Wales v Northern Ireland – five things we learned

first_imgBilled as another Battle of Britain, the game is more likely to be remembered as a war of attrition. After some superb performances in the group stage, Northern Ireland goalkeeper Michael McGovern wasn’t forced to make a save until parrying away Gareth Bale’s free-kick on 58 minutes. That was his lone contribution to the match as there was nothing the Hamilton number one could do about Gareth McAuley’s own goal. Wales goalkeeper Wayne Hennessey made two routine first-half stops, but he wasn’t unduly tested either.Bale delivers again Gareth Bale failed to score for the first time in four games at the European Championship in what was largely a frustrating 90 minutes. But the Real Madrid star played a pivotal role in sending Wales through to the last eight. Shackled by defenders for much of the afternoon Bale found a pocket of space when he was fed by Aaron Ramsey down the left and his devilish cross resulted in Gareth McAuley bundling into his own net on 75 minutes as Wales striker Hal Robson-Kanu lurked just behind. Bale had earlier come closest to breaking the deadlock when his dipping free-kick was batted away by Michael McGovern.Lonesome Lafferty Recalled Northern Ireland Kyle Lafferty striker cut a lonesome figure against Wales’ three-man central defence. Overlooked for the final two group games, Lafferty replaced Conor Washington in Paris but was made to toil against Ashley Williams — flanked by James Chester and Ben Davies — with little opportunity to add to his seven goals from the qualifiers. Washington was introduced on 69 minutes to provide extra support, but it was to no avail.‘Cup tie feeling’ Northern Ireland coach Michael O’Neill had predicted the clash would have a “cup tie feeling” and he wasn’t mistaken. With the prize of a quarter-final spot at stake, neither team was inclined to gamble and rue a costly mistake. Had the encounter gone to extra time and then possibly penalties and supported O’Neill’s initial instinct, it would not have been a surprise.Opportunity beckons Making their first major finals appearance since the 1958 World Cup, Wales have matched their quarter-final run from 58 years ago. With Belgium, a side Chris Coleman’s team took four points off during qualifying, or Hungary awaiting them in the last eight, Welsh fans can be forgiven for dreaming that the Euro 2016 can go on.Share on: WhatsApp Pages: 1 2 3 Battle of attrition Paris, France | AFP |Wales beat Northern Ireland 1-0 to reach the quarter-finals of Euro 2016 on Saturday. Here are five things we learned from the match.last_img read more

The Mayday Foundation Announces Partnership with Parenting Coach, Emily McMason

first_imgFacebook96Tweet0Pin0Submitted by The Mayday FoundationWhen a family’s life is turned upside down by a cancer diagnosis, there are many pieces to pick up. In Thurston and Grays Harbor Counties, families are able to turn to The Mayday Foundation for immediate, practical financial support.  Now, this assistance extends beyond getting help with paying household expenses and into the emotional side of being a parent while coping with cancer.“My time with The Mayday Foundation families is an important way to be a part of our community response to caring for those affected by cancer,” said Emily McMason. Photo courtesy: The Mayday Foundation“Along with financial assistance, The Mayday Foundation now includes a complimentary session with parenting coach, Emily McMason,” explained founder and executive director, Amy Rowley.  “We are able to expand our support of the family past paying rent and mortgages and delivering gas and grocery cards and allow each family to access Emily’s vast knowledge of parenting techniques. Parenting advice and coaching is critical since most families have not coped with a health care crisis of this magnitude.”Emily McMason, who holds a masters degree in education from Harvard University, is also a mother of two children being raised in Olympia. “A healthy community is one in which we reach out and care for one another. It matters to me to give back to the community in which I live, work and raise my children. My time with The Mayday Foundation families is an important way to be a part of our community response to caring for those affected by cancer,” said McMason. “My passion for parents and children makes working with The Mayday Foundation a natural connection.”“Emily’s generous donation of time means local families can gain the emotional support they need to cope with cancer and still be the parent they want to be to their children,” added Rowley.  “The first concern, when a parent is diagnosed with cancer, is ‘will my kids be ok, will they be able to recover from this upheaval?’ Providing access to a trained, professional parenting coach rounds out The Mayday Foundation’s support.”For example, parents may choose to talk with Emily about processing the news, adjusting to new normals, redefining family balance and boundaries, help with understanding the reactions of those you love or imagining the family with a post-cancer perspective.“A cancer diagnosis isn’t simply about our health—it is about our whole life,” added McMason in summary. “Our parenting role doesn’t stop when cancer becomes a part of a family’s life—instead it gets more complex. Spending time with families as they navigate these new spaces is an incredibly meaningful way for me to give back to my community. It’s an honor to work with The Mayday Foundation families and provide emotional support as well as practical tools for parenting as they cope with cancer.”To connect with Emily McMason, visit the Evolving Parents website or call 360-951-0563. Coaching is available to individuals, couples or whole families.To keep up with how The Mayday Foundation is making an impact in Thurston and Grays Harbor counties, visit www.maydayfoundation.org or follow the non-profit organization on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter.last_img read more

