What color are the cows: Brown or purple?

first_imgIf we did a survey among children both in Croatia and in other countries, and asked them the title question, it would be interesting to see the answers and which cow would prevail. Unfortunately, I’m more inclined to think that purple would predominate among the answers.In today’s modern times, people are increasingly separating from nature, human contact, direct communication and the real world, and everything is becoming digital, ie we live in a digital world. Returning to nature and experience without technology is one of the new trends in the world of tourism, as well as the consumption of organic, ecological and authentic dishes, living as locals, ie experiencing an authentic experience. That is why the very essence of tourism is precisely authenticity, and this is precisely our greatest tourist strength in the fight against globalization, because everything is becoming the same, standardized. And when that is the case, then you lose the motive of coming and the competitive advantage.Also, due to globalization and digitalization, people are increasingly living in modern cities, and the modern way of life and business is giving less and less space, ie time for themselves, family, children. Because of all this, today’s children have never seen a live cow, chicken, horse, goose… and do not know what they actually look like. Their perception is created by cartoons, marketing (Milka) and the digital world.If you live in Zagreb, Split, Rijeka and other major cities, ask yourself: When was the last time you saw a cow? When did your children see pets? Ask your child what color is a cow? How many eggs does a hen lay per day? Or maybe eggs are made in retail chains? In accordance with the above, I wonder if the “Zoo” of domestic animals can be a great tourist product? I’m sure he can, and here’s a concrete example.In the Nature Park near Sutivan on the island of Brač, children enjoy and get to know the animals.When Stipo Jurić and his wife Ana decided to turn the island karst into a nature park (private zoo) two kilometers from Sutivan on the island of Brač 14 years ago, he planned to build several dwellings with backyards where his children could see animals they usually know only from books. or television commercials and make sure the cow is not purple and the eggs are not laying in the mall.But today, in addition to sports fields, there is a 20 and 50-meter cable car, slides, trampoline, swing, wooden castle and restaurant with local food and animals rich zoo, all of which covers 16 thousand square meters of Sutivan Nature Park. And most importantly, a real attraction for all foreign tourists who come to the island of Brac. The most interesting, especially for children is the zoo where long-tailed blue and white peacocks, golden, silver and hunting pheasants, geese, ducks, domestic chickens live together, there is the African ostrich, Vietnamese pigs, wild boars, cows, sheep, goats and mouflon and other domestic animals. Stipo Jurić says that the jewel of the park are donkeys aged from a few days to a few years, and horses Suzi and Bela on which you can ride, and the environment is beautified by fruits, greenery and flowers.Love and care for wildlife is felt at every step of this nature park and visitors are sure to bring with them emotions that will remain in their lasting memory because the holiday is not only the sea and sun but also popcorn looking for corn and grass grazing cows. They don’t accidentally call Stipe’s property “Brač’s paradise for children”. “Once an elementary school teacher brought the children and spent among the hens so one student asked how many hens lay eggs a day. She said a dozen, and maybe only one a day… Well, sometimes we even laugh”, Stipo tells me.One hen lays one egg a year?By the way, to answer the question of how many hens lay eggs per day, once a day, ie an average of 280 eggs per year. And now imagine that in our tourism we use domestic eggs, not from large production plants, but from local family farms. How much does one large hotel consume eggs per day, and how much just one whole