ACTRA Toronto vows to do more to protect members in a postWeinstein

first_imgFlooded with calls after recent reporting on sexual harassment allegations against industry titans Harvey Weinstein and James Toback, the Toronto chapter of the union that represents English language actors in Canada is resolving to do more to protect its members against predators. Advertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Tova said the calls “don’t stop,” naming everyone from Weinstein and Toback to “a myriad of other names in very, very surprising spaces.” “They’re preying on young 19-year-olds, 20-year-olds who don’t have careers yet, they’re not preying on Meryl Streep,” she added.The ACTRA Toronto, which represents more than 15,000 Canadian performers, has hired a special advisor to review their own policies, practices and training on harassment. If someone has a complaint against a fellow member they can file a grievance, but it gets trickier when the complaint is against someone outside of that union, like a director or producer.READ MORE Facebookcenter_img Advertisement Login/Register With: “No matter what we’ve been doing, and we’ve been doing a lot of really good things in this area, for a number of years, it’s not good enough,” Theresa Tova, president of Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists (ACTRA) Toronto told Metro. Reporting on Harvey Weinstein has brought sexual assault and sexual harassment to the forefront. CHRIS PIZZELLO/INVISION/AP, FILE) Twitterlast_img

Heartland puts out casting call for young Alberta girl who speaks her

first_imgAdvertisement “They need to be confident, outgoing, not shy,” Fisekci says. “Those are the traits I would be looking for in the audition room. Kids who have no fear.”While experienced child actresses will not be rejected, Fisekci stresses that experience is not needed for the role.“I find that kids at this age, if you just ask them to be themselves you get much better performances,” she says.Heartland has a good track record in discovering young talent. Vancouver actress Alisha Newton joined the cast in Season 6 and quickly became a fan favourite as Georgie Crawley.Fisekci could not reveal more about the new character for fear of spoilers. Whoever is chosen will be required to work periodically between Aug. 9 to Sept. 28, which is when the season’s later episodes will be shot. Production on Season 12 of Heartland begins June 1. It was unclear how many episodes the new character will appear in.Auditions will be by appointment only and will take place in mid to late June. Parents are asked to submit a recent photo (camera phone pictures are fine) and a small bio that includes the child’s date of birth, height and parent or guardian contact information.The deadline is June 10.  Submissions should be made to rfcasting18@gmail.comBy ERIC VOLMERS LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Twitter Producers of CBC’s Alberta-shot, Heartland are looking to their own backyard for its newest cast member, who will play a recurring character in the show’s 12th season.“They just really want to give a local person the opportunity,” says Rhonda Fisekci, Heartland’s casting director. “Heartland is a staple in Alberta so they do want to reach out to the local community. I’m sure we can find her here.”Fisekci says the girl should be Caucasian, aged six to (a small) nine, have blond hair and blue eyes. She will be playing “a little busybody who has opinions on everything and speaks her mind.” Advertisement Facebook Login/Register With:last_img

TIFF ADDS NATALIE PORTMANS VOX LUX AS FEST COMPLETES ITS LINEUP

first_img Twitter Login/Register With: Advertisement Advertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Women directed 34% of this year’s TIFF lineup, the fest reports, up from the 33% from 2017. Natalie Portman as a Madonna-like pop superstar in Vox Lux and Isabel Huppert as a sinister widow in Greta help round out the big-screen offerings for next month’s Toronto International Film Festival, Sept. 6-16.The two movies complete the festival’s Special Presentations slate of highly rated filmmakers and storytellers, bringing the program’s total to 24 titles. Along with the 46 Discovery program titles by new international filmmakers that were also announced Tuesday, TIFF’s 2018 roster is complete: 255 features and 88 shorts, 343 films in all.That’s up three titles from 2017, which had 340 films (256 features and 84 shorts), but the total is still far lower than in other years, before TIFF trimmed its offerings to make the 11-day fest more manageable. Facebooklast_img

