Triangles pintsize speakers are highend masters

first_img Tags Share your voice Speakers Audio Comment The Triangle Esprit Titus EZ speakers Triangle HiFi I’ve covered a lot of American and British audiophile speakers in my time, but French contenders, rarely. This one, the Esprit Titus EZ from Triangle HiFi may be the first I’ve heard from that company, but there will likely be many more. Triangle was founded in 1980 in France, how I overlooked Triangle this long is beyond me. The Esprit Titus EZ is a small, two-way bookshelf design fitted with a 1-inch (25mm) horn loaded titanium tweeter and a 5-inch (127mm) cellulose midrange/woofer. Both drivers are designed in-house. There’s a small bass port on the rear baffle, and some of the most beautifully crafted all-metal speaker cable binding posts I’ve ever seen.  The speaker is nice and compact, just 12 x 6.2 x 10.5 inches (306x167x257mm). My gleaming white Titus EZ samples had attractive, magnetically-attached white cloth grilles, but I listened with the drivers exposed. The Esprit EZ sells for $1,250 per pair in high-gloss black or white, $1,000 in vinyl walnut or black ash in the US; £620 and £740 respectively in the UK; AU$1,399 and AU$1,699 in Australia. I don’t recommend using the Titus EZ with receivers, unless they are rated to handle 4-ohm speakers. The Titus EZ is a small two-way speakers with 5 inch woofers and so you can’t expect it to be a head banger’s or party speaker.  Easy listening with the Titus EZThe Titus EZ arrived on my doorstep right after the Wharfedale Linton Heritage speakers departed. The Lintons are much larger bookshelf speakers that retail for $1,198 a pair, in line with the Titus EZ pricewise. The Lintons make a ton of bass, play loud with ease, and they’re more dynamically alive.  Still, the Titus EZ was enjoyable and wholly satisfying, just on a smaller scale, and it would be a better fit for small to midsize rooms.  The Titus EZ has a sweet, beautiful tone that makes harsh recordings a little easier on the ears. It may be a horn speaker, but it’s not about to threaten the Klipsch RP 600M horn speaker for dynamic “slam” or power, the Titus EZ is more polite than that.One of my musician audiophile pals dropped by while I was working on the Titus EZ review, and while he can be pretty fussy about sound he was quite taken with the Esprit EZ. He was especially impressed with the way these speakers reproduced the sound of drums and cymbals. This speaker digs deep into the quieter detail of recordings, so you hear atmosphere of the recording venue or studio. The Titus EZ tweeter is clear and clean, but it’s not going to make everyday, compressed recordings sound annoyingly harsh.To test the Titus EZ’s low-bass abilities I cued up Fabriclive. 54: David Rodigan, a tasty collection of classic reggae, dance hall and dub music. Definition and fullness were decent, but if you listen to a steady diet of bass-heavy music, plan on adding a subwoofer. Same as you would for any small speaker with a 5-inch woofer. The KEF LS50 speaker is close to the same size as the ‘EZ, but the LS50 is a little less sensitive, but somewhat more weighty-sounding speaker in the bass. Definition was better, too. Still, the Titus EZ sounded richer on male vocals, which subjectively warmed up the overall tonal balance. It’s a mellower, more “relaxed”-sounding speaker. Stereo imaging was wide, but image focus wasn’t as sharp as the LS50s’. I like both of these speakers, and they’re both high-quality mini monitors so there’s no easy call here. I really enjoyed my time with the Triangle Esprit Titus EZ speakers. They’re ideal for buyers craving a very musical, highly refined speaker for use with audiophile electronics in smaller spaces. I’m just starting with Triangle speakers; I hope to report on their higher-end Signature or Magellan series speakers later this year. The Audiophiliac 1last_img