destination for tourism? Imagine how many eggs it is per day and how many people would be employed through hundreds of family farms, just in the production of organic and organic eggs? It is a tourism to strive for and then tourism makes sense, not to live off the rent of accommodation and the sun and the sea.Not to mention, how organic and organic products have a much higher price on the market, how all the trends are in this direction and how there is a great demand for the same, as well as that the cream of homemade eggs are bright yellow, not “white” colors. Just look at the prices of organic products in retail chains, prices are 30-40% more expensive, if some products and much more. And interestingly, there is a market that is growing from year to year.Sutivan Nature Park has become an excellent quality tourist content offered by the island of Brac and there children can see and experience animals in the true sense, not just watch them because they are given the opportunity to touch, feed and groom animals. Also, in addition to all this, children get all the information about how animals live, what they eat, how they behave, etc.…And this is where the greatest magic happens, it is this direct contact and interaction between children and animals that is invaluable and an experience that is not forgotten. It is remembered “for a lifetime”. “Love for my late wife Ana keeps me from doing what we started together and because of her I do it and I will never leave the park – I live for all this…”, Says Stipo Jurić.This is exactly what is felt at every step, this is not a commercial park, everything is local and you feel that personal touch and care for the whole park. This is not a job, this is a way of life, says Barba Stipo. He adds that all the animals were registered with the Croatian Livestock Association, and the veterinary inspection was there several times. “One inspector acted very seriously and talked a little, so I was afraid she would find any mistake. She also looked at the wild boars that had just pollinated and saw where they were housed because the cubs require special care. She did not say anything, but she wrote in the minutes that the animals live in extremely good conditions, are housed in a house with a garden and are all tame, which is a sign that they were cared for with a lot of attention and love, “said Stipo Juric. where wild boars have young, is the best proof that the living conditions of the animals are excellent. By the way, all animals are registered in the Croatian Livestock Association.Guests find out about his nature park via the internet, there is their promotional material in the local tourist board and many who come once, come again. “My marketing is satisfied visitors, because those who come all these years, return every year and so they recommend others to visit us,” says Barba Stipo and although he does not count exactly all visitors, he estimates that this Brac paradise was visited by over 10 visitors.The nature park near Sutivan is not difficult to find – from the direction of Supetar you have to pass the main entrance to Sutivan and after a slight uphill there is a signpost that will direct the traveler to the park, and from the direction of Milna there is a sign the park is 500 meters.Finally, let me share an anecdote.Namely, while I was talking to Barba Stipe, my son came up to me, got into the conversation and told me. ” Dad, Dad has another parrot, come see and he pulls me to show me another parrot he found. You know, Dad, there’s a red parrot. Come see“Says my son David.That says it all and of course how even after a year, my son still remembers the animals from Brač. A story that has been told dozens of times, a story that is not forgotten, a story that spreads further and a story that remains in the memory of “the whole” life. I am grateful that Barba Stipo provided me with unforgettable experiences from my vacation.Yes, a “zoo” with domestic and indigenous animals can and is a great tourist product, so I wonder why we don’t have them anymore. It is an experience, an emotion and a story. It is tourism.last_img read more

