Steenbergen appointed chief financial officer at Lufthansa | News

first_img“With Remco Steenbergen, we will have a distinguished financial expert with extensive experience in the capital markets joining us as the new Lufthansa Group chief financial officer,” said Karl-Ludwig Kley, chairman of the Deutsche Lufthansa AG supervisory board. “Remco Steenbergen brings with him excellent financial expertise from various companies as well as industries and has also impressed the supervisory board with his personality. “Especially now, when the pandemic is having such serious consequences for air travel, an internationally experienced and well-respected chief financial officer is more important than ever for Lufthansa Group: not only to overcome the current crisis but also for the coming years, when we have to – and want to – pay back government stabilisation funds.”- Advertisement – After the resignations of Ulrik Svensson and Thorsten Dirks, Carsten Spohr, chairman of the executive board of Deutsche Lufthansa AG, took over the responsibilities of the chief financial officer on an interim basis. With the appointment of Steenbergen, the finance division will be re-established. It will include controlling and risk management, corporate finance, accounting and balance sheets, taxes, and purchasing, as well as mergers and acquisitions.- Advertisement – Most recently, Steenbergen was chief financial officer of Barry Callebaut Group based in Zurich, Switzerland and prior to that, worked at Philips and at KPMG. Throughout his career, he has held a wide range of global leadership and financial management roles at numerous companies in the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Taiwan, Belgium, Ireland, the United States and Switzerland. Lufthansa has appointed Remco Steenbergen to the role of chief financial officer. Taking up the position at the start of January, Steenbergen will also take a seat on the executive board.- Advertisement –center_img OlderHeathrow again calls for testing regime as passenger numbers collapse – Advertisement –last_img read more

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie voted best Women’s Prize for Fiction winner

first_imgChimamanda Ngozi Adichie: ‘We all breathe misogyny’ play- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img

Other precautions useful as vaccine distribution will take time

first_imgHis comments came one day after biotech company Moderna announced that trials show its vaccine is more than 94% effective in preventing Covid-19. Pfizer last week said its vaccine is more than 90% effective.Wong, who is also the country’s education minister, said the developments were positive, but there’s still “a long way to go” before the safety and efficacy of the vaccines are ensured. They will then need to be distributed and it will take time for a sufficient number of people to be vaccinated, he added. We really need all of these to come together – vaccines, testing, safe distancing, contact tracing.- Advertisement – People wearing face masks as a precaution walking along Orchard Road, a famous shopping district in Singapore.Maverick Asio | SOPA Images | LightRocket | Getty Images Lawrence WongSingapore’s minister for education Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests are currently considered the most accurate in detecting coronavirus infections, but can take a long time to return results.“Developing new rapid tests that are cheaper, simpler, easier to administer, that’s very important to ensure more comprehensive testing,” said Wong.He added that simple precautions such as wearing masks, keeping social gatherings small and maintaining safe distances are “highly effective” in keeping the infection under control.“We really need all of these to come together – vaccines, testing, safe distancing, contact tracing,” he said.Third phase of reopeningAsked when Singapore would enter the third stage of its reopening, the minister said the conditions have to be right.“This is like … a fire that has just been put out. The embers are still around, and it only takes a small spark to get the fire raging again,” he said. SINGAPORE – A coronavirus vaccine won’t be the silver bullet to end the pandemic, the co-chair of Singapore’s Covid-19 task force said this week despite “promising” news from pharmaceutical companies.“We’re certainly encouraged by it, it’s very promising, but I would say also that the vaccine is not a silver bullet to end the pandemic,” Lawrence Wong told “Squawk Box Asia” on Tuesday. “We should not put all our eggs into the vaccine basket.”- Advertisement – Singapore went into a partial lockdown in April and has reopened its economy in phases since June. Phase two started in mid-June.“When can we get to phase three? I’ve emphasized this, that it’s not about rushing into phase three, but making sure that we do it right,” Wong said.Singapore is likely to allow bigger social gatherings and increase capacity limits for public venues such as museums in the next step of reopening.The minister outlined three factors that need to be in place and where the country stands:Effective testing capabilities“On testing metrics, we are doing quite well,” Wong said. The country has reached its target capacity of 40,000 tests a day and is continuing to deploy both PCR tests and rapid antigen tests.Continued vigilance in the community “For the large part, I think we’re doing well,” the minister said, noting that there are occasional cases of people breaching the rules. He added that this is an ongoing measure of Singapore’s “continued cooperation and compliance.”Contact tracing abilitiesAround 50% of the population has downloaded the TraceTogether app or is using a token that allows Singapore to identify people who have been in close contact with confirmed coronavirus cases. “We aim to get that to around 70% or higher, and we think we can get there by the end of the year,” Wong said. “Perhaps it will take a bit longer, but that’s the current timeframe that we’re working on.”“We will do our darndest to go through phase 3, resume activities progressively without having to enter into another circuit breaker or lockdown,” he said. “I don’t think anyone wants to go through that again.” “We should not look only at vaccines,” he said. “We really need all the tools at our disposal, and that includes testing – having more effective ways of testing beyond the ‘gold standard’ of the PCR test.”- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