The Vegan Trainer to step up his presence in fitness marketplace

first_imgTay SweatPR HandoutTay Sweat has worked with more than 4,000 clients and helped them in losing weight, keeping fit and living a healthier lifestyle through The Vegan Trainer. He is now step up his presence in fitness marketplace.The Nashville native who holds a variety of certifications ranging from being NASM Certified in personal training/CPT, Holistic Nutrition, as well as serving as a weight loss specialist, iridology/science of reading the body, and corrective exercise specialist is one of the most sought-after fitness experts in the field.Tay Sweat said, “I love helping new, as well as my steady clientele find the way to lose the weight they want to shed and show them how to keep it off once they do. Expanding my fitness plan and training more people about a positive, healthy lifestyle is an exciting next chapter for me and them!”Tay Sweat was initially not aware about healthy lifestyles since he was an overweight teenager who had no clue about how carbs, fats and proteins were not the greatest diet. Instead, he said he was eating simply for survival.With his bad eating habits came diabetes, heart disease, hypertension and bad skin discoloration, as well as eczema when he was 15 years old. Knowing his life needed a change, Sweat started to study health and nutrition. When he was 21, Sweat decided to follow a plant-based vegan diet and over the years he has been teaching others how to follow a vegan diet for a better life like the one found. Within 3 years of research, he was able to drop 120 pounds by healthy eating and fasting.That’s when Tay Sweat decided to take his newly found knowledge and became a health professional. He also participated in a mentorship and guidance from a few well-known Eastern doctors. They helped him achieve multiple certifications and degrees he now possesses.Sweat now serves clients around the world from Australia, Japan, the UK, Canada and across the United States, and has a collective of more than 100,000 pounds of lost.The Vegan Trainer said, he is looking forward to training others and leading them on the path to a healthier lifestyle where they not only feel but also look terrific, as he expands his presence in the fitness industry.The Vegan Trainer has over 115,000 followers on Instagram, 50,000 on Facebook, 10,000 on YouTube, and till date has worked with more than 4,000 clients. For those who are serious about losing weight, keeping fit and living a healthier lifestyle, The Vegan Trainer is stepping up his presence in the fitness marketplace even more.last_img

2 siblings missing as boat sinks in Buriganga

first_imgTwo siblings went missing as a boat capsized in the Buriganga river at Sadarghat on Friday evening, reports UNB.The victims are Sumi, 18, daughter of Sumit Gazi of Char Kaliganj and her brother Rabiul Gazi, 8.The victims’ father said that his wife along with three of their children was going to Sadarghat to board a Barishal-bound launch in the evening, but their boat capsized in the mid-river.Although his wife and elder son managed to swim ashore, his daughter and another son could not, he added.The boat capsized due to strong current in the river as well as waves created by MV Sharuk-1, said Abdur Rajjak, officer-in-charge of Sadarghat naval police station.On information, members of Fire Service and Civil Defence rushed there, he said, adding that divers were searching for the bodies.last_img

Ward 8 Dems Dont Endorse in Chairman AtLarge Race

first_imgBy James Wright, Special to the AFRO, jwright@afro.comThe chairman of the D.C. Council, and one of the at-large council members, didn’t receive an endorsement from one of the most influential political organizations in the District of Columbia.On April 21, the Ward 8 Democrats held their endorsement meeting for the positions of the District Attorney General, chairman of the D.C. Council, and the Democratic at-large seat on the council at the D.C. Vehicle for Hire Department in the ward. Ward 8 Democratic voters were eligible to cast ballots for the three positions and there were members of the D.C. Democratic State Committee members from other wards to police the process and see that it ran smoothly.Anita Bonds is running for re-election as a Democratic at-large council member. (AFRO File Photo)The voting took place from 12-2 p.m.The endorsements are for the June 19 Democratic primary. The winner of the Democratic primary for the three positions are favorites to win the Nov. 6 general election because the city is 74 percent Democratic, according to D.C. Board of Elections statistics.For a candidate to receive an endorsement from the Ward 8 Democrats, they needed to get 60 percent of the votes that were cast. In this instance, a candidate would have had to get 46 votes out of the 78 cast.D.C. Council member Anita Bonds (D-At Large) is running for re-election to a second full term. Bonds is running against Ward 8 activist Aaron Holmes, environmental leader Jeremiah Lowery and real estate professional Marcus Goodwin in the June 19 Democratic Party primary.Bonds got 33 votes, 13 short of the endorsement while Holmes got 21, Goodwin received 12 and Lowery had eight. Despite not getting the Ward 8 Democrats nod, Bonds told the AFRO she was satisfied with the result.“I am pleased that I came and participated,” she said. “I would note that one of my opponents came from this ward and I got more votes than he did.”WHO IS SHE TALKING ABOUT?Goodwin credited the leadership of the Ward 8 Democrats for having an open process. “The result was nothing profound to me but I take my hat off to the Ward 8 Democrats for giving the candidates a fair opportunity,” he said to the AFRO. Goodwin noted that the late Marion Barry, the four-term mayor and elected four times to represent the ward on the D.C. Council, would have supported Bonds and she would have gotten the endorsement outright because of his influence.During the council candidates’ forum that took place during the voting, all agreed that more affordable housing is needed in the District and the educational system is due for major improvements. They also agreed that the District should have a state-of the art hospital in its East End and not a jail, whether it is publicly or privately financed.In the chairman’s race, D.C. Council Chair Phil Mendelson came up three votes shy of winning the endorsement. However, there are three provisional ballots that need to be counted and they have the potential to earn the chairman the endorsement.Former D.C. Fiscal Policy Institute leader Ed Lazere had 20 votes to perennial candidate Calvin Gurley, the only African American in the race, who got eight. District Attorney General Karl Racine has no opponent in the Democratic primary and easily got past the 60 percent threshold.last_img

