Bright future for FNB Stadium

first_imgFNB Stadium will host more Soweto derbies. FNB’s grass being trimmed for a big game. Jacques Grobbelaar is a director of FNB’smanagement company. The calabash-designed venue was ahub of activity during the World Cup.(Images: Bongani Nkosi)MEDIA CONTACTS• Orelia GrobbelaarCorporate AffairsStadium Management South Africa+27 11 247 5300Bongani NkosiThe FNB Stadium in Johannesburg, a hub of activity during the 2010 Fifa World Cup, is the most profitable facility that was built or renovated in South African for tournament matches – and its success as a venue looks set to continue.The stadium, also referred to as Soccer City, is now back to hosting big sport games like the Soweto Derby between Kaizer Chiefs and Orlando Pirates, other premier league football matches, as well as international football and rugby matches.World-famous entertainers are also billed to perform at the 94 000-capacity venue in the coming months, said Jacques Grobbelaar, director of Stadium Management South Africa which manages the FNB facility, Soweto’s Orlando and Dobsonville stadiums and Rand Stadium in southern Johannesburg.“Big stars are coming to the stadium,” said Grobbelaar at a media briefing at the stadium on 22 September.It’s been confirmed that US pop sensation Neil Diamond will perform there later this year.Although there are concerns that the 10 World Cup stadiums won’t be used to their full potential, this is not the case with the multi-purpose FNB facility, said the management group which has been given full responsibility to run the venue owned by the City of Johannesburg.Tickets snapped up for FNB matchesThe government renovated the FNB Stadium at a cost of R3.3-billion (US$460.6-million) ahead of the global football spectacle.Since hosting the momentous World Cup matches, including the opening and final, FNB went on to stage four high-attendance football and rugby matches, two of which were sold-out events.The sold-out Telkom Charity Cup, which provided all-day football activities in August, was held there, followed later in the month by a historic Tri-Nations match between South Africa’s national rugby side the Springboks and the All Blacks of New Zealand. Some 92 000 tickets were snapped up for this face-off.Bafana Bafana beat Ghana at the stadium in a well-attended match on 10 August.It was also a playground for the first round of the MTN Top 8 semifinal between Soweto giants Chiefs and Pirates, which attracted more than 50 000 spectators. The second round will also be at the stadium on 25 September.“Pirates and Chiefs will play their big matches here,” Grobbelaar said.Stadium Management South Africa has secured further agreements with Chiefs and Pirates, the biggest premier league clubs in Johannesburg, to use Rand Stadium and Orlando Stadium for their home matches.Chiefs played its home matches outside Johannesburg during the previous season, although it’s traditionally a Soweto-based team. Another Soweto premier league outfit, Moroka Swallows, plays its home matches at Dobsonville Stadium.It’s taken more than luck to strike these agreements with such big teams, Grobbelaar said. It took the company 14 months to get Chiefs to agree to play at Rand Stadium, and negotiations with Pirates dragged on for nine months.It took 18 months to bring the Tri-Nations match to FNB, according to Grobbelaar. “We were quite chuffed with finalising those agreements,” he said.“It’s not the fact that we’re lucky, all stadiums are competing [for these games].”Negotiations are under way with the Golden Lions rugby team to be moved to FNB.Stadium financially sustainableThe stadium requires about R2.5-million ($35 000) for maintenance each month – but this is no problem for management because “we’ve put proper content by attracting Chiefs and Pirates”, said Grobbelaar.Management is “doing well” in “meeting the financial demands”.“We don’t have any concerns about sustainability. We know that the stadium will be utilised,” said Grobbelaar.The FNB Stadium receives no funding from the City of Johannesburg for maintenance. “We accepted full financial responsibility of the stadium.”Grobbelaar said 40% of the management group’s profit is ploughed into community development projects around Johannesburg.last_img read more