WHO group to tackle H5N1 virus-sharing dispute

first_imgNov 19, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – A World Health Organization (WHO) working group will meet in Geneva over the next 4 days to try to solve an impasse over how countries share their H5N1 avian influenza virus samples, a disagreement that pits developing countries’ demand for affordable vaccines against the global need to monitor virus changes and develop pandemic vaccines.The rift over sharing of H5N1 samples began last December when Indonesia stopped sending H5N1 isolates to the WHO as a protest against the cost of commercial vaccines developed from the strains. Indonesia has said it owns the H5N1 samples found on its soil and intends to use them to develop a vaccine to protect its own population.In May Indonesia promised to resume sending H5N1 virus samples, but it has sent only a few. The government sent three samples in May, but they did not contain any live viruses, according to previous reports. Gregory Hartl, a WHO spokesman, recently told CIDRAP News that the last samples Indonesia sent were from patients from Bali in August.Other countries, such as China and Vietnam, have been slow to share H5N1 samples or have encountered procedural difficulties in sending them out. However, Chinese agriculture official Niu Dun said the country recently sent 23 H5N1 samples to the WHO, according to a Nov 13 report from Xinhua, China’s state news agency.At the Geneva meeting, members of the WHO’s working group on virus-sharing will continue work on resolutions to ensure equitable H5N1 vaccine access that were outlined in May at the World Health Assembly, the annual meeting of WHO member countries. In August the same group, composed of representatives from 23 nations, met in Singapore, where they produced three documents—two that address H5N1 sample sharing and handling and one on a virus-sharing oversight mechanism, according to a previous CIDRAP News report.David Heymann, the WHO’s assistant director-general for communicable diseases, said in the earlier report that at the November meeting the group would finalize the documents, review and debate other issues, and forward a report to the WHO executive board. The documents and other agenda items are available on the working group’s Web site.Several news developments and publications relating to the virus-sharing issue have cropped up in the past few weeks in advance of the WHO meeting.Indonesia asks the WHO to return samplesIndonesia asked the WHO to return 58 of its H5N1 samples, according to a Nov 9 article in the Jakarta Post. Health minister Siti Fadilah Supari said Indonesia needed the virus samples back because it did not have a stockpile of seed viruses needed to develop its own vaccines, the report said. Supari claimed that international regulations require source countries to give up all their samples.Supari said Indonesia asked the WHO to return the viruses in August, but had not received a response, the Post report said. “We keep asking (the WHO) to return the samples because they belong to us. This is for the sake of our country’s sovereignty,” she told the newspaper.However, Hartl told CIDRAP News that the WHO responded to a letter from Supari, but he gave no details on the response.Organization emerges as Indonesia’s adviserMeanwhile, the Canadian Press revealed yesterday that the Third World Network (TWN), a nongovernmental organization that does advocacy work for developing countries, has been advising Indonesia in its dispute with the WHO over the H5N1 samples.The organization, based in Malaysia, issued a statement on Nov 15 charging that H5N1 viruses have been shared outside the WHO network with vaccine developers without the permission of the source countries, which it says violates WHO guidance issued in 2005.”As a result, several developing countries have slowed the sharing of viruses,” the TWN said.The statement urges developing countries to sign a document that it will present at the WHO intergovernmental meeting this week. The document claims that a “WHO designated laboratory,” along with other companies and institutions, is seeking patents on viruses, parts of viruses, and products, such as vaccines, made from the H5N1 viruses countries have shared.”These companies and institutions see this as an occasion to obtain patents and extra profits, and there has been a rapid increase in patenting activity related to avian influenza,” the TWN document states.The statement urges the WHO working group to establish an equitable “framework” for distributing vaccines, diagnostics, and other medical products in the event of a pandemic. It says the framework should recognize nations’ “sovereignty” over biological resources and should obligate developed countries and the private sector to share H5N1-related technology with developing countries and provide resources to build local capacities for producing vaccine and other pandemic-related medical supplies.Are viruses really biological resources?David Fidler, an international law professor at Indiana University in Bloomington, wrote about some of the legal aspects of the virus-sharing issue in the January early online issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.Fidler wrote that Indonesia has asserted that pathogenic virus samples are covered by the Convention on Biological Diversity, an international treaty adopted in 1992 to guide national strategies for conserving biological diversity. However, influenza viruses aren’t the kind of biological resource that the convention was meant to protect, he maintained.”These viruses invaded Indonesia; their presence and spread owes nothing to the investment, nurturing, and utilization of the Indonesian government or people,” Fidler wrote. “Rather than seeking to conserve this virus, the strategy is to contain and ultimately eradicate it.”Indonesia’s virus-sharing protest has exposed ambiguity in the 2005 International Health Regulations, which took effect in July, he wrote. Though the new regulations don’t specifically require member countries to share samples of biological materials, they recognize a country’s duty to share samples for surveillance purposes, Fidler added.Europeans worry about fallout In a briefing released in advance of the WHO meeting, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) said the focus on the virus-sharing issue could be taking a serious toll on the global health community.Though the issues are fundamentally important to the global health community, “a lack of resolution could deflect many key staff from other important work, such as improving global pandemic preparedness,” the ECDC said.The current virus-sharing system, though not perfect, has worked extremely well over the past several years, particularly during the SARS crisis, the ECDC said. “Care needs to be taken to ensure that further regulation does not compromise function,” the report says, adding that a requirement for material transfer agreements or permission from source countries could seriously delay the development of new vaccines.See also:WHO intergovernmental meeting on pandemic influenza preparedness Web sitehttp://www.who.int/gb/pip/Aug 9 CIDRAP News story “WHO: Indonesia’s withholding of viruses endangers world”Third World Network Web sitehttp://www.twnside.org.sg/Nov 15 TWN statement on virus-sharingFidler DP. Influenza virus samples, international law, and global health diplomacy. Emerg Infect Dis 2008 Jan;14(1) [Full text]Oct 17 CIDRAP News story “WHO report explores patent issues concerning flu viruses”last_img read more