Indonesia, South Korea join hands in COVID-19 response

first_imgBetween the two countries, the COVID-19 outbreak began much earlier in South Korea, near the end of January, whereas Indonesia only reported its first confirmed case in early March.At the time, there were so many unknown factors to the disease, but now Indonesia stands to benefit from the wealth of data available to determine the direction of its COVID-19 response.“[It] would practically make the unknown that little bit more familiar, and researchers could shed more light on what works and what doesn’t or what policies could be pursued,” Umar said during a virtual discussion hosted by the Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), on Wednesday.South Korea endured one of the worst early outbreaks of the disease outside China, and while it never imposed a compulsory lockdown, strict social distancing had been widely observed since March. Indonesia looks to learn more from South Korea in raising its capacity to curb viral infections, officials have said, as the special strategic partners work together in the multilateral response to the COVID-19 pandemic.Having recorded some of the highest transmission rates in all of Southeast Asia, Indonesia has struggled to “flatten the curve” of infection due to its limited testing capacity and slapdash policy decisions.Indonesian Ambassador to South Korea Umar Hadi said the Korean Center for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) and other related institutions could help Indonesian authorities respond better to the viral outbreak. Now the South appears to have brought its outbreak under control thanks to an extensive “trace, test and treat” program that has drawn widespread praise, AFP reports.In a population of 51 million, its death toll is little more than 250, and new cases have slowed to just a handful – 13 in the past three days, all of them arriving international passengers.At its peak, the country reported 909 cases in late February, Yonhap news agency reported.In contrast, since President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo announced the first confirmed cases, Indonesia has recorded 12,776 infections and 930 deaths, according to Thursday’s official tally.“I think Indonesia can learn from this valuable data,” Umar said.“We need a kind of more structured, institutionalized communication or sharing between the KCDC and maybe the BNPB [National Disaster Mitigation Agency] or the Health Ministry in Indonesia so we can also benefit from the data collected in [South] Korea.”CSIS executive director Philips J. Vermonte pointed out that the pandemic had exposed vulnerabilities in various aspects of governance in Indonesia, especially its decision making and institutional capacity.Unlike South Korea, which had taken swift action against the outbreak, Philips said Indonesia had been very slow to respond in the beginning, and then proceeded with a half-hearted policy.The government took almost two weeks after its first COVID-19 case to set up a rapid response team, and the large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) were only introduced by the end of March, at a time when more than 1,500 people were already infected by the coronavirus.Since the onset of the pandemic, Indonesia and South Korea have joined hands to cooperate on mitigating the health crisis.In late March, South Korea put Indonesia on its priority list for quarantine supplies exports, which includes test kits.The government in Seoul recently pledged to provide a US$500,000 grant to Indonesia in the form of test kits and rechargeable power sprayers for sanitation.Previously, the head of the national COVID-19 task force, Doni Monardo, said Indonesia exported ready-to-use personal protective equipment (PPE) to South Korea as compensation for procuring raw materials from the South to meet domestic needs.The Foreign Ministry’s director general for Asia, Pacific and African affairs, Desra Percaya, noted that the two countries just concluded negotiations on the Indonesia-South Korea Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (IK-CEPA), but said that, “in order for this to work, we should first address, adapt and adjust to the ‘new normal’ by working hand in hand to revive international trade as an engine for growth”.The two countries concluded the negotiations in November last year and look to sign the CEPA by the first half of 2020.South Korean Ambassador to Indonesia Kim Chang-beom hailed the cooperation, saying the two countries have worked well when compared to partnerships with other countries.“President Moon [Jae-in] and President Jokowi spoke the same language when they attended the G20 special virtual summit in April,” he said during the discussion on Wednesday.“And then our foreign ministers Ibu Retno [Marsudi] and Minister Kang [Kyung-hwa] have led efforts to tackle COVID-19 through global collaboration and coordinated responses at various forums.”Topics :last_img read more

Men’s volleyball: USC falls short to No. 12 UC Santa Barbara

first_imgIn a back and forth match, the Trojans fell to the No. 12 ranked UC Santa Barbara Gauchos in five sets on Wednesday. Gauchos junior Jacob Delson led the way with 22 kills and 4 aces in the 25-21, 21-25, 25-18, 19-25, 15-10 victory. The Trojans now stand at 2-4 overall and 1-2 in the MPSF.For the Trojans, getting another win against a top 25 team would have been a confidence-booster, but they fell just short this time. On the positive side, they once again received solid contributions from several players. Senior Lucas Yoder finished with 17 kills, while freshman Aaron Strange added 14 kills and eight digs. On top of that, senior Andy Benesh had 11 kills (hitting .526) and six blocks and sophomore Matt Douglas had seven digs.The Trojans could grow a lot from this game. Though the final result wasn’t what they were looking for, they fought hard against one of the nation’s top teams and nearly pulled out a win. It was especially important for them to put up a strong effort following a devastating 3-0 loss to CSUN in the previous match.It will be key for the Trojans to continue their physical and consistent play as they take on No. 2 UCLA on Friday at 8 p.m.last_img read more

