Frampton retains title

first_imgThe Belfast boxer was knocked down twice by his opponent, Alejandro Gonzalez Junior, in the opening round.But he recovered well to control the remainder of the bout.Scott Quigg could be Frampton’s next fight – he overcame Kiko Martinez last night to retain his WBA ‘regular’ super-bantamweight belt.last_img

Selector originating from BiH took Croatia to Semi-finals of the World Cup in Russia!

first_imgNational football team of Croatia is the last semi-finalist of the World Cup in Russia.Last night, Croats won against the host, the team of Russia, with the score 4: 3 after better penalty shootout. The result after 90 minutes of the match was 1: 1, and after 120 minutes it was 2: 2.Russia took the lead in the 31st minute with the goal of Denis Cheryshev, who scored with a powerful and precise shot after he got the ball from Artem Dzyuba.However, their joy  did not last for too long. Andrej Kramaric, assisted by Mario Mandzukic, scored a goal in the 39th minute of the match and tied the score.Both teams had numerous opportunity to score in the second half of the match, and Ivan Perisic was the closest to scoring a goal in 59th minute of the match.The result was the same after 90 minutes of the match, and they played the extra time during which were scored two goals. Domagoj Vida brought the lead back to Croatia with the goal he scored from 11 meters distance after Luka Modric’s corner, and Mario Fernandes scored in 115th minute for Russia.Alan Dzagoev performed a free kick, and Fernandes handled the situation and sent the ball between the goal stands.Croats were more successful in the performance of penalties, and Ivan Rakitic scored the decisive goal.In the semi-finals that will take place on July 11, in Moscow, Croatia will play against the team of England, which won against the team of Sweden with the score 2: 0. Belgium and France will fight for the finals a day earlier in Saint Petersburg.(Source: fena)last_img read more

Mason Rudolph won’t pursue legal case against Myles Garrett for helmet swing, report says

first_imgFormer Steelers linebacker James Harrison was one of many people in the Twitterverse to accuse Garrett of assault late Thursday, after Garrett’s helmet swing landed on top of Rudolph’s head. Rudolph, who suffered a concussion in Week 5, did not appear to be injured by Garrett.The NFL on Friday suspended Garrett indefinitely and fined him an undisclosed amount. The league also reportedly fined Rudolph, although it has not announced that punishment. Steelers center Maurkice Pouncey (three games) and Browns lineman Larry Ogunjobi (one game) were also suspended for their roles in the brawl that Garrett and Rudolph sparked. The Browns and Steelers were each fined $250,000.The Twitterverse was upset that Rudolph wasn’t also suspended. It appears Steelers quarterback Mason Rudolph will not take Browns defensive end Myles Garrett to court after Garrett took Rudolph’s helmet off his head and hit Rudolph with it in the closing seconds of their game Thursday night.Ian Rapoport of NFL Network tweeted Friday night that Rudolph considers the incident “to be exclusively an NFL matter” and thus will not take legal action against Garrett. MORE COVERAGE:AFC North culture must change | Timeline of recent incidentsPouncey lost the high ground | Garrett damaged futurelast_img read more