Another antibody against diverse flu strains found

first_imgFeb 27, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – For the second time this week, scientists have reported the discovery of a human antibody that, at least in theory, could lead to development of a vaccine or drug effective against most types of influenza A, including the deadly H5N1 avian flu virus.A team from the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., and the Dutch company Crucell Holland BV describe the new antibody, called CR6261, in a report in Science. They write that the antibody recognizes a stable, or nonmutating, region of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein in the 1918 pandemic flu virus and a 2004 strain of the H5N1 virus.As it is described, the antibody targets the same general region of the HA protein as do the monoclonal antibodies described in the report published Feb 22: the stem or neck of the molecule, which sits on the surface of the virus and helps it bind to host cells. And like the earlier report, the new one says the antibody neutralizes the virus by blocking it from fusing with cells.”The antibody neutralizes the virus by blocking conformational rearrangements associated with membrane fusion,” the Science report states. “Identification of the CR6261 epitope [the HA site the antibody targets] provides a lead for the design of antivirals and takes a significant step towards the development of a durable and cross-protective ‘universal’ vaccine against influenza A,” it concludes.The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which provided funding for both studies released this week, said in a statement yesterday, “Taken together, these studies provide a blueprint for efforts to develop new antiviral drugs as well as a potential universal flu vaccine.”The scientists, with Damian C. Ekiert of Scripps as first author, write that they isolated CR6261 from a healthy, vaccinated person by mixing a serum sample with HA from an H5 virus. In a previously reported study, they found that CR6261 neutralized several influenza A subtypes, including H1, H2, H5, H6, H8, and H9. They also found that it protected mice from H1N1 and H5N1 viruses when administered up to 5 days after infection.To determine which part of the HA molecule the antibody targets and how it neutralizes the virus, the team studied the crystal structures of the antibody in combination with HAs from the 1918 H1N1 virus and a 2004 Vietnam strain of the H5N1 virus. They found that the antibody attaches to the base of the proteins rather than to the mushroom-shaped head—the portion targeted by existing flu vaccines.In further experiments, the scientists concluded that the antibody prevents HA from initiating the process of fusing the viral membrane with the host cell membrane. “CR6261 appears to neutralize the virus by stabilizing the pre-fusion state and preventing the pH-dependent fusion of viral and cellular membranes,” the report says.The researchers also analyzed more than 5,000 HA genetic sequences in a flu database in an effort to learn why certain flu subtypes, such as H3 and H7, are not neutralized by CR6261. They concluded that the masking of a certain site on the HA molecule by glycoproteins (glycosylation) is the probable reason. From this analysis, they concluded that the antibody probably can neutralize HAs from 12 of the 16 influenza A subtypes: H1, H2, H4-H6, H8, H9, H11-H14, and H16.The presence of the CR6261 epitope in a wide range of influenza viruses “suggests a critical role in membrane fusion,” indicating the possibility of using it to develop new antiviral drugs and a broadly protective vaccine, the researchers write.Experts who were not involved in the study said the latest findings are very similar to those reported earlier this week in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology.John Treanor, MD, a vaccine researcher and professor of microbiology and immunology at the University of Rochester in New York, called the idea of using the “fusion region” of HA to develop a vaccine interesting, though not entirely new. “It’s a long way to go between knowing you have an antibody that can recognize that region and making a vaccine,” he said.If the CR6261 target region were used to make a vaccine designed to induce the immune system to generate similar antibodies, immunogenicity could be a challenge, Treanor said. “Bear in mind that you don’t really make this antibody when you’re exposed [to flu viruses], or you don’t make much of it. So presumably you’d have to cook up some way of presenting the epitope in such a way as to make it immunogenic.”He said the findings certainly raise the possibility making CR6261 antibodies for use as a flu treatment. “I don’t have any doubt that we could do that. I will say that if the experience with palivizumab is any guide, you’d expect this type of passive antibody approach to be much more effective for prevention than for treatment.”Palivizumab is a human monoclonal antibody used to protect certain vulnerable children from serious infections with respiratory syncytial virus, he said.Dr. Richard Webby, a virologist, flu researcher, and associate member of the Department of Infectious Diseases at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, called the latest findings “great stuff.”Given that monoclonal antibodies are already used to treat certain diseases, the findings certainly point to a possibility of antibody-based therapies for flu, he said.”There are some limitations on the wider use of this approach, cost being the major one,” he said. “As production techniques improve and costs come down, it becomes a little bit more viable.”Webby added that antibody-based flu therapies have been “very, very effective” in animal models, surpassing other drugs. “So I absolutely think it’s an avenue that needs to be pursued aggressively.”As for the vaccine possibilities, he noted that a number of researchers are trying to make vaccines that induce immunity to more stable parts of influenza viruses, including sites on the HA, and have had mixed success. “There’s no doubt that if we want to produce a more cross-reactive vaccine against influenza, we have to understand more about these cross-reactive epitopes,” he said.Ekiert DC, Bhabba G, Elsliger, MA, et al. Antibody recognition of a highly conserved influenza virus epitope. Science 2009 Feb 26 (early online publication) [Abstract]See also: Feb 26 NIAID statementhttp://www.niaid.nih.gov/news/newsreleases/2009/Pages/flu_universal.aspxFeb 23 CIDRAP News story “Researchers find antibody that fights H5N1, seasonal flu strains”last_img read more