Fair Play… GVC Holdings outlines year of wholesale CSR change

first_img StumbleUpon Submit Share Share Related Articles GVC – YGAM’s Parent Hub is a vital tool for honest and open conversations August 4, 2020 GVC hails SportsAid programme developing next generation of British athletes August 7, 2020 EPIC and Whysup ‘continue to make real change’ with partnership renewal August 19, 2020 Virginia McDowell – GVC HoldingsFTSE100 gambling group GVC Holdings has this morning published its 2019 ‘Fair Play – Corporate Social Responsibility Report’ outlining the multiple changes governing the company’s long-term corporate sustainability objectives.In the report’s forward statement, GVC Independent Non-Executive Director Virginia McDowell acknowledges the new responsibilities demands placed on the company which now operates global gaming’s largest online gambling portfolio, employing 25,000 staff worldwide.“GVC’s growth has brought with it a commensurate expansion in the expectations around how we manage our responsibilities towards society, particularly as they relate to safer gambling,” said McDowell.“And let me be clear from the outset: Our ambition is to be the safest and most trusted operator in the world.”As a corporate advisor, McDowell has been charged with leading GVC’s ‘dedicated CSR Committee’ – a governance-level unit which has reviewed all corporate policies ‘covering regulatory compliance, AML, responsible gaming, health and safety, environmental impact, data protection and diversity in the workplace’.Furthermore, as a governance function, the CSR Committee will offer guidance to GVC leaders and stakeholders on social responsibility strategies, oversight, planning and coordination.“Sitting below the Board CSR Committee, the CSR Steering Group consists of functional leaders from across the business, including Investor Relations, HR, Legal, Health, Safety and Security, Operations and Communications,” explained the GVC report.“Convened by our Head of CSR, the Group oversees implementation of the CSR strategy, coordinating delivery across all operating units and central function.”Moving forward, an enlarged GVC Holdings will operate under the mandate of its ‘Fair Play – CSR strategy’ which sets out ‘priorities and activities across the areas where GVC has an impact on society’.GVC states that its new CSR strategy has been developed with ‘a deep understanding of where the industry is heading’, which will see GVC operate an ‘emerging framework’, promoting social responsibility practices across GVC’s current operational and stakeholder value chains.Treating CSR as a corporate discipline, GVC has appointed Grainne Hurst as the FTSE firm’s first Director of Responsible Gambling, supported by former group communications lead Jay Dossetter as Head of CSR.2018 saw GVC launch its ‘Changing for the Bettor’ campaign, setting out the FTSE firm’s ‘seven pillars’ for promoting safe play, fair gambling and better standards.Grainne Hurst – GVC HoldingsThe ‘Changing for the Bettor’ campaign has further seen GVC form strategic collaborations with gambling harm minimisation consultancy EPIC Risk Management (EPIC), in addition to supporting the Harvard Medical School’s ‘Division on Addiction‘ with a $5 million research funding on addiction behaviours, triggers and analyses.“We were very clear when we launched our strategy that it should not remain a static document, but instead would be constantly evolving and adapting as new opportunities and challenges occur,” said Grainne Hurst, Director of Responsible Gambling at GVC Holdings.“We are currently working on a number of projects, including additional treatment provision for gambling-related harm, digital app therapy provisions, the use of AI to help minimise harm and our research partnership with Harvard.“We are determined that responsible gambling is a non-negotiable part of the way we do business, and ‘Changing for the Bettor’ is our considered attempt to lead the way in minimising the risk from gambling-related harm.”A year since the launch of ‘Changing for the Bettor’, GVC governance states that the company is ready to pursue a series of ‘Quantitative commitments’ for future yearsGVC’s ‘Quantitative commitments’ related to safer gambling include:Doubling the amount GVC donates to problem gambling research, education and treatment bodies to 0.2% of UK gross gaming revenue, rising gradually to 1% by 2022 (the equivalent of £20 million).Starting a safer gambling awareness and education programmes for school children through GVC’s partnership with EPIC Risk Management.Developing the firm’s partnership with Harvard Medical School to better understand and reduce the potential for problem gambling behaviour through rigorous research.last_img read more