Vermont has lowest rate of wireless-only households

first_imgOklahoma leads the nation in the percentage of households with cell phones only, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than a quarter of households (26.2 percent) in Oklahoma had only wireless and no landline phones in 2007. On the other end of the spectrum, only 5.1 percent of households in Vermont were wireless-only in 2007.The report from CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics, “Wireless Substitution: State-level Estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, January-December 2007,” is the latest report on wireless substitution in the United States.”These findings are important to CDC because many of our largest surveys are done on calls to landline phone numbers. All of those adults with only cell phones are being missed in these surveys,” said Stephen J. Blumberg, health scientist with CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics and lead author of the study.In addition to Oklahoma, states with the highest percentage of wireless-only households are Utah (25.5 percent), Nebraska (23.2 percent), Arkansas (22.6 percent) and Idaho (22.1 percent). States with the lowest percentages, following Vermont, are Connecticut (5.6 percent), Delaware (5.7 percent), South Dakota (6.4 percent) and Rhode Island (7.9 percent).The report also shows the percentage of adults who use only wireless phones is also highest in Oklahoma (25.1 percent) and lowest in Delaware (4 percent). The District of Columbia also had a high percentage of adults who use cellphones only (25.4 percent).The percentage of wireless-only phone use among households and adults varies greatly within regions. For example, in the Midwest, the state that has the most wireless-only households, Nebraska (23.2 percent), borders the state with the least, South Dakota (6.4 percent).Results from previous CDC reports on wireless substitution show wireless-only phone use continues to grow on a national level. A recent report found that 17.5 percent of U.S. homes had only wireless telephones during the first half of 2008 — nearly 3 percentage points greater than the estimate for 2007 (14.7 percent). The percentage of adults using only wireless-only phones also grew from 13.6 percent in 2007 to 16.1 percent in the first half of 2008.The full report is available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhsr/nhsr014.htm(link is external).CONTACT: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center forHealth Statistics Office of Communication, +1-301-458-4800/PRNewswire-USNewswire — March 11/SOURCE Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlast_img read more

Vermont among top performers on national math assessment

first_imgSource: Vermont DOE. 10.14.2009# END # Only one state outperformed Vermont in eighth-grade math and only two states outperformed Vermont in fourth-grade math on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), according to results released by the US Department of Education today.Highlights for Vermont results include:· Vermont students were only outperformed by students in New Hampshire and Massachusetts on the fourth-grade exam.· Vermont students were only outperformed by students in Massachusetts on the eighth-grade exam.· Vermont was one of only five states or jurisdictions to show growth in scores in both grade levels, and all three New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) participants were included in that group of five (Vermont, Rhode Island and New Hampshire). The other two were Nevada and the District of Columbia.“What is really impressive about these results is that the three NECAP states were already star performers,” said Commissioner of Education Armando Vilaseca. “It is easy to show growth when you are on the lower end, but for these well-performing states to continue to show growth is notable.”Vermont has shown steady gains on NAEP in both fourth and eighth grade math since 2003. Fifty-one percent of Vermont grade four students achieved the rating of “at or above proficient” compared to 38 percent of fourth-graders nationally. Forty-three percent of Vermont grade eight students achieved the rating of “at or above Proficient” compared to 33 percent of eighth-graders nationally.Poverty-based achievement gaps are still a concern. The gap between students eligible for the free/reduced priced lunch program and their peers is formidable (19 points in grade four and 23 points in grade eight).“While it is incredibly exciting that Vermont students perform so well compared to other states and continue to post gains on NAEP, it is disappointing that our low-income population did not improve to our expectations this year,” said NAEP Coordinator Susan Hayes. “We must determine how to address the stubborn achievement gap that persists between disadvantaged youngsters and their wealthier peers.”Vermont students took the exam during the months of January, February and March of this year. As part of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), all states must participate in NAEP assessments in reading and mathematics at grades four and eight every other year. National and state-to-state comparisons are based on data from public schools only. Results for individual schools or students are not reported. For Vermont’s NAEP results, visit: http://education.vermont.gov/new/html/pgm_assessment/data.html#naep(link is external).  For a complete set of national results, visit http://www.nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard(link is external).For more information, contact Susan Hayes at (802) 828-5892 or susan.hayes@state.vt.us(link sends e-mail) or Jill Remick at (802) 828-3154 or jill.remick@state.vt.us(link sends e-mail).last_img read more

Ga. State looks to sweep La.-Lafeyette

first_img February 5, 2020 ___For more AP college basketball coverage: https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and http://twitter.com/AP_Top25___This was generated by Automated Insights, http://www.automatedinsights.com/ap, using data from STATS LLC, https://www.stats.com Associated Press Ga. State looks to sweep La.-Lafeyettecenter_img FEARLESS FRESHMEN: Louisiana-Lafayette’s Jalen Johnson, Mylik Wilson and Cedric Russell have collectively accounted for 52 percent of all Ragin’ Cajuns scoring this season, though that figure has dropped to 28 percent over the last five games.DEFENSIVE IMPROVEMENTS: The Ragin’ Cajuns have given up only 70.8 points per game to conference opponents thus far, an improvement from the 78.2 per game they allowed in non-conference play.WATCH OUT FOR WILLIAMS: Kane Williams has connected on 37.8 percent of the 82 3-pointers he’s attempted and has made 7 of 23 over the last five games. He’s also converted 73.7 percent of his free throws this season.WINLESS WHEN: Louisiana-Lafayette is 0-9 this year when it scores 65 points or fewer and 9-5 when it scores at least 66.UNDEFEATED WHEN: Georgia State is a perfect 10-0 when it holds an opponent to 73 points or fewer. The Panthers are 5-8 when opponents score more than 73.DID YOU KNOW: The Georgia State offense has scored 79 points per game this season, ranking the Panthers 22nd among Division I teams. The Louisiana-Lafayette defense has allowed 73.8 points per game to opponents (ranked 263rd overall). Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditGeorgia State (15-8, 8-4) vs. Louisiana-Lafayette (9-14, 4-8)Cajun Dome, Lafayette, Louisiana; Thursday, 8 p.m. ESTBOTTOM LINE: Georgia State goes for the season sweep over Louisiana-Lafayette after winning the previous matchup in Atlanta. The teams last met on Jan. 9, when the Panthers outshot Louisiana-Lafayette from the field 54.2 percent to 28.8 percent and made five more 3-pointers en route to a 38-point victory.last_img read more