Pandora Goes Curated With Streaming Playlists OnDemand

first_img Pandora Launches Curated Playlists pandora-goes-curated-streaming-playlists-demand Email Facebook Pandora Goes Curated With Streaming Playlists On-Demand Still backed by the sophisticated Music Genome Project, Pandora adds new dimensions of data with “wickedly expert curators”Philip MerrillGRAMMYs Oct 30, 2017 – 4:17 pm Today’s announcement that Pandora Premium launched 250 curated playlists turned heads, in part because their streaming service developed without listeners being able to request specific tunes the way people can on Spotify. When Apple Music launched in 2015 it placed a big emphasis on its hip human curators while Pandora seemed to have staked out the machine-driven side of music recommendations.Pandora’s algorithmic back end depends on the Music Genome Project — a way to turn one track’s musical properties into a set of several hundred descriptive pieces of data. Based on the analytics of each user’s personal preferences, Pandora generates radio-like streaming stations to fit each individual listener. This is still true and has resulted in modern peculiarities like when one spouse prefers their hip new music from Spotify while the other spouse favors country music from Pandora. Although Pandora has led the way, all the major streaming services now hope their personalization-math will make visitors want to return and encourage subscribers to pay.The copyright-license fees for on-demand selections are higher than for pre-programmed streams, and this is likely why Pandora’s featured playlists are only available on its $9.99-monthly Premium tier. It is also related to Spotify’s challenges with its business model, because these higher costs make it harder to be profitable. Pandora is leveraging the new work put in by its “wickedly expert curators” to add new stations for its Free and $4.99-monthly Plus tiers. In terms of math, this is going to get interesting because Pandora’s personalization analytics will be getting new data from users’ interactions with its human curators’ work.In terms of language, Pandora’s featured playlists really speak Millennial, and that’s fun. So we have new playlists with names like “Heartbreak Reggae,” “The TRL Era,” and “Flexxx.” The wit passes down to free stations with edgy labels like “Keep It Lit,” “Hipster Brunch,” and “Beast Mode.” It can seem fragmented, trying to have something for everybody, but streaming services must grab attention to survive — then learning each individual’s preferences narrows down what gets recommended most prominently. So score one for humans. Even math-master Pandora has come around to giving human curators leading roles in answering today’s epic question, “What should I stream next?”Pandora Challenges College Students For Social ImpactRead more Twitter News last_img

Tamil movies on May 1 holiday Watch hit films on Sun TV

first_imgA collage of the Tamil movies which will be aired on 1 May, 2019.PR HandoutHolidays are big occasion for Tamil TV channels as they try to bring out their best content in their bid to increase their TRP numbers. Every channel plans their content in advance and air hit films to boosts their revenues.Like Pongal and Puthandu, 1 May too has become an important date for the TV channels as the people will be in the mood to watch movies on a World Labour Day holiday. Like every year, leading channels are set to screen big films and here we are giving you the complete list of films that will be telecast on Thala Ajith’s birthday.Movies on Sun TVJayam Ravi’s science fiction Tik Tik Tik at 12.30 pm. Thalapathy Vijay’s revenge drama Theri will be telecast at 3.30 pm.  Ajith and Nayanthara’s Viswasam will be aired at 6.30 pm.Movies on Jaya TVAjith and Nayanthara’s action thriller Arrambam will be telecast at 9.30 am. Ajith and Shruti Haasan’s Vedalam will be aired at 4.30 pm on Jaya TV. Ajith, Anushka and Trisha’s Yennai Arindhaal will be aired at 8 pm on Jaya TV.Other Channels Horror comedy Hello Naan Pei Pesuren will be aired at 10.30 am on KTV. Karthik Thangavel-directorial Adanga Maru, which stars Jayam Ravi, will be telecast at 2.30 pm on Vijay TV. Ajith’s Ji will be aired on J Movies at 7 am and 4 pm. His Anjaneya will be telecast at 7 pm.last_img