What color are the cows: Brown or purple?

first_imgIf we did a survey among children both in Croatia and in other countries, and asked them the title question, it would be interesting to see the answers and which cow would prevail. Unfortunately, I’m more inclined to think that purple would predominate among the answers.In today’s modern times, people are increasingly separating from nature, human contact, direct communication and the real world, and everything is becoming digital, ie we live in a digital world. Returning to nature and experience without technology is one of the new trends in the world of tourism, as well as the consumption of organic, ecological and authentic dishes, living as locals, ie experiencing an authentic experience. That is why the very essence of tourism is precisely authenticity, and this is precisely our greatest tourist strength in the fight against globalization, because everything is becoming the same, standardized. And when that is the case, then you lose the motive of coming and the competitive advantage.Also, due to globalization and digitalization, people are increasingly living in modern cities, and the modern way of life and business is giving less and less space, ie time for themselves, family, children. Because of all this, today’s children have never seen a live cow, chicken, horse, goose… and do not know what they actually look like. Their perception is created by cartoons, marketing (Milka) and the digital world.If you live in Zagreb, Split, Rijeka and other major cities, ask yourself: When was the last time you saw a cow? When did your children see pets? Ask your child what color is a cow? How many eggs does a hen lay per day? Or maybe eggs are made in retail chains? In accordance with the above, I wonder if the “Zoo” of domestic animals can be a great tourist product? I’m sure he can, and here’s a concrete example.In the Nature Park near Sutivan on the island of Brač, children enjoy and get to know the animals.When Stipo Jurić and his wife Ana decided to turn the island karst into a nature park (private zoo) two kilometers from Sutivan on the island of Brač 14 years ago, he planned to build several dwellings with backyards where his children could see animals they usually know only from books. or television commercials and make sure the cow is not purple and the eggs are not laying in the mall.But today, in addition to sports fields, there is a 20 and 50-meter cable car, slides, trampoline, swing, wooden castle and restaurant with local food and animals rich zoo, all of which covers 16 thousand square meters of Sutivan Nature Park. And most importantly, a real attraction for all foreign tourists who come to the island of Brac. The most interesting, especially for children is the zoo where long-tailed blue and white peacocks, golden, silver and hunting pheasants, geese, ducks, domestic chickens live together, there is the African ostrich, Vietnamese pigs, wild boars, cows, sheep, goats and mouflon and other domestic animals. Stipo Jurić says that the jewel of the park are donkeys aged from a few days to a few years, and horses Suzi and Bela on which you can ride, and the environment is beautified by fruits, greenery and flowers.Love and care for wildlife is felt at every step of this nature park and visitors are sure to bring with them emotions that will remain in their lasting memory because the holiday is not only the sea and sun but also popcorn looking for corn and grass grazing cows. They don’t accidentally call Stipe’s property “Brač’s paradise for children”. “Once an elementary school teacher brought the children and spent among the hens so one student asked how many hens lay eggs a day. She said a dozen, and maybe only one a day… Well, sometimes we even laugh”, Stipo tells me.One hen lays one egg a year?By the way, to answer the question of how many hens lay eggs per day, once a day, ie an average of 280 eggs per year. And now imagine that in our tourism we use domestic eggs, not from large production plants, but from local family farms. How much does one large hotel consume eggs per day, and how much just one whole