Livestock legalities around the nation affecting producers

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Evin Bachelor, Law Fellow, Agricultural and Resource Law Program, Ohio State UniversityEvery year, we hear fascinating legal updates at the American Agricultural Law Association’s annual conference. Thanks to presentations by Todd Janzen and Brianna Schroeder of Janzen Ag Law in Indianapolis, we were inspired to learn a little more about trends in meat law. For readers with a livestock operation, these legal issues can present great challenges, and keeping up to date on legal trends helps farmers stay prepared. Veal, pork, and eggs: States battle each other on minimum confinement space regulationsCalifornia voters passed Proposition 12 in the November 2018 election, which will require producers to comply with minimum confinement space regulations in order to sell certain products in California. The Prevent Cruelty California Coalition placed the proposition on the ballot, expanding a previous regulation on in-state suppliers, but the new law would apply to any producer trying to sell veal, pork, or eggs in California. By 2020, veal calves must be housed with at least 43 square feet of usable floor space, breeding pigs must be housed with at least 24 square feet of usable floor space, and egg-laying hens must have at least 1 square foot of floor space. However, by 2022, egg-laying hens must be cage free. Proposition 12 strengthens requirements approved by California voters in 2008’s Proposition 2 by imposing the requirements on out-of-state producers who want to sell their products in California.In 2016, Massachusetts voters approved a ballot measure that would require eggs sold within the state to be cage free by 2022. Thirteen states, led by Indiana, have sued Massachusetts in the United States Supreme Court in an attempt to stop Massachusetts from enforcing the requirement. These states allege that the restriction is an attempt to regulate how farmers in other states operate, which violates the rights of other states to create their own regulations. This would be a constitutional question under what is known as the Dormant Commerce Clause, which prohibits states from unfairly regulating business activities that have impacts beyond a state’s border. Status updates on the lawsuit are available here.Trying a legislative solution to slow the trend of cage-free restrictions, Iowa passed a law earlier this year that requires grocers that sell cage-free eggs to also sell conventional eggs if they want to receive benefits from the USDA WIC program. Supporters of the law argued that cage-free eggs are often more expensive and excluded from the WIC program. They argue that as a result, when grocers make commitments to sell only cage-free eggs, they make it more difficult for low-income families to purchase eggs. Non-meat proteins continue to target beefThe “Impossible Burger” wants to convince consumers that a non-meat burger patty that tastes just like meat is just around the corner. Veggie burgers are not new to the grocery store shelves, but recent innovations that have allowed non-meat proteins to improve in taste and texture have raised concerns among meat producers that these products are becoming a serious threat. Given that many of these innovations have taken aim at the burger market, beef producers in particular have felt a target on their backs. As we reported in a previous edition of The Harvest, Missouri became the first state this year to regulate labeling of non-animal products as being derived from an animal, and the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association has petitioned the USDA to consider regulating labels involving animal terms like “meat.” Other speakers at the AALA conference indicated that the USDA is currently debating how to regulate labels, but has yet to develop a comprehensive rule package. Dairy contracts: always know what you are signingThe market has been very tough for dairy producers. Having a long term supply contract in place is certainly preferable to no contract, but depending upon the terms of the contract, unfortunate surprises may be in store.Purchasers often write the contracts, and include terms that favor them. For example, many contracts contain termination provisions that allow either party to end the agreement for essentially any reason with prior notice, often 30 days. When producers invest in their operations under the expectation that the contract will stand throughout the term specified, these termination provisions can result in devastating surprises. As another example, many contracts contain confidentiality agreements that make it difficult for a producer to determine whether the deal they are offered is great, average, or actually bad. Equally concerning for producers are provisions that shift liability for problems with the milk to the producer, and away from the purchaser who sells the milk on the market. With modern technology, tracking where milk originated makes this possible. Courts are likely to enforce these agreements because the law of contracts favors enforcement of private agreements.Given the current market, many dairy producers felt that they are not in a position to negotiate better terms, for fear that another dairy close by will accept the terms as-is. This position is made worse by the inability of producers to talk about their contracts with one another because of confidentiality provisions.What a producer can do is to read the contract carefully and make sure that he or she understands the terms of the contract. It may be wise to speak with an attorney to verify that the producer’s understanding of the contract matches how the contract is likely to be read by a court.Even writes for the Ohio Agricultural Law Blog.last_img read more