WRITER DIRECTOR STAR – CATHERINE REITMAN IS A REAL LIFE WORKIN MOM

first_imgAdvertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Workin’ Moms sold to FX first, before they passed and the CBC snapped it up. How is producing TV in Canada different than in the States? Are there things you can do here that you can’t do there?Absolutely. Coming to Canada has been incredibly liberating, both creatively and production-wise for [my husband and co-producer/co-star] Philip and I. For one, we’re partners in the creation of our show, as opposed to the usual contact you’d get in the United States, where you’re an employee on a show of your own creation. So, being able to feel ownership not only is exhilarating because it’s yours, but also you feel so much more responsibility, you know? If the show fails or succeeds, it’s on you. Catherine Reitman is living that working mom life—hard. She is the showrunner on CBC’s comedy hit Workin’ Moms (which she produces with her husband Philip Sternberg); she also writes and directs for the show. Oh, and stars on it. In addition to her show baby, she has two little ones at home. (She also pops up on Black-ish from time to time.) Reitman has won fans among the mom brigade and beyond for her raw, honest portrayal of the trials and tribulations of motherhood, from postpartum depression to breastfeeding boobs. With season three premiering today, we spoke with Reitman about directing cranky old men, tackling #MeToo on-screen, and working with her hubs.What are some issues and experiences that you felt were missing from the modern TV landscape that you wanted to show on Workin’ Moms?I felt that there was a limited portrayal of how mothers appeared on television. When I first got pregnant, my husband and I were huge consumers of premium cable television, and we were watching all of these shows, and it would either be the B-storyline of a show like Homeland, where she’s a working mother, or you have even smaller C-storylines on a show like Mad Men. And when mother storylines were A-storylines, they felt either very broad or kind of melodramatic—I wanted to see the comedy that I was used to watching with my husband, but my story. And I couldn’t find that anywhere. Advertisement Twitter Facebook Advertisementlast_img

CANADIANS STEPHAN JAMES AND WINNIE HARLOW ARE ELLE CANADA COVER STARS FOR

first_imgActor Stephan James and model Winnie Harlow may have careers that have led them far away from home, but their connection to Toronto is stronger than ever. In our cover story, shot on the streets of Little Jamaica, we find out what it takes to walk a path of your own creation and go up against the odds and win.WINNIE HARLOWWinnie Harlow is striding down Eglinton West in Toronto’s Little Jamaica like she’s on a runway in Paris. She’s wearing a floor-length houndstooth Chanel coat and not much else. Traffic has come to a halt as our photographer orbits her, and people passing by are scrambling for their phones so they can capture the moment. And this is definitely a moment. Advertisement Facebook Advertisement Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitterlast_img

Federal court gives huge victory to Metis and nonstatus Indians

first_imgAPTN National NewsMetis and non-status Indians won a “huge” victory Tuesday when the Federal Court of Canada ruled they fall under the federal government’s responsibility.It took years to get to this point, but the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples called the ruling a victory that was worth the wait.“We’re pleased. It’s a start. It’s a huge decision. It really has brought forward that Metis and non-status Indians are now recognized,” said a spokesperson for CAP who added more information will be available at a news conference Tuesday afternoon in Ottawa. “We will be responding in-depth once our legal has given more in-depth view of the potential impacts.”The ruling means Metis peoples are the responsibility of the federal government and can negotiate treaties and issues such as education, health and tax exemptions.However, the court didn’t order the government to begin negotiations. So when, and if, that happens remains in question.“The evidence concerning non-status Indians establishes that such persons were considered within the broad class of ‘Indians,’” said Justice Michael Phelan “The situation regarding Metis was more complex.”Phelan said nevertheless, Metis generally are often treated as Indians and have similar limitations, as well as suffer the same burdens and discrimination.More to come …last_img