Uganda ends Eritrea run to win 15th CECAFA Cup title

first_imgUganda are CECAFA champs. PHOTO FUFA MEDIANairobi, Kenya | AFP & URN |  Uganda beat Eritrea 3-0 to win the Cecafa Cup for the 15th time on Thursday and become East Africa’s most successful side in the regional competition.Goals from Bright Anukani, Mustafa Kizza and Joel Madondo saw Johnathan McKinstry’s side triumph against the resurgent Eritrea who eliminated the defending champions Kenya in emphatic fashion on Tuesday.But it was Eritrea who took the early initiative, and almost got an opener in the seventh minute when dangerman Robel Kidane was denied an open chance by the resilient Ugandan backline.Uganda fought back and appeared to have taken the lead in the 11th minute when Allan Okello found the back of net but the referee ruled out his effort for offside.The new champions, however, did not make a mistake when Anukani beautifully curled home the opener past Eritrean goalkeeper Solomun Haile Kibrom after 31 minute.Two second half goals from Kizza and substitute Madondo wore down the spirited Eritrea side, who were featuring in their first ever final in the regional championships.Kenya won the bronze medal after edging out arch-rivals Tanzania 2-1. McKinstry’s first title“I am happy that the boys have worked hard and won the trophy. It is a good tournament we have used to prepare for the 2020 Africa Nations Championship because we have won all the five games,” said Uganda Cranes coach Jonathan McKinstry after the game.“We have worked as a team and deserve to win this trophy,” said Uganda Cranes skipper Halid Lwaliwa. Eritrea’s coach Efrem Haile Alemseghed said they lost to a good side.Kenya finished third to win bronze after beating Tanzania 2-1 in an earlier match. Kenneth Muguna and Hassan Abdallah scored for the Harambee Stars of Kenya, while Gadiel Michael Kamagi converted a second half penalty for Tanzania.Uganda Cranes also received the Fair Play Award, while Uganda’s Charles Lukwago was voted best goalkeeper. Kenya’s Oscar Wamalwa was best scorer with three goals, while Eritrea’s skipper Robel Micheal Tekle was voted Best player of the tournament.Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

