Premier Tourism Road Show with more cities more partners

first_img Road Show delegation starts in the Western USA Baha Mar deal should not be secret Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 24 Mar 2015 – New partners, new cities for a bigger impression when the public and private sector team up for a second Road Show and this time the talk will be far more than tourism. Premier Rufus Ewing with the Turks and Caicos Hotel & Tourism Association on Friday made the announcement that now the trip will include the Chamber of Commerce, the Real Estate Association and the Airports Authority. Premier Rufus Ewing: “We will meet with tourism professional as well as Mayors of some cities, Chambers of Commerce of some cities to discuss tourism in Turks and Caicos and to invite those individuals to either invest, visit or do business in the Turks and Caicos islands.”Michel Neutelings, returned recently as president of the TCHTA explained the bigger representation brings a stronger cross section. “We’ll have travel professionals, journalists, and we’ll have business professionals, stakeholders and potential investors and potential real estate buyers and it’s very exciting to be able to promote the Turks and Caicos as a family, as a team.”Nikheel Advani, Vice President of the Association explained how the cities were selected. “We sat down as a team to look at the data with the Tourist Board and the various parties to see where the best business comes out of, where the new flights are coming out of with partnerships. I will speak a little bit about Houston, where the new flight will come from United. The TCIAA together with the Tourist Board, the Hotel Association and the Government worked out to try to get these flights and we support having an increase in flights. We’re doing Houston, Dallas – they are a big market for us – we’ll start in Atlanta, we’re also going back to New York which is our key market as you all know, the North East and the tri-State is definitely very big for us; we will also do Chicago and Boston; Boston is the first time…”New Tourism Minister Hon Porsha Smith called it exciting. It allows us to showcase Turks and Caicos and it also helps us to build upon the expectation of increasing our tourism numbers and tourism arrivals so we are excited to be a part of this.” The Premier’s Tourism Road show will happen May 18-22. Survey shows TCI beaches keep visitors coming Recommended for you Related Items:houston, Portia smith, remier rufus ewing, tourism, tourist board Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

Afghans fear end of press freedoms golden age

first_imgIn this photo taken on 4 April 2019 an Afghan presenter takes part in a live broadcast at the Khurshid TV station in Kabul. Photo: AFPBeneath the gaze of the TV cameras a woman begins speaking, at first softly but with growing passion as she faces the “Butcher of Kabul” across a crowded auditorium and asks if he wants to apologise for alleged war crimes.Without missing a beat, Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, the ruthless former warlord blamed for rocket attacks which reduced much of the Afghan capital to rubble in the 1990s, declined to do so.The dramatic moment during a recent televised news debate highlights how far media freedom has come in Afghanistan, where — for now — traumatised civilians can stand and at least try to hold powerful men to account, live on camera.”Years ago, these kind of questions could get you killed, but now people can challenge the most dangerous people in mainstream and social media,” Mustafa Rahimi, a university student, said after watching the debate.But today, even as hundreds of media outlets proliferate across Afghanistan, consumers and journalists alike worry a potential peace deal between the Taliban and the US could sound the death knell for a golden age of press freedom.”We are concerned about a total or a partial ban on media,” Sediqullah Khaliq, the director of Hewad TV and radio in Kandahar — the birthplace of Taliban — told AFP.”There is fear that we may go back to a media blackout or having a state-controlled press.”While in power, the Taliban raged against traditional forms of mass communication and entertainment, banning television, movies and allowing only Islamist programming or propaganda to be broadcast on the only radio station, Voice of Sharia.Anyone caught watching TV faced punishment and risked having their television set smashed and then displayed from a lamppost.Almost all electronic products were outlawed as un-Islamic. For a while, trees in Kabul fluttered with the magnetic ribbon tape from destroyed cassettes.Photographs of living things were illegal, and ownership of a video player could lead to a public lashing.- A deadly trade -Afghanistan is the world’s deadliest place for journalists, who face many risks covering the conflict and who have sometimes been targeted for doing their job.Nine journalists, including AFP Kabul’s chief photographer Shah Marai, were killed in an Islamic State attack in April 2018.Media watchdog group Reporters Without Borders (RSF) reported that 2018 was the deadliest year on record for journalists in Afghanistan, with at least 15 media workers killed while working.Despite the risks, hundreds of media organisations have blossomed since 2001, and today there are more than 100 television channels, 284 radio stations and just over 400 newspapers and magazines, according to a government report.With one of the world’s lowest literacy rates, television and radio play a huge role in Afghan culture, and Afghans have grown accustomed to outlets holding their politicians to account.Warlords, politicians, Taliban sympathisers and government officials are openly challenged in televised debates, radio programmes and on social media.”We now play live music, women call in and share their problems on the radio. But even if the Taliban allow radios, I don’t think they would like our programmes,” said Mera Hamdam, a presenter at Zama private radio in Kandahar.”There is huge concern that we will lose all our achievements,” he said.Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said if they return to power, the insurgents would follow an Islamic interpretation of freedom of expression.”We won’t allow propaganda, insults and humiliation to people in society and religious values. We will allow those who work for the betterment of the society,” he told AFP.A sixth round of talks between the US and the Taliban wrapped up last week in Doha, with apparently little progress being made on several key issues.The two foes have for months been trying to hammer out a deal that could see foreign forces leave Afghanistan in return for a ceasefire, talks between Kabul and the Taliban, and a guarantee the country will not be used as a safe haven for terror groups.But observers worry that in a rush to quit Afghanistan after nearly 18 gruelling years of war, America might not push for safeguards of protections many Afghans now take for granted, including media freedoms and improved rights for women and other marginalised people.”Freedom of expression as a protective value should be incorporated into any document resulting from peace talks,” NAI, a leading media support agency, said in a statement.Rahimi, the university student, said he worried about Afghanistan going back to “the dark era”.last_img read more