Akwesasne council blasts Public Safety Minister Toews over John Wayne attitude

first_imgAPTN National News OTTAWA–Public Safety Minister Vic Toews has taken on a “John Wayne attitude towards First Nation people” through his government’s plan to create a 50 RCMP officer task force and introduce tougher penalties to fight the underground tobacco trade, according to the Mohawk Council of Akwesasne.Toews announced Tuesday that in addition to a new anti-contraband tobacco unit, the government would introduce a bill to set mandatory minimum jail terms for people involved in the black market tobacco trade.“Sending additional troops from the RCMP isn’t going to resolve the contraband issue,” said a statement from Akwesasne Grand Chief Mike Mitchell. “There are already an insurmountable number of external policing agencies surrounding Akwesasne with the same goal.”Toews’ office did not respond to a request for comment.The RCMP said in an email to APTN National News that the new task force would get no new money and the cost would be absorbed under the existing budget. The RCMP also acknowledged that the rate of tobacco smuggling is decreasing.“The RCMP contraband tobacco seizures have declined over the past few years, which indicates that our efforts have an impact,” said an emailed statement from the RCMP. “However, it remains robust and a lucrative activity for organized crime.”The RCMP said the new task force would deployed “in areas known to have the highest level of contraband tobacco activity” including southern Ontario and the “central St. Lawrence seaway,” which is in and around Akwesasne Mohawk territory.The majority of black market tobacco flows from the U.S., through Akwesasne and into markets across Canada. There are also informal cigarette factories in Kahnawake, which sits next to Montreal, and Six Nations, which is also home to an established tobacco firm called Grand River Enterprises.Akwesasne has also seen a high level of marijuana, cocaine and human trafficking flow through its territory and the presence of organized crime elements has created tensions with local residents.The Akwesasne council, however, said no amount of policing could ever stem the flow of smuggling because it thrives from the jurisdictional tangle that covers the Mohawk territory. Akwesasne district Chief Steve Thomas said Toews should have first visited and met with the people of Akwesasne before launching another wrong-headed plan against the tobacco trade.“(Toews) would see that the problem isn’t the people of Akwesasne, but the multitude of borders that dissect Akwesasne into two countries, two provinces and one state,” said Thomas, in the statement. “The international boundary line zigzags around islands in the St. Lawrence River, making it extremely difficult for contraband to be seized and this weakness has been exploited by external criminal organizations.”The territory of Akwesasne, which sits about 120 kilometres west of Montreal, crosses the Quebec, Ontario and New York State borders.“The long-term solution…is removing the international boundary to one side or the other of Akwesasne…This would make our community whole again and the jurisdictional issues we face would cease to exist,” said Mitchell.Akwesasne is currently negotiating with the Ontario and Quebec governments to legalize the tobacco trade through internal self regulation.In the statement, the Akwesasne council said it is trying to replace the tobacco economy, which has kept the community from falling into abject poverty, with other types of economic development. The Mohawks own “nearly a hundred miles of islands” in the St. Lawrence River and are looking to develop cottage and tourism industries.“Harsher sentences and more police are not the solution to a larger economic issue,” said the statement from the Akwesasne Mohawk Council. “Minister Toews seems to be bent on becoming a poster child of Idle No More with his John Wayne attitude towards First Nations people.”First Nations people introduced Europeans to tobacco and the plant is used in sacred ceremonies. Many Mohawks see the tobacco trade as a right and do not recognize international boundaries imposed by nations they view as foreign.last_img