destination for tourism? Imagine how many eggs it is per day and how many people would be employed through hundreds of family farms, just in the production of organic and organic eggs? It is a tourism to strive for and then tourism makes sense, not to live off the rent of accommodation and the sun and the sea.Not to mention, how organic and organic products have a much higher price on the market, how all the trends are in this direction and how there is a great demand for the same, as well as that the cream of homemade eggs are bright yellow, not “white” colors. Just look at the prices of organic products in retail chains, prices are 30-40% more expensive, if some products and much more. And interestingly, there is a market that is growing from year to year.Sutivan Nature Park has become an excellent quality tourist content offered by the island of Brac and there children can see and experience animals in the true sense, not just watch them because they are given the opportunity to touch, feed and groom animals. Also, in addition to all this, children get all the information about how animals live, what they eat, how they behave, etc.…And this is where the greatest magic happens, it is this direct contact and interaction between children and animals that is invaluable and an experience that is not forgotten. It is remembered “for a lifetime”. “Love for my late wife Ana keeps me from doing what we started together and because of her I do it and I will never leave the park – I live for all this…”, Says Stipo Jurić.This is exactly what is felt at every step, this is not a commercial park, everything is local and you feel that personal touch and care for the whole park. This is not a job, this is a way of life, says Barba Stipo. He adds that all the animals were registered with the Croatian Livestock Association, and the veterinary inspection was there several times. “One inspector acted very seriously and talked a little, so I was afraid she would find any mistake. She also looked at the wild boars that had just pollinated and saw where they were housed because the cubs require special care. She did not say anything, but she wrote in the minutes that the animals live in extremely good conditions, are housed in a house with a garden and are all tame, which is a sign that they were cared for with a lot of attention and love, “said Stipo Juric. where wild boars have young, is the best proof that the living conditions of the animals are excellent. By the way, all animals are registered in the Croatian Livestock Association.Guests find out about his nature park via the internet, there is their promotional material in the local tourist board and many who come once, come again. “My marketing is satisfied visitors, because those who come all these years, return every year and so they recommend others to visit us,” says Barba Stipo and although he does not count exactly all visitors, he estimates that this Brac paradise was visited by over 10 visitors.The nature park near Sutivan is not difficult to find – from the direction of Supetar you have to pass the main entrance to Sutivan and after a slight uphill there is a signpost that will direct the traveler to the park, and from the direction of Milna there is a sign the park is 500 meters.Finally, let me share an anecdote.Namely, while I was talking to Barba Stipe, my son came up to me, got into the conversation and told me. ” Dad, Dad has another parrot, come see and he pulls me to show me another parrot he found. You know, Dad, there’s a red parrot. Come see“Says my son David.That says it all and of course how even after a year, my son still remembers the animals from Brač. A story that has been told dozens of times, a story that is not forgotten, a story that spreads further and a story that remains in the memory of “the whole” life. I am grateful that Barba Stipo provided me with unforgettable experiences from my vacation.Yes, a “zoo” with domestic and indigenous animals can and is a great tourist product, so I wonder why we don’t have them anymore. It is an experience, an emotion and a story. It is tourism.last_img read more