Red Bank’s ‘Couch to 5K’ Running Program Takes First Steps

first_imgby John BurtonRED BANK – For Red Bank Parks and Recreation Director Charlie Hoffmann, the aim is simple: no matter how sedentary they have been, those who signed up for his running program can start moving and get healthier.“It’s my hope it’ll plant the seed,” in the participants and they’ll continue on this fitness journey, Hoffmann said of his program “Couch Potato to 5K,” which kicked off this week.Hoffmann, who is relatively new to the Red Bank job, has conducted similar programs for about nine years, in Fair Haven, where he had previously worked as rec director, as well as in Manalapan and in South Carolina.His program is along the same lines as a national one called “Girls on the Run” and the idea is pretty simple, Hoffmann maintained—finding people’s comfort level, getting them off the couch and getting them to remain active. “It’s both an action and life enrichment course,” he explained.For the first session on a cold Monday evening this week, 13 participants joined Hoffmann at East Side Park, at the Mechanic Street/Harrison Avenue intersection, where Hoffmann told the group what to expect when they meet on Wednesdays and Mondays, from March through June.After a joke-filled introduction to the group, Hoffmann tells them to “run at a comfortable level and if you need to walk, you walk.” The idea being, he said, to extend the distances over time, “So it’ll be more running than walking,” as time progresses.Ultimately, Hoffmann hopes to have participants shape up sufficiently to be able to take on a 5K run in June.Before they start Hoffmann has them take a deep breath and give a U.S. Marine-style grunt. The grunt is for a reason, but he won’t tell them until later in the training season.Debbie Graf said she joined “Because I am a couch potato…I needed to get in shape.”Along with that, “I wanted to see who was doing it,” and was pleasantly surprised to see a neighbor had joined.Joining her, too, was Graf’s husband, John McCracken, who is already a regular runner, figuring he’d provide moral support as well. McCracken acknowledged he had already run 6 ½ miles after work before joining Graf for this program. “I’ll probably cramp up before I finish here,” he kidded.“The hardest part is done,” Hoffmann told them. “You’re here,” and are starting the program.James Scavone, executive director of Red Bank RiverCenter, the local business coalition, decided to get involved. “I’ve been trying to lose weight for a long time,” and thought getting more exercise would help, he said.The group did a series of stretches and some brief walk-run combinations for short distances for the first outing. Hoffmann reminded everyone that “Running is a little like making love.” He let that sink in before explaining, “You don’t have to be good at it to enjoy it.”“Anyone out of breath? In pain?” he asked afterwards. “That’ll change. It’ll go away,” as the sessions progress, he promised.Claudia Ferreira, a municipal employee, said she regularly exercises but conceded “I do better with a plan.”“It was fun,” she said of the first session and looked forward to continuing.“My real reason is really to get heart healthy and lose weight,” explained Doreen Hoffmann (no relation to Charlie), who also works for the town. She found the session “non-intimidating” and credited Charlie Hoffmann for setting the comforting tone.She’s not interested in being a serious runner but, “I feel however I end, jogging, walking, running,” she noted, “it’s pushing me to obtain a goal.”“My hope is that at some point maybe someone will come back to me and say ‘I’m running in the Boston Marathon,’” Charlie said. “I hope they stick with it.”There is still time to sign up. But that window is closing as the group continues with its twice weekly training, getting in shape, Hoffmann explained.The program costs $30 and participants get a T-shirt, the sessions and “homework” instructing different exercises and other activities members can do between trainings.For more information, call the borough Parks and Recreation Department, 732-530-2782.last_img read more

NCAA allows Division I coaches to spend more virtual time with athletes

first_imgCoaches can only spend eight virtual hours a week with student-athletes, according to a press release from the NCAA. They must only participate in “nonphysical countable activities” which can include film review, chalk talks and team meetings, according to the same press release.  “This change not only allows coaches to continue to educate their student-athletes but also fosters the connectivity that comes with team-based activities,” said M. Grace Calhoun, the Council chair and athletic director at Penn.  On Thursday, the NCAA announced its Council Coordination Committee voted to allow Division I coaches in all sports to have more virtual connection with their teams. This policy will take effect starting on Monday, April 20 and last until May 31. center_img The NCAA is also requiring student-athletes to be given at least one day a week off without any nonphysical countable activities.last_img read more