Elsipogtog regroups as chief ponders new antifracking leadership

first_img(Route 134 was again reduced to one lane Monday evening. APTN/Photo)By Jorge Barrera APTN National News ELSIPOGTOG FIRST NATION–The Mi’kmaq-led opposition to shale gas exploration in New Brunswick continued to regroup Monday, moving into a new phase which could also bring new leadership to the ongoing struggle.The movement was buoyed Monday afternoon after a Court of Queen’s Bench judge ruled against a Houston-based energy company that was seeking an indefinite injunction against an encampment along Route 134 in Rexton, NB.The judge said the injunction was no longer needed because trucks belonging to SWN Resources Canada had been freed following an RCMP raid on the encampment Thursday.The encampment had been blocking the company’s trucks in a compound. The RCMP acted last Thursday, one day before an interim injunction was set to expire, sweeping onto the site with dogs and camouflaged tactical units, arresting 40 people and seizing three rifles, ammunition and crude explosive devices.At a press conference Monday morning, Elsipogtog Chief Aaron Sock said he is planning on appointing new leadership for the band’s role in the shale gas exploration opposition. Elsipogotog has been at the heart of the protest movement which has been raging since the summer.“I have three people in mind right now, but we have yet to sit down and discuss,” said Sock. “I do have a spiritual advisor that I turn to and he will be part of the process.”While Sock wouldn’t give details about the “logistics” of the next phase, it has emerged that there are discussions underway to move the encampment from its current location on Route 134 to a previous base within Elsipogtog’s territory used this past summer which sits just off Hwy 116.“We are planning on going to the 116 where the sacred fire was before and do our healing there and get ready for the next round,” said Elsipogtog’s War Chief John Levi.Levi is not connected to the Mi’kmaq Warrior Society.Levi said there is no longer any point to the Route 134 encampment after the raid freed the exploration trucks it was blocking.“There is no sense to being on the side of the road, it’s only a danger for our people,” said Levi.Levi was in talks with the RCMP to remove the burned-out remains of several RCMP vehicles that were torched in the aftermath of Thursday’s raid. He wanted the RCMP to ground their surveillance plane, which had been circling the community, before releasing the vehicles.On Sunday night, Sock and three friends removed the charred remains using three shovels, a half-ton truck and a local towing company. Sock said an RCMP sergeant was also involved in the removal.“I took it on my own personally, just being a good neighbour to the people of Rexton, NB.,” said Sock.The RCMP plane, which had been circling the area relentlessly, returned Monday.The Mi’kmaq Warrior Society was essentially in charge of the camp at the time of the raid. It remained unclear what role the society will play once new leadership is appointed.Mi’kmaq Warrior War Chief “Seven,” who was arrested during the raid but has since been freed, said he had no comment and would wait to hear more information.The Warrior Society has widespread support within Elsipogtog. Several of their key players remained in jail awaiting bail hearings scheduled for Tuesday and Wednesday.Some at the site said they do not want to move the encampment from Route 134.Louis Jerome, from Gesgapegiag First Nation in Quebec, said the current encampment is better strategically because it sits near Hwy 11 which passes over Route 134. The encampment is about 15 kilometres northeast of Elsipogtog and 80 km north of Moncton.Over 100 Mi’kmaq and supporters blocked Hwy 11 for about an hour Saturday. Hwy 11 is one of the main highways in the province, running from Moncton north to Bathurst.“We are going to stay here,” said Jerome. “This is a place where we can battle…We can see traffic, what is going through.”Jerome said the plan is to move the encampment a few metres east from the current site to a field on an adjacent road where a teepee currently sits.Route 134 was again reduced to one lane by the Mi’kmaq Monday evening.Others said it didn’t matter where the camp was, as long as people were unified. Hubert Francis, from Elsipogtog, said confusion abounded following the raid.“I am hearing three or four different stories, from three or four different sources,” said Francis. “From day one there has been a lot of miscommunication…We really don’t have a direction on where we are going with this.”While Sock and the grassroots continue to sort out next steps on the ground, the Elsipogtog chief also has to prepare to continue talks with the provincial government.“I don’t think this is any longer between Elsipogtog and SWN. This is between Elsipogtog and the province,” said Sock. “That is where the battle is.”Sock met with New Brunswick Premier David Alward Friday and, while the two had been making progress before the raid, Thursday’s events changed the landscape.“When you have two opposing ideas, you just butt heads,” said Sock. “Right now we just don’t see eye to eye.”Sock said Elsipogtog doesn’t want shale gas exploration while the province sees it as a “money maker.” The chief said the Mi’kmaq see no benefit to the province developing shale gas deposits through fracking, or hydraulic fracturing.“We don’t want to be the ones at the end of the day, 50 or 60 years down the road, which is the average life span of a shale gas well, to be stuck with thousands of wells,” said Sock. “The province will have made their money and we are stuck with the refuse, the garbage.”jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img