New Research Suggests Blacks Have Predisposition to Alcoholism

first_imgAs the nation kicks off Alcohol Awareness Month, new research has come to light. It suggests that in addition to the stigma associated with alcoholism, African Americans suffer from a genetic predisposition to greater negative effects of alcohol consumption.Tamika Zapolski, assistant professor of psychology in the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), recently examined a paradox in African-American drinking. She found that despite African Americans reporting an initiation to drinking at an older age, lower rates of use, and lower levels of use in nearly all age groups, they still encountered higher levels of problems related to alcohol when compared to whites.“So much research has compared drinking habits and effects between African Americans and European Americans, but no one is truly investigating the reasons,” Zapolski said. “Understanding the reasons for these differences can ultimately improve diagnoses and intervention plans.”Zapolski posits that genetic, historical, and sociocultural factors, including cultural norms with religious beliefs and societal disapproval, make African Americans more likely to abstain from drinking and drink less than other groups. So why do Blacks encounter more negative consequences and greater risks for alcoholism or other alcohol problems?According to Zapolski, and others including Drs. Denise M. Scott and Robert E. Taylor, there exists a number of genetic variants of ADH and ALDH genes in African Americans that account for a higher rate of alcohol metabolism. This means that liquor breaks down quicker, is more potent, and has a greater effect in smaller amounts in their consumption. It also means a reduced likelihood of a family history of alcoholism and a greater likelihood of alcohol related chronic conditions such as cirrhosis.“In plain English, the data is saying that liquor is poison to some of our bodies, just like ingesting arsenic,” said Wendell Carby, a recovering alcoholic with 20 years’ sobriety. “I took my first drink as a freshman in college and was a drunk before the semester ended. It was like kryptonite to my body, but I couldn’t stop drinking even after it started making me ill.”Carby said the addiction was so swift and all-encompassing – creating damage in his nerves, stomach, and liver – that he had little time to brace himself for the financial difficulties and failed relationships that lay ahead. It was only when he began experiencing blackouts that Carby sought help.With growing concern over the prevalence of heavy drinking among African-American youth, Carby believes national campaigns should focus more attention on steering young adults away from alcohol. The rate of binge drinking (drinking five or more drinks on a single occasion for men) among African Americans ages 12 and up was 20.1 percent – compared with the national average of 22.9 percent. Similarly, African Americans aged 12 to 20 in 2013 reported past-month alcohol use at a rate of 17.8 percent, compared with the national average of 22.7 percent.“Our young people need to understand that alcohol is dangerous at any level because some of us are wired to become drunks and have to fight ‘putting the bottle down’ for the rest of our lives. The message should be the same as it was with crack in the ‘90s, ‘Just say no,’” Carby said.Alcohol intoxication can be harmful or risky for a variety of reasons: impaired brain function resulting in poor judgment, reduced reaction time, a loss of balance, coordination, motor skills, or slurred speech, as well as increased risk of certain cancers, stroke, and liver diseases (e.g., cirrhosis).last_img read more