Making summer camp possible

first_img Oscar White offers the young chicken some grass and leaves as a snack. — Kyra Steck Camp Kindness instructors lead campers in an outdoor yoga activity. — Kyra Steck From left, 6-year-old Oscar White, Elin Angelina, 9, and Dylan White, 8, at the FARM Institute. — Kyra Steck We’ve all followed arrows through the aisles of Stop & Shop, or fiddled with the mask that just won’t sit comfortably on our nose. These precautions are slowly becoming second nature to us, but for Island summer camps, COVID-19 practices and guidelines are new territory.This is what I learned from the YMCA’s summer camp and afterschool director, Tara Dinke,l and Kelly Neadow, senior program director of youth and staff development. This year’s camp is unlike any that came before it — so much so that’s taken on a new name.“Usually our camp is called Camp Terra Mare, but we changed it to Camp Kindness this year, because more than anything we need kindness right now,” Dinkel said. Neadow explained that Camp Kindness staff try to keep camper masks on, and give outdoor “mask breaks” if a camper becomes uncomfortable. “We explain social distancing and masks the best that we can, and we strongly encourage children to participate in that. We don’t discipline here at all, but for lack of a better term, we’d never be upset with a child for not wanting to wear one,” Neadow said.Campers check in each morning with the same counselor. They report to their family’s designated outdoor area, where they leave their belongings in individual baskets that are cleaned nightly. “All the Y staff have come together to build what we have here. Our housekeeping department is obviously a huge player,” Neadow said. “They’re here as many hours as our camp staff is here, because they’re right behind everyone, cleaning, cleaning, cleaning.”As the camp days unfold, each family participates in a separate activity. Many are outdoor, but while inside the YMCA building, each family uses their own classroom space. While one group has arts and crafts time (using only their individual materials), another enjoys an outdoor fitness class with YMCA health and wellness director Asil Cash. The Martha’s Vineyard Film Festival has provided some of their resources, allowing campers to watch movies or participate in film-based activities. Campers even have scheduled blocks of ice-skating time at the M.V. Ice Arena, and swimming at the YMCA pool.Only a handful of events take place at the same time for all campers, including lunchtime and “Camper Connection,” which acts as a check-in for campers. Even these events take place within the individual families, rather than as a group.“For a lot of us, the camp magic comes from those big gatherings, but that’s not for everybody. For some of these kids, this could work out better than a typical camp model,” Neadow said.Dinkel noted optimistically that having fewer campers has allowed for a more personal experience. “We’re able to engage with them. We actually get to sit down and have conversations with them,” Dinkel said. “We know all 50 kids by heart.”As parents themselves, Dinkel and Neadow have been thrilled to receive a great deal of support from both campers and their guardians. “We’ve been getting a lot of positive feedback,” Neadow said, recalling one young camper’s mother claiming her son’s first day at Camp Kindness was “the best day of his life.”“This is the first time the kids have been out of quarantine, so they’re just loving being around other kids and not being stuck at home,” Dinkel said.According to Dinkel and Neadow, setting up a YMCA camp for this summer proved challenging at first. “Early June, you know, everything was still a little scary when we had to be making these decisions,” Neadow said. “The biggest question was, ‘Can we do it and keep our staff safe?’ We knew kids would need it and families would need it, and little by little it grew until we could say yes.”“Now it’s turned into this beautiful thing,” Dinkel said.Neadow agreed. “It wouldn’t feel right if we weren’t doing this. We’re just really happy it all worked out the way it did,” Neadow said. Brandon Barua and Finley Slavine make containers to drop from the upper level of the barn with an egg inside, with hopes their egg doesn’t crack. — Kyra Steck Each camper at Camp Kindness gets their own camper supplies box. — Kyra Steck YMCA Camp Kindness is following all social distancing and health guidelines to make sure campers can have a fun and safe summer. — Kyra Steck Camp drop-off was just finishing up when I arrived at the YMCA Monday morning. A single car rolled up along the building’s right side, and a young, masked camper clambered out. Two staff members greeted him from beneath a tent, sheltering themselves from the 10 am sun. The duo wore matching tie-dyed tank tops, and in front of them, a foldable table displayed items of importance: a basket of surgical and fabric masks, a squirt bottle of hand sanitizer, and a sign that read, “Welcome to Camp Kindness Week Three.” Camp Kindness started its third week of programming August 3, with a pirate theme and a bounty of pandemic protocols. Only 50 campers are permitted at this year’s camp, as opposed to the usual 100-plus. For YMCA members, a week at Camp Kindness costs $270, with a $15 registration fee. The weekly price rises to $325 for nonmembers. Across the board, additional siblings can tag along for $15 each.Each camper is screened upon arrival with a series of questions, including whether they’ve experienced symptoms of COVID-19 or spent time with someone who has tested positive. Before starting the day, campers wash or sanitize their hands at one of the many sinks or hand-sanitizing stations. Campers are only permitted to interact with their group, or “family,” at this year’s camp. These are five families total, grouped based on camper age.As we spoke under the check-in tent, Camp Kindness’ eldest family of campers walked through the YMCA campus. Most campers wore masks, though two or three had pulled them down around their neck or chin. Some campers walked side by side, while others stayed at a distance.center_img Campers from a previous week built a wooden structure for the goats to play on. — Kyra Steck Tara Dinkel with arts and crafts supplies and some of the work done by campers. — Kyra Steck Campers finishing up after an outdoor fitness activity. — Kyra Steck Finley Slavine and Brandon Barua give some pats and scratches to their respective goat pals. — Kyra Steck New way of FARM lifeThe FARM Institute in Katama is another Island camp up and running this year. If you’ve ever been, you know this local spot is characterized by wide-open spaces and fresh air. This makes the farm a somewhat unique camp location, and in the age of COVID-19, perhaps an ideal one.The FARM Institute has been holding two new programs this season in place of their summer camp. “Mornings on the Farm at TFI” is a COVID-compliant alternative to the traditional camp experience, running Monday through Friday, 9 am to noon. Additionally, “Farmer for a Day” allows families to visit the institute and enjoy the farm experience, Monday through Friday, 1 pm to 3 pm.I arrived at The FARM Institute on a foggy Tuesday morning, and was struck by how empty the farm seemed. The main building was posted with signs, some reading, “Sorry, we’re closed,” and others displaying cartoon pigs in masks. On the porch, a staff