Researchers suggest rate of evolution change can explain discrepancy between molecular clocks

first_img(Phys.org) —A pair of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Australia, believe they may have found a way to solve the discrepancy problem that exists between molecular biologists and paleontologists who disagree on the likely first appearance of placental mammals. They describe their new dating approach, which they call a “morphological clock” in their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B Citation: Researchers suggest rate of evolution change can explain discrepancy between molecular clocks and fossil evidence (2014, August 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-08-evolution-discrepancy-molecular-clocks-fossil.html More information: Ancient dates or accelerated rates? Morphological clocks and the antiquity of placental mammals, Proc. R. Soc. B 22 October 2014 vol. 281 no. 1793 20141278. rspb.royalsocietypublishing.or … nt/281/1793/20141278AbstractAnalyses of a comprehensive morphological character matrix of mammals using ‘relaxed’ clock models (which simultaneously estimate topology, divergence dates and evolutionary rates), either alone or in combination with an 8.5 kb nuclear sequence dataset, retrieve implausibly ancient, Late Jurassic–Early Cretaceous estimates for the initial diversification of Placentalia (crown-group Eutheria). These dates are much older than all recent molecular and palaeontological estimates. They are recovered using two very different clock models, and regardless of whether the tree topology is freely estimated or constrained using scaffolds to match the current consensus placental phylogeny. This raises the possibility that divergence dates have been overestimated in previous analyses that have applied such clock models to morphological and total evidence datasets. Enforcing additional age constraints on selected internal divergences results in only a slight reduction of the age of Placentalia. Constraining Placentalia to less than 93.8 Ma, congruent with recent molecular estimates, does not require major changes in morphological or molecular evolutionary rates. Even constraining Placentalia to less than 66 Ma to match the ‘explosive’ palaeontological model results in only a 10- to 20-fold increase in maximum evolutionary rate for morphology, and fivefold for molecules. The large discrepancies between clock- and fossil-based estimates for divergence dates might therefore be attributable to relatively small changes in evolutionary rates through time, although other explanations (such as overly simplistic models of morphological evolution) need to be investigated. Conversely, dates inferred using relaxed clock models (especially with discrete morphological data and MRBAYES) should be treated cautiously, as relatively minor deviations in rate patterns can generate large effects on estimated divergence dates. Explore further Research team claims fossil-only study of placental mammalian evolution time frame is wrongcenter_img To date the first appearance of a something in the biological record, modern scientists have two main tools—dating fossils and using what’s known as a molecular clock, where DNA techniques are used to follow the evolution of species divergence. Problems come in when the two methods offer different results. That’s been the case with researchers attempting to date the first arrival of placental mammals. The earliest fossils suggest they showed up on the scene approximately 66 million years ago. The molecular clock approach, however, suggests it happened long before that, approximately 90 to 100 million years ago. In this new effort, the research pair suggest a way to resolve the difference (without claiming that the difference is because older fossils have just not been found.) They call their approach a morphological clock, which is based on the progression of anatomical differences that arise in a species, rather than DNA tracing. Using it, they suggest it’s possible that placental mammals first arrived as early as 160 million years ago. But they have a caveat, they suggest, that the speed at which evolutionary changes took place could have changed, which if taken into account, would bring the time frame closer to 66 million years ago. As for why a change in speed of evolution might have taken place, the team notes that it might have occurred soon after the dinosaurs went extinct—which would have opened up a whole new niche that could have been filled very quickly by the advent of placental mammals.If this new approach is to be taken seriously, it would cast doubts on the accuracy of molecular clocks in general—they’re based on the assumption that evolution occurs at a fixed rate. It could also help explain the “sudden” appearance of a wide variety of species 540 million years ago—the Cambrian explosion—which many believe led to the appearance of all modern animal groups. © 2014 Phys.org A four-day-old mouse. Credit: Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img

Khalin Joshi wins Ahmedabad Masters

first_imgBangalore’s Khalin Joshi shot a course record of nine-under 63 on the final day to register a sensational come-from-behind victory at the PGTI Ahmedabad Masters golf championship on Friday.last_img