Dispute between the City of Dubrovnik and Excelsa nekretnina resolved: The Dubrovnik cable car starts operating

first_imgAlthough ATMs are located in private premises, the fact is that they disturb the views of the historic core and the UNESCO protected site, and thus disturb the view of the same. “These are significant funds for the City of Dubrovnik that we will spend on improving the infrastructure, starting from the sports one onwards”, Said the Mayor of the City of Dubrovnik, Mato Franković, adding that the City of Dubrovnik will earn around 10 million kuna annually from the concession fee. This decision was made due to pressure and protests from the citizens of Dubrovnik, who expressed their dissatisfaction due to “ATMophobia” in the old town. They placed flowers in front of ATMs in protest. At yesterday’s 23rd session of the City Council, an out-of-court settlement was reached between the City of Dubrovnik and Excelsa nekretnina doo as well as the Decision on granting a concession, thus creating all conditions for the continuation of the popular Dubrovnik cable car. the city of Dubrovnik was closed this year. Certainly, as the Dubrovnik cable car was one of the TOP attractions of all visitors to Dubrovnik, and as its closure caused the most damage to Dubrovnik as a destination. So resolving this dispute is certainly great news for Dubrovnik. ” The fine is 10 thousand kuna per legal entity and two thousand kuna for the responsible person. Penalties will be written every day because the law allows it, so we will see if it suits anyone to receive a 300 thousand kuna fine”Pointed out the Mayor of the City of Dubrovnik, Mato Franković, writes Dubrovnik Diary. ATMs are leaving the old town Certainly a move to praise and finally the introduction of order in Dubrovnik. When we talk about sustainable development, we are certainly talking about the space and identity that we must preserve, which is our most valuable resource. Unfortunately, we are a decade behind, if not more, behind such a mindset, but the example from Dubrovnik is proof that it is still not too late and that we can still save what can be saved. The decision made it forbidden to install ATMs as well as other devices and advertising cabinets, and that the existing ATMs must be removed within 30 days, unless the owner receives the approval of the Conservation Department of the Ministry of Culture. Dubrovnik councilors also adopted amendments to the Decision on Communal Order, which should ring ATMs in the historic center if the owners do not obtain the approval of the conservator. The dispute between the City of Dubrovnik and the company Excelsa nekretnina, which are the owners of the famous Dubrovnik cable car, has finally been resolved. Photo: Pexels.com Thus, the debt from the past will be settled, with which the City of Dubrovnik will be paid HRK 26 million, and from now on the variable part of the concession fee is determined in the amount of 15% of revenues from the sale of cable car tickets, while the concession is granted for 50 year. Cover photo: Dubrovnik Cable Carlast_img read more

