little 4 Conference foe Ferndale 4-1. Wednesday afternoon at St. Bernard’s High.Joyner tossed six strikeouts and three walks in the win, helping to keep St. Bernard’s (3-1, 9-3) atop the Little 4 standings where it remains tied with South Fork (3-1, 7-2).Wednesday’s game played closely — which was to be expected as St. Bernard’s fought Ferndale to a 1-0 win earlier in the season — and remained a …last_img read more

We Don’t Know How We Know that Genes Make Minds

first_img“If the mind can be explained from the workings of the brain, and the brain develops by direction from our genes,” Anthony Monaco (Oxford) writes, “then presumably the mind can be explained from our genetic make-up.  But how can only 30,000 genes make a brain with billions of neurons and encode the particular aspects of cognition that make us human?”    This question opens his book review of The Birth of the Mind: How a Tiny Number of Genes Creates the Complexities of Human Thought by Gary Marcus (Basic Books, 2004) in the Feb. 19 issue of Nature.1  Monaco describes the book’s proposed answers to two paradoxes: (1) how a small number of genes codes for millions of neurons, and (2) how the brain can code for flexibility: “How does the brain of a newborn, with its complex structures and connections, have the plasticity to enable it to respond to environmental influences as it develops further?”    He seems to agree with the view of author Gary Marcus, a cognitive psychologist, that “the brain is built by genes in a self-organized way before being reorganized and shaped by experience and the environment.  It is not a battle where one side wins, but a vital interaction.”  But how do we get from genes to mind, to cognition, thought and reason?Having clarified these two paradoxes using our current knowledge of genetics and neuroscience, can we explain how genes make minds?  The story is only beginning.  This book shows that genes build brains and that brains are designed to be flexible and to learn, but the jump from genes to the mind is an indirect one.  The question cannot yet be answered, and it is not entirely clear where the answer will come from.Cognitive psychologists and neurologists have some clues, aided by real-time imaging techniques, but Monaco warns that “The path ahead to integrate these disciplines to gain a fuller understanding is optimistically vague….”  He warns readers about the “sheer complexity of the science”.1Anthony P. Monaco, “A recipe for the mind,” Nature 427, 681 (19 February 2004); doi:10.1038/427681b.A naturalistic explanation for the mind, soul and spirit does not seem to be forthcoming, does it?  (By “explanation” we do not mean a just-so story; those are always in plentiful supply.)(Visited 10 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

ADI: ±0.5% accurate supervisors target very low voltage components

first_imgAnalog Devices announces the Power by Linear LTC2962-LTC2964 family of exceptionally accurate 4-channel voltage supervisors for increased system voltage margin and enhanced reliability.  ASIC, FPGA, DSP, MCU and MPU architectures that operate from supplies as low as 1V cannot utilize traditional 1%-2% accurate voltage supervisors without shedding valuable system voltage margin and shrinking the remaining load operating voltage range.  The LTC2962 family possesses a best-in-class ±0.5% reset threshold accuracy, which relaxes power supply demands, increases system tolerance to transients, and enabling a lower nominal supply to dramatically reduce power consumption.  The LTC2962 family fulfills many network, telecom and automotive requirements with its high accuracy, flexible 1V to 5V (or adjustable) reset thresholds, and wide operating temperature range.A unique feature set differentiates the LTC2962 family in the low power voltage monitor market, making it an excellent choice for many multi-rail applications.  For each channel, one of 16 preset or adjustable, ±0.5% accurate, voltage thresholds can be easily selected for undervoltage, overvoltage or negative monitoring.  The supervisory circuits monitor inputs and drive the outputs according to the configured thresholds.  Alternatively, a manual reset input is also available for optional use of a pushbutton switch to force a system reset.  Ordering options include a watchdog with adjustable timers (LTC2963-1) and individual comparator open-drain outputs for each channel (LTC2964).  An adjustable timeout period is available on all devices. The LTC2962 family is available today in multiple temperature grades: 0 to 70°C (C grade), –40 to 85°C (I grade), and –40 to 125°C (H grade).  The LTC2962 is available in a 16-lead 3 x 3mm QFN, while the LTC2963-1 and LTC2964 are available in a 20-lead 3x 4mm QFN.Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInMoreRedditTumblrPinterestWhatsAppSkypePocketTelegram Tags: Chips & Components Continue Reading Previous BrainChip: neural network acceleration SoCs puts artificial intelligence at the edge and enterpriseNext Renesas to acquire Integrated Device Technologylast_img read more

500 Volunteers Trained to Search for and Rescue Missing Children

first_img Minister of State in the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information, Hon. Floyd Green, is reporting that 500 volunteers were trained last year to assist in search and rescue operations when a child is reported missing. Between 2009 and 2016, a total of 15,524 children were reported missing. This represents an average of 1,941 children going missing each year, with 78 per cent being girls and 22 per cent, boys. Mr. Green, who was addressing the Ananda Alert National Missing Children’s Forum at the Jamaica Conference Centre, downtown Kingston, on Thursday (May 25), said the Government is committed to protecting the nation’s youth, and urged all well-thinking Jamaicans to do their part. Story Highlights Minister of State in the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information, Hon. Floyd Green, is reporting that 500 volunteers were trained last year to assist in search and rescue operations when a child is reported missing.The volunteers, from communities across the island, also received instruction in first aid techniques.“Not only do we want to know that when a child has gone missing that the reports go out to all our media houses, we want to know that we have volunteers across the length and breadth of Jamaica, who will go out and start the process of searching to bring back our children,” Mr. Green said.The Office of the Children’s Registry (OCR) published the first Search and Rescue Protocol in 2014, and conducted 10 training sessions through the Caribbean Search Centre of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) for over 150 volunteers in St. James, Trelawny, St. Ann, St. Thomas, Westmoreland and St. Catherine.Mr. Green, who was addressing the Ananda Alert National Missing Children’s Forum at the Jamaica Conference Centre, downtown Kingston, on Thursday (May 25), said the Government is committed to protecting the nation’s youth, and urged all well-thinking Jamaicans to do their part.He noted that significant reforms have been undertaken in terms of how the State responds to missing children.This includes updating the reporting timeline to allow for a missing-person report to be made before 24 hours have passed.“Once you reasonably suspect that a child has gone missing, you can make that report to the police, to the OCR and we will start working on it immediately,” the State Minister pointed out.In addition, a partnership has been forged with Facebook to broadcast Ananda Alerts to users of the social media site in Jamaica.This is expected to broaden the search for missing children. These alerts will include photographs and other pertinent information about the child.In the meantime, the Minister urged parents to do more to ensure that their children feel safe and protected.“A lot of children leave home because of what they term as maltreatment and neglect,” he pointed out.He said the Ananda Alert Secretariat has undertaken an internal study to determine the profile of children who go missing and the main reasons they give. He said it is the intention of the Secretariat to undertake a broader survey.Between 2009 and 2016, a total of 15,524 children were reported missing. This represents an average of 1,941 children going missing each year, with 78 per cent being girls and 22 per cent, boys.Last year, the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) reported some 1,725 children missing, a decline of 11 per cent over the previous year.The State Minister pointed out that 90 per cent of missing children return home. “I do not take comfort in the fact that we have a 90 per cent return rate because it does mean that there are 10 per cent that remain unaccounted for,” he said.last_img read more