The Better You Get the Better You Better Get

first_imgThe title of the post was inspired by David Allen, founder of GTD (Get Things Done); if you listen to him enough you’ll hear him say it.If you want better results than you are generating now, you have to become better than you are now.Putting Things in the Right OrderThere are a lot of areas you might improve upon, and in Sales business acumen is right at the top of that list. But not the very, very top.Your physical health is the most important factor when it comes to generating greater success. Without your physical health, you will lack the stamina and energy to perform at peak levels. You are going to generate your very best performance when you are in your best physical health.The answer to optimal health is simple, but it isn’t easy. It requires that you sleep more than you believe necessary. It also means you need to eat with health as the intention instead of pleasure (even though there are ways to accomplish both). You also have to maintain your hydration.This is all common sense, but too few practice it, especially people who are running and gunning, hustling and achieving.Mental ToughnessThe second most important factor in your success depends a great deal on the first factor, and that is your psychological health. Your mental stamina and mental toughness depend a great deal upon your physical health. But they also depend upon your underlying belief systems and your attitude.You may not believe that you have a philosophy of your own, but you do, and it is found in your belief structures. The question is whether it is serving you.Your personal philosophy, your mind’s operating system, is worth exploring, and it’s worth working on. For an immediate improvement, look at the new mindfulness work and the stoic philosophies (Of which Tim Ferris and Ryan Holliday are huge proponents, both who make that work easily accessible).If you really want to be a hustler, and by that I mean a truly successful salesperson, you need to be committed to yourself first and foremost. Before you dive into a new health regimen it’s important that you’re mindful as to why you are doing it. Your physical health is the foundation upon which your sales success is built.last_img read more

Insecticide poisoning: 7 more die in three days in Yavatmal

first_imgSeven more farmers have died in the past three days owing to improper spraying of ‘Profex Super’ insecticide on cotton plantations in Yavatmal district, taking the toll to 15.Kishor Tiwari, chief of Vasantrao Naik Shetkari Swavalamban Mission, said over 600 cases of insecticide infection have been reported in Yavatmal district. He blamed indiscriminate use of wrong combinations of insecticides, and direct and continuous exposure to toxic substances owing to lack of protective gear for the death of farmers and farm workers over the past one week.The deceased farmers have been identified as Dashrath Chavan of Naygaon village, Devidas Madavi of Kalamb town, Kailash Pendor of Jamni village, Ayub Sheikh of Kalgaon village, Anil Chavan of Kalamb, Ramesh Chirawar of Ghatanji village, Ravi Rathod of Uchegaon village, Vithal Parkewar and Pradip Soyami from Kelapur town, Vasant Sidam of Maregoan village, Maroti Pimpalkar of Kalegoan village, Divakar Ghoshi of Ghoddara village, Shankar Kedam of Talki village, Dipak Madavi of Arni town. and Bandu Sonurle of Manoli village.Mr. Tiwari also blamed genetically modified Bt cotton seeds for the deaths. He said, “Bt cotton seeds are supposed to be resistant to bollworm and other infestations. However, they failed to tackle the pests and this resulted in the use of the toxic and internationally banned Monocrotophos, a highly toxic pesticide, which makes plants look green and healthy but causes the resurgence of pink bollworm. The chances of exposure to toxic chemicals increase as farmers use non-recommended combinations.”Mr. Tiwari said Maharashtra had the largest area under cotton cultivation (over 40 lakh hectares) and tribal farm workers would continue to die if the State did not ban chemical farming in regions seeing a spate of suicides over crop failure.last_img read more