Baltimore Cherry Hills Little Spelman Gang Member Sentenced to 12 Years on

first_imgOn June 30, Shaquan ‘Quanny’ Robinson was sentenced to 12 years in prison for conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute heroin and crack cocaine.  Robinson was a member of the Cherry Hill gang called “Little Spelman,” which has been associated with various crimes including robbery, non-fatal shootings, homicides and drug distribution in the “down the hill” section of the troubled Baltimore neighborhood.In May of 2013, the 26-year-old was caught on police cameras handling drug transactions on a school playground. The police uncovered 24 Ziploc bags of cocaine and two bags of marijuana near and on his person. In his plea agreement, Robinson also admitted to possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug conspiracy related to his membership in Little Spelman. In July of 2012, Robinson ran away from the police with a loaded handgun, which he later dropped and which was recovered by the police.Along with a dozen years in the slammer, U.S. District Judge George L. Russell III sentenced Robinson to 10 years of supervised release after he leaves prison. The sentence was announced by the United States Attorney for the District of Maryland Rod J. Rosenstein; Daniel L Board Jr., special agent in charge of Baltimore’s Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives; Commissioner Kevin Davis of the Baltimore Police Department and Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby.last_img

Researchers suggest rate of evolution change can explain discrepancy between molecular clocks

first_img(Phys.org) —A pair of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Australia, believe they may have found a way to solve the discrepancy problem that exists between molecular biologists and paleontologists who disagree on the likely first appearance of placental mammals. They describe their new dating approach, which they call a “morphological clock” in their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B Citation: Researchers suggest rate of evolution change can explain discrepancy between molecular clocks and fossil evidence (2014, August 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-08-evolution-discrepancy-molecular-clocks-fossil.html More information: Ancient dates or accelerated rates? Morphological clocks and the antiquity of placental mammals, Proc. R. Soc. B 22 October 2014 vol. 281 no. 1793 20141278. rspb.royalsocietypublishing.or … nt/281/1793/20141278AbstractAnalyses of a comprehensive morphological character matrix of mammals using ‘relaxed’ clock models (which simultaneously estimate topology, divergence dates and evolutionary rates), either alone or in combination with an 8.5 kb nuclear sequence dataset, retrieve implausibly ancient, Late Jurassic–Early Cretaceous estimates for the initial diversification of Placentalia (crown-group Eutheria). These dates are much older than all recent molecular and palaeontological estimates. They are recovered using two very different clock models, and regardless of whether the tree topology is freely estimated or constrained using scaffolds to match the current consensus placental phylogeny. This raises the possibility that divergence dates have been overestimated in previous analyses that have applied such clock models to morphological and total evidence datasets. Enforcing additional age constraints on selected internal divergences results in only a slight reduction of the age of Placentalia. Constraining Placentalia to less than 93.8 Ma, congruent with recent molecular estimates, does not require major changes in morphological or molecular evolutionary rates. Even constraining Placentalia to less than 66 Ma to match the ‘explosive’ palaeontological model results in only a 10- to 20-fold increase in maximum evolutionary rate for morphology, and fivefold for molecules. The large discrepancies between clock- and fossil-based estimates for divergence dates might therefore be attributable to relatively small changes in evolutionary rates through time, although other explanations (such as overly simplistic models of morphological evolution) need to be investigated. Conversely, dates inferred using relaxed clock models (especially with discrete morphological data and MRBAYES) should be treated cautiously, as relatively minor deviations in rate patterns can generate large effects on estimated divergence dates. Explore further Research team claims fossil-only study of placental mammalian evolution time frame is wrongcenter_img To date the first appearance of a something in the biological record, modern scientists have two main tools—dating fossils and using what’s known as a molecular clock, where DNA techniques are used to follow the evolution of species divergence. Problems come in when the two methods offer different results. That’s been the case with researchers attempting to date the first arrival of placental mammals. The earliest fossils suggest they showed up on the scene approximately 66 million years ago. The molecular clock approach, however, suggests it happened long before that, approximately 90 to 100 million years ago. In this new effort, the research pair suggest a way to resolve the difference (without claiming that the difference is because older fossils have just not been found.) They call their approach a morphological clock, which is based on the progression of anatomical differences that arise in a species, rather than DNA tracing. Using it, they suggest it’s possible that placental mammals first arrived as early as 160 million years ago. But they have a caveat, they suggest, that the speed at which evolutionary changes took place could have changed, which if taken into account, would bring the time frame closer to 66 million years ago. As for why a change in speed of evolution might have taken place, the team notes that it might have occurred soon after the dinosaurs went extinct—which would have opened up a whole new niche that could have been filled very quickly by the advent of placental mammals.If this new approach is to be taken seriously, it would cast doubts on the accuracy of molecular clocks in general—they’re based on the assumption that evolution occurs at a fixed rate. It could also help explain the “sudden” appearance of a wide variety of species 540 million years ago—the Cambrian explosion—which many believe led to the appearance of all modern animal groups. © 2014 Phys.org A four-day-old mouse. Credit: Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img