member accompanied a group of three children as they pulled what one called, “very cold pizza” from their lunchboxes.The FARM Institute education manager, Lily Robbins, gave me a tour of the farm, explaining that the small number of people at TFI is simply part of new protocol. “All the kids are only part of their own pod, or their own quarantine group,” Robbins said. “We figured that’s the safest way to have kids here with our staff. We don’t have to worry about them interacting with each other if they’re going home and eating dinner together,” Robbins said.Each pod is made up of at least two participants, ages 6 and up. Pods sign up together, meaning participants come from the same household or shared space. When on the farm, they interact only with staff, and the other members of their pod.For FARM Institute members, the base price for two participants is $600, plus $300 for each additional child. For nonmembers, these prices increase to a base of $800 for two participants, and an additional $400 for each child after that.Robbins was quick to acknowledge that not every family may be able to easily pay these prices, and that the Institute tries to increase accessibility whenever possible. Their Island discount offers a 20 percent price drop to any Island family or child who attends an Island school. A scholarship program is also offered to anyone who wishes to apply. “They don’t have to prove taxes, they don’t have to turn any paperwork in, we just ask for a statement of need, and we will work with them,” Robbins said.Like the YMCA’s Camp Kindness, each participant is screened with a series of symptom-related questions. “Even before they sign up, the parents have to fill out a pretty rigorous online form with all their child’s medical information. We also have them do a 14-day prescreening form,” Robbins said.Mornings on the Farm participants get to experience a variety of creative, educational, and farm-centric activities. Each one is responsible for a daily morning chore; Robbins gave examples such as collecting eggs, feeding the chickens, or pulling weeds.Throughout the day, participants move throughout the FARM Institute space. While the main building remains closed, the barn is open on both ends, creating a spacious and well-ventilated indoor area. Each pod occupies its own room in the barn, where they can carry out activities and lessons in each other’s company. On this particular day, a pod of two siblings crafted cases for an egg drop. Between the pair’s concoctions of cardboard, construction paper, and tape, I’ll bet the egg stayed safe on its way down.Mornings on the Farm participants are permitted to interact with the farm animals, an opportunity that general public visitors do not have at this time. These animals are often incorporated into program activities. Robbins motioned to a boxlike wooden structure within the goat pen, built by a pod from the previous week. “They put all the pallets together, they learned how to use tools, they worked together and designed the whole thing,” Robbins said. With one open side, the goats can use the structure to avoid rain, find shade, or simply jump and play on.The FARM Institute enforces a rigid protocol for interacting with the farm animals. The goat pen is roped off and enclosed by a gate, which only staff are permitted to touch. If a pod wishes to enter the pen, each participant must sanitize their hands, then put on disposable gloves. Upon exiting the pen, participants must immediately remove their gloves and drop them into a trash bag beside the gate, then sanitize again. Participants must repeat this process if they are interacting with the goats for more than 15 minutes at a time.According to Robbins, the programs from previous years have been largely based around education. “We’ve called our counselors ‘educators,’ because they really are doing lessons with the kids,” Robbins said. While education remains an integral part of this year’s program, Mornings on the Farm brings an enhanced focus to each participant’s general well-being.“These kids have been going through so much. We just want them to be out in nature, interacting with people other than their parents, and feeling somewhat normal — being able to get their minds off of things,” Robbins said. Another camp, similar taleThere’s a similar story to be shared at the Martha’s Vineyard Boys & Girls Club. Their summer program, Camp MV, opened to Island youth on July 6. Since then, the camp has been operating carefully, and with the kids in mind.This year’s program is limited to only 66 campers, compared to their usual group of 120 to 130. Drop-off is staggered, starting around 7:45 am. Campers are separated into “pods” of eight, with two additional group leaders. Everyone, campers and staff alike, stays only with their pod throughout the day.Jessie Damroth, chief executive officer of the M.V. Boys & Girls Club, outlined Camp MV’s extensive sanitization schedule. Separate cleaning crews come in every 90 minutes to sanitize surfaces, and at the end of the day, the Boys & Girls Club building is deep-cleaned through electrostatic fogging. Thirteen new hand-sanitizing stations are spaced throughout the building, as well as an additional six outdoors.According to Damroth, Camp MV spends as much time in the outdoors as possible. “We obviously will have days where the heat or humidity are too high, and on those selected days we do fire up the HVAC system,” Damroth said. On these occasions, the Boys & Girls Club building is ventilated by fans and open windows.Masks are a requirement at Camp MV. According to Damroth, there has been little issue with enforcing this rule during camp hours. “They wear them inside and outside. We wanted the kids to get used to it, but also the staff. In this environment, it’s just a safer practice,” Damroth said.Mask breaks are permitted for campers, as long as they follow a set of guidelines. “Every pod has a different entrance and exit door in our facility, so there’s an area they can step out into and still be monitored if they need to take a break,” Damroth said.During outdoor activities, campers can remove their masks only after stepping six feet away from their group. Damroth explained that teaching campers to visualize six feet of distance has been key. “If we have a 12-year-old, we might say, ‘This is your favorite basketball player, this is how tall they are.’ Putting it into relatable terms has made all the difference in the world,” Damroth said.Due to these extensive protocols, Camp MV is unable to take the field trips that the Boys & Girls Club is known to take. In their place, the Camp MV team has found new ways to provide their campers with an Island experience. Educational components from the Martha’s Vineyard Museum, The Trustees of Reservations, and the Martha’s Vineyard Film Festival have all been incorporated into the Camp MV curriculum.Damroth admits that holding Camp MV has taken great effort. “COVID regulations are challenging, more than ever before. They’re exhausting,” Damroth said. Regardless, the Boys & Girls Club team knew from the start that Camp MV would be a necessity this year.“If you don’t have safe childcare, especially ‘COVID-safe,’ then you’re going to have issues with unsafe childcare. That’s why we knew we needed to move forward,” Damroth said. Kelly Neadow and Tara Dinkel finish up camper drop-off for the day. — Kyra Steck 1 of 11last_img read more