Deleting Highway of Tears emails a slap in the face to families

first_imgAPTN National NewsA report by the British Columbia privacy commissioner shows that senior government officials were deleting emails about the Highway of Tears.That has a coalition of missing and murdered women groups demanding accountability.APTN’s Tina House has the story.last_img

Nunavut MP Hunter Tootoo named Fisheries and Oceans minister

first_imgAPTN National NewsOTTAWA – Hunter Tootoo, the former Nunavut speaker of the legislator, was named minister of Fisheries, Oceans and Canadian Coast Guard, ensuring an Inuk will again sit in the federal cabinet Wednesday.Tootoo is the second Inuk MP to hold a cabinet position – he beat out former MP Leona Aglukkaq who held several cabinet positions under the former Stephen Harper government.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his cabinet were sworn in Wednesday morning at Rideau Hall that included throat singing by two Inuk girls from Ottawa.The #SwearingIn of PM @JustinTrudeau is highlighted with throat singing by two #Ottawa Inuit girls. #PM23 pic.twitter.com/wkxUXtwzKv— OSGG / BSGG (@RideauHall) November 4, 2015There was speculation that Tootoo would be named to Trudeau’s cabinet prior to Wednesday.Many people took to social media to congratulate Tootoo, who is related to NHL hockey player Jordin Tootoo.Congrats @HunterTootoo new Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and Canadian Coast Guard #cdnpoli #nupoli— ITK (@ITK_CanadaInuit) November 4, 2015Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami President Natan Obed attended the swearing-in ceremony and said in an interview with APTN National News “it is a proud day for Inuit” and that he spoke to Tootoo shortly after he was sworn in as a minister.“This is a portfolio he holds that is quite near and dear to the hearts of the Inuit,” said Natan, adding he’ll be meeting formally with Tootoo soon. “He knows formal meetings are coming and there will be very difficult things (language and suicide prevention) I’ll be asking of him and I think he is ready for that.”The ITK is the national Inuit organization that represents nearly 60,000 Inuit.Other Aboriginal leaders like Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde also congratulated Tootoo and Sheila North Wilson, grand chief of Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak who tweeted:Very happy/hopeful that we now have an Indigenous Fisheries and Oceans Minister. Congratulations Hunter Tootoo— Sheila North Wilson (@shenorthwilson) November 4, 2015Others included former APTN National News reporter Ossie Michelin.HUNTER TOOTOO is the DFO Minster! We have an Inuk in charge of Fisheries and Oceans! And the Coast Guard too! #CantEven!— Ossie Michelin (@Osmich) November 4, 2015last_img

Activists call for more money to fight AIDS

first_imgAPTN National NewsAIDS activists across the country are calling on the federal government to invest more in new drugs and treatments for HIV/AIDs.APTN’s Chris Stewart reports.cstewart@aptn.calast_img

Poison from former Yellowknife gold mine has spread to surrounding lakes report

first_imgIman Kassam APTN National NewsChemicals from a former gold mine long closed has spread to a number of surrounding lakes according to a new report by researchers at the University of Ottawa.Contaminants, including arsenic trioxide, left behind from the Giant mine that closed in 2004 has spread and is a threat to animals and humans.ikassam@aptn.calast_img

Montréal rallies around shelter to try and keep its doors open

first_imgTom Fennario APTN National NewsPeople in Montréal are rallying behind a day shelter that serves many of the city’s Indigenous homeless.The shelter Open Door must find a new home, or close.tfennario@aptn.calast_img

After decades of living without Samson Cree Nation one step closer to

first_imgChris StewartAPTN NewsUnlike tens of millions of other Canadians, members of the Samson Cree Nation never enjoyed reliable, fresh drinking water.But that soon may come to an end.The community broke ground on a $32.5 million upgrade to its wastewater facility.cstewart@aptn.ca@aptnchrislast_img