A tourist agreement was signed between Lika-Senj County and the Chinese province of Shanxi

first_imgThe Office for Culture and Tourism of Shanxi Province and the Sino-Croatian Association for Cultural and Economic Cooperation organized a conference on tourism cooperation between China and Croatia, with the aim of strengthening tourism cooperation. With this agreement, Lika-Senj County opens tourist cooperation with a very important Chinese province with over 37 million inhabitants, which is certainly a great potential and opportunity for countless tourist cooperation. On that occasion, cooperation agreements were signed, including an agreement on tourist exchange and cooperation between the Chinese province of Shanxi and Lika-Senj County, writes the portal Likaclub.eu. The agreement was signed by the director of the Lika-Senj County Tourist Board, Ivan Radošević, and the leader of the Chinese province of Shanxi. The form is there, and now it’s the most important thing – the content and radical changes in the connection. And not only through tourism, where the Plitvice Lakes National Park is certainly one of the main motives for the arrival of Chinese tourists, but also in the economic field through new investments. Photo: Pixabay.com / Source: Likaclub.eulast_img read more

TZ Splita launched the #TogetherInSplit campaign

first_imgHowever, today the Tourist Board of Split, as the first tourist board in Croatia (at least as far as I know) published a video referring to the time in which we are where tourism has literally stopped. Many tourist boards have directed communication according to time with narrative and messages in the context of staying home, traveling later. “The world has come to a stand still, because that is the only way it can start moving again. But, we are waiting for you and once again we will be”- #TogetherInSplit If you have any other positive examples from Croatia, feel free to let us know at vijesti@hrturizam.hr In Croatia, unfortunately, we do not have some positive examples, let alone creative or different from others, except for the invitation to publish old pictures from the destination. Although more than 30 days have passed since self-isolation or the outbreak of the coronavirus epidemic in Europe, it is never too late to start communicating in line with the current situation. Although we can’t call one video as a complete campaign, we will definitely follow what is in the current communication plan of the #TogetherInSplit campaign. We always have to communicate, especially in a crisis situation.last_img read more

HZJZ: Recommendation for work / stay on yachts, boats and other vessels during the epidemic COVID-19

first_imgPassenger records.  Crew health monitoring by daily temperature measurement.  The Croatian Institute of Public Health published recommendations for work / stay on yachts, boats and other vessels during the COVID-19 epidemic. Other recommendations as well as the procedure in case of symptoms indicative of COVID-19 can be found in the appendix. It is recommended that vessel personnel keep records of passenger contacts and passenger entries and exits, so that in case of detection of a sick person on board, territorially competent epidemiologists can identify and inform the patient’s contacts as soon as possible and implement measures to prevent further spread of infection. Before starting work, all crew members must measure their temperature in the morning and will not start working if it is higher than 37,2oC and / or they have respiratory problems. In case of fever and / or respiratory problems with or without fever, employees will contact the employer and the competent family doctor by phone and will not start working until the cause of respiratory disorders or fever is determined. Attachment: HZJZ: Recommendation for work / stay on yachts, boats and other vessels during the epidemic COVID-19last_img read more