T20 World Cup to (hopefully) go ahead as planned: Cricket Australia

first_imgImage Courtesy: CA/ICCAdvertisement 1mhibdNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs6d1mdhWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Ej03( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 65fWould you ever consider trying this?😱9y6tkCan your students do this? 🌚9Roller skating! Powered by Firework Not even a month ago, Australia hosted the 2020 ICC WOmen’s T20 World Cup, where they successfully defended the title against the Indian Women’s cricket team in the final. Whilst gearing up for the Men’s T20 World Cup again later this year- the Aussies have come up with a big hurdle- the Coronavirus pandemic. The global outbreak of the COVID-19 virus has caused several major sports tournaments go get cancelled or postponed. However, Cricket Australia, the governing body of the sport in the country, is primarily hopeful on successfully conducting the T20 World Cup.Advertisement Image Courtesy: CA/ICCIt was only a couple of days ago when ICC themselves gave green signal on the Men’s T20WC. In a recent statement, ICC disclosed that there are no change of plans as of now, and the tournament will go ahead as planned.“The ICC Men’s T20 World Cup is scheduled to take place from October 18 – November 15 2020 in seven venues across Australia. We are planning for the event to go ahead as scheduled,” the statement read.Advertisement There has been 438 confirmed Coronavirus cases in Australia in total, and five of the patients have died. Amidst the worrying situation in the country, the ongoing ODI series between Australia and New Zealand was cancelled after the hosts won the first match at the Sydney Cricket Ground. Additionally, all further fixtures of cricket int the season was suspended.However, there has been no update on the upcoming cricket world cup, and on the heels of ICC’s confirmation, Cricket Australia themselves have shown confidence to conduct the tournament as planned, as CA’s chief Kevin Roberts said in an interview on Tuesday.Advertisement “We’re really hoping that all forms of sport can be played again in a few weeks’ or a few months’ time. None of us are experts in this situation obviously, so our hope is that we’re back in very much normal circumstances come October and November when the men’s T20 World Cup is to be played,” Roberts told reporters.“And at this stage we’re planning on November 15, to have a full house at the MCG (Melbourne Cricket Ground) to inspire the world through men’s cricket as the women’s cricketers did here just last week,” the CA chief added.The seventh edition of the Men’s T20 World CUup will start with Sri Lanka vs Ireland and papua New Guinea vs Oman at the Kardinia Park stadium in Victoria on October 18th 2020.Also read-Sachin compared fight against Coronavirus to Test cricket in plea to publicDespite Coronavirus, here are the sports leagues still going on! Advertisementlast_img read more