Crash south of Edmonton claims 5 including 3 sisters

first_imgAPTN NewsThe chief of an Alberta First Nation called on the power of prayer to help his community heal from another fatal car crash.“Our community came together last time and our communities are going to come together this time,” said Vernon Saddleback of Samson Cree, south of Edmonton.Saddleback confirmed five people who died Tuesday had ties to Samson and Ermineskin – two of four first nations that comprise the Maskwacis region, about 95 kilometres south of Edmonton.However, the victims were living in the nearby town of Wetaskiwin.Three sisters from one family and a couple with a young son were killed when two vehicles collided outside Millet,  Alta., at about 4:15 pm MT June 5. They were all in the same vehicle.A person in the other vehicle was treated for minor injuries and released.Police have not yet spoken about the accident.“I do want to ask everyone out there who is watching, who is listening or who is going to read this, if you could pray for our communities,” Saddleback told reporters Wednesday.“And pray for those families involved.”Chief Vernon Saddleback speaks to reporters.The three sisters were Dominique Soosay Northwest, 19; Cheyanne Soosay Northwest, 22; and Latesha Soosay Northwest, 25; from Samson Cree First Nation.Cheyanne and Latesha had five children between them.Wetaskiwin RCMP said Wednesday they were still investigating the cause of the crash that also claimed the lives of Anthony Swampy, 30, and his girlfriend, Terrelle Minde – whose age was not available.Saddleback expressed shock at the heavy loss.“Tough to lose one family member but five from a community… words can’t express,” he said at a news conference.Police said the collision occurred on Highway 2A at Township Road 472, about five kilometres south of the town of Millet.last_img

Cree teens court fight for braces leads to noninsured health benefits policy

first_img(An x-ray of Josey Willier’s teeth which her doctor said needed braces to alleviate chronic teeth and jaw pain.)Editor’s Note: In the story about Josey Willier’s braces, APTN News reported that her braces cost $8,000. APTN was contacted by the office of Jane Philpott, minister of Indigenous Services to say that the braces, originally paid for by the family, only cost $6,000. The federal government did spend $100,000 in legal fees arguing in court that the braces should not be covered under the non-insured health benefits program.Melissa RidgenAPTN NewsIt was a three-year court battle of David versus Goliath proportions and the victory will have rippling effects for other kids covered by Health Canada’s Non-Insured Health Benefits program.Josey Willier, from Sucker Creek First Nation in Alberta, was just 13 when she suffered crippling chronic pain from the position of her teeth and jaw.Her physician said braces were medically necessary but government doctors – who never examined the girl – denied they were needed.So  NIHB refused to cover the $8,000 treatment.The family took the government to court and rather than paying for the braces, the federal government spent $100,000 arguing why Canada should not pay.The case was settled this week.“We’ve been working with them steadily over the last few months to reach an agreement,” said Josey’s mother Stacey Shiner.“My mindset was I wouldn’t settle until they changed their policy so this doesn’t happen to other children.”The deal, terms of which weren’t disclosed, came at the 11th hour this week, just ahead of when the Federal Court of Appeal was to decide on the matter.“This is a huge step forward,” said Shiner. “It used to be a checked-box scenario of what was required but it leaves so many grey areas. Pain and discomfort are now factors.”A statement released by the family mentioned Cindy Blackstock, executive director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society, who was an ally during the court battle.Blackstock said her agency will be watching to ensure the new orthodontic policy complies with the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal orders on Jordan’s Principle.According to a statement released by Jane Philpott, minister of Indigenous Services, the department will be updating its non-insured health benefits by June 15 to include more health services for First Nation and Inuit children.“I am pleased a settlement agreement has been reached relating to orthodontic coverage under the Non-Insured Health Benefits (NIHB) program,” said Philpott in the statement released Tuesday evening.“I am confident that the services Indigenous Services Canada provides are contributing to better oral health outcomes for First Nations and Inuit. The orthodontic coverage under the Non-Insured Health Benefits Program is comprehensive and based on clinical evidence.”During the court fight, Josey’s parents paid out of pocket for the braces. She’s had them off now for about a year.mridgen@aptn.ca@aptnnewslast_img

