Hidco to organise kiteflying competition for senior citizens

first_imgKolkata: Housing Infrastructure Development Corporation (Hidco) is set to organise a unique kite-flying competition on Wednesday, in which senior citizens members of Swapno Bhor and Snehodiya at New Town, will take part.Hidco will give kites, latais and suta to the participants. The competition will start at 3pm and the winning candidate will be given a token prize. The function has created great enthusiasm among the residents of Snehodiya and the members of Swapno Bhor, all of whom are senior citizens. Senior citizens through kite-flying are trying to go back to their young days when kite flying on the Viswakarma Puja day was almost considered to be a must in Kolkata and the districts. Kite-flying in Howrah and Hooghly districts were held on the day of Poush Sankranti. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaIn Kolkata, till the late 1980s, people from different ages took part in kite-flying. In Kalighat, opposite to the house of Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee there was a famous kite-selling shop called Debalaya. Two kite-selling shops in Central Kolkata, the more famous one being Ghuri Ghor on Creek Row, still sells kites but the number of buyers has gone down drastically. The famous kites were named as Mukh Pora, Chandial and Pet Katti etc. Kite-flying was hit badly after old buildings in the city were demolished to make room for high-rise apartments. The owners do not have any access to the roof and from the mid 1990s the number of kites that were seen on the sky fell drastically. It was Wajid Ali Shah, the deposed Nawab of Lucknow who came to Kolkata and settled in Metiabruz introduced kite-flying in Kolkata. He used to fly colourful kites and the papers were imported from Germany. Well-known singers Manna Dey and Mohammad Rafi were also avid lovers of kite-flying.last_img read more

Federal Court of Appeal decision on Trans Mountain coming next week

first_imgVANCOUVER – The Federal Court of Appeal is scheduled to release its decision next week in a case that combined nearly two dozen lawsuits calling for the National Energy Board’s review of the Trans Mountain pipeline to be overturned.The board, Trans Mountain and the federal government defended the project as viable during two weeks of hearings in Vancouver last fall.First Nations, including the Tsleil-Waututh, argued the federal government did not adequately consult them, although federal lawyers told the hearings extensive consultations were conducted.Environmental groups and the cities of Vancouver and Burnaby also challenged the project and were supported by the province of British Columbia, which was an intervener in the case.Alberta was also an intervener and a lawyer for the province said Ottawa’s decision to approve the expansion of the pipeline between Edmonton and Metro Vancouver was based on a broad base of evidence that considered environmental, economic and Indigenous interests.The federal government announced in May that it was buying the Trans Mountain pipeline for $4.5 billion to ensure what it calls a vital piece of infrastructure is built.The Federal Court of Appeal tweeted Friday that the decision would be released next Thursday on its website.last_img read more

WRITER DIRECTOR STAR – CATHERINE REITMAN IS A REAL LIFE WORKIN MOM

first_imgAdvertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Workin’ Moms sold to FX first, before they passed and the CBC snapped it up. How is producing TV in Canada different than in the States? Are there things you can do here that you can’t do there?Absolutely. Coming to Canada has been incredibly liberating, both creatively and production-wise for [my husband and co-producer/co-star] Philip and I. For one, we’re partners in the creation of our show, as opposed to the usual contact you’d get in the United States, where you’re an employee on a show of your own creation. So, being able to feel ownership not only is exhilarating because it’s yours, but also you feel so much more responsibility, you know? If the show fails or succeeds, it’s on you. Catherine Reitman is living that working mom life—hard. She is the showrunner on CBC’s comedy hit Workin’ Moms (which she produces with her husband Philip Sternberg); she also writes and directs for the show. Oh, and stars on it. In addition to her show baby, she has two little ones at home. (She also pops up on Black-ish from time to time.) Reitman has won fans among the mom brigade and beyond for her raw, honest portrayal of the trials and tribulations of motherhood, from postpartum depression to breastfeeding boobs. With season three premiering today, we spoke with Reitman about directing cranky old men, tackling #MeToo on-screen, and working with her hubs.What are some issues and experiences that you felt were missing from the modern TV landscape that you wanted to show on Workin’ Moms?I felt that there was a limited portrayal of how mothers appeared on television. When I first got pregnant, my husband and I were huge consumers of premium cable television, and we were watching all of these shows, and it would either be the B-storyline of a show like Homeland, where she’s a working mother, or you have even smaller C-storylines on a show like Mad Men. And when mother storylines were A-storylines, they felt either very broad or kind of melodramatic—I wanted to see the comedy that I was used to watching with my husband, but my story. And I couldn’t find that anywhere. Advertisement Twitter Facebook Advertisementlast_img read more