Aecon Group receives approval to rejoin Gordie Howe bridge consortium

first_imgTORONTO – Aecon Group Inc. says it has received approval to rejoin the group selected as the preferred proponent to build and operate the Gordie Howe International Bridge.Aecon’s request to rejoin its partners as part of the Bridging North America team was approved following a review by the Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority, the Crown corporation responsible for the project.The consortium, which also includes ACS Infrastructure Canada Inc., Dragados Canada Inc. and Fluor Canada, was selected as the preferred proponent for the project in July.Aecon was initially part of the group but pulled out in May as it was undergoing a federal review about a proposed takeover by a Chinese state-owned company that was ultimately blocked by the Canadian government.Before the takeover by China Communications Construction Company was rejected, the federal government had reportedly decided that Aecon couldn’t work on the bridge for security reasons and opposition from the U.S. administration.The group’s plan for the bridge calls for a six-lane, 2.5-kilometre cable-stayed design. The cost, design details and expected construction schedule are expected to be announced once the contract has been awarded and signed in September.Companies in this story: (TSX:ARE)last_img

New Flyer awarded contract for 40 electric buses from Montreal and Laval

first_imgWINNIPEG – North America’s largest transit bus and motor coach manufacturer says the transit commissions of Montreal and Laval, Que., have placed Canada’s largest order for battery-electric buses.New Flyer Canada, a subsidiary of NFI Group Inc., says it beat two competitors to win a contract for 40 zero-emission Xcelsior Charge transit buses from the transit agencies in Quebec’s two largest cities.A notice to build the buses is expected after a nine-month review of a pilot bus slated to be given the green light Oct. 31.The order for 30 buses from Montreal’s transit authority (STM) and 10 from Laval’s transit agency is supported by funding from the provincial and federal governments.Both transit authorities operate battery-electric bus pilot programs as they aim to become fully electric in the future.The Winnipeg-based company says these buses are already operating in Toronto, Vancouver and several large American cities.Companies in this story: (TSX:NFI)last_img

Journalist group says years 94 killings end recent decline

first_imgBRUSSELS — An international trade association says killings of journalists and news media staff rose again in 2018 following an overall decline during the past half- dozen years.The International Federation of Journalists said in an annual report set for release on Monday that the number of media industry workers slain around the world rose to 94, 12 more than in 2017.Before the now-ended downward trend, the news industry saw 121 staff killings in 2012 and as many as 155 in 2006.The deadliest country for people who work in the news media this year was Afghanistan, where 16 of the killings occurred. Mexico was next, with 11. Yemen had nine media slayings and Syria eight in 2018.The Associated Presslast_img

Man running from Alaska to Florida passing through Fort St John this

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Run Pete Run! A man who has made it his goal to run from Alaska to Florida will be making his way through the Energetic City this Saturday.American born Peter Kostelnick is in the 30th day of his historically long journey. The man is running 65-110 kilometres per day and hopes to reach Key West, Florida by early November.Kostelnick, who was in Pink Mountain this morning, will be one of the first ever to run the entirety of the Alaska Highway. Two years ago Kostelnick broke the world record for running across America in just 42 days, six hours and 30 minutes, beating the previous record by four whole days. He has also won the Badwater 135 twice, a race regarded as the “toughest footrace on the planet.” Kostelnick’s current run is completely self-supported which means he is pushing a stroller with his gear and food. He also enjoys company so residents are encouraged to join his run as he passes through Fort St. John.Residents can track Kostelnick’s location via his Strava on petesfeetaa.com. Anyone interested in learning more on his journey can click here.last_img