CAMPAIGN FINANCE Dave Robertson Raises 8500 Spends 11500 To Date

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Former Miceli Chief of Staff Dave Robertson (D-Tewksbury) was the third of the five Democratic candidates in the 19th Middlesex State Representative race to file his pre-primary (May 7 to August 26) campaign finance report with the Massachusetts Office of Campaign and Political Finance.DonorsDave Robertson’s campaign has raised $8,440 from 82 donors, with an average (mean) donation of $102.93. Notable Wilmington donors (elected or appointed officials) include School Committee member MJ Byrnes, Housing Authority member Stacie Murphy, and Elderly Services Commissioner John Wallace.SpendingDave Robertson’s campaign has spent $11,444 as of August 26. This amount includes $4,148.70 in campaign expenditures and $10,870.05 in out-of-pocket candidate expenditures for a total expenditure of $15,018.75. Included in the $4,148.70, however, is a repayment to Robertson in the amount of $3,574.95 for out-of-pocket expenditures. As a result, that amount is essentially being counted twice — once as a “campaign expenditure” and once as an “out-of-pocket candidate expenditure.”Major expenditures include:$4,378.83 to the Wilmington/Tewksbury Town Crier for newspaper advertisements$2,327.40 to Wamesit Lanes for Campaign Kick-Off Event$2,256.75 to Connolly Printing for Lawn Signs$573.75 to Connolly Printing for Dear Friend Cards$532 to Connolly Printing for Invites, Envelopes & Campaign Letterhead$476 to Connolly Printing for Palm Cards$600 to USPS for StampsRead It For YourselfDave Robertson’s pre-primary campaign finance report can be read HERE.(NOTE: Wilmington Apple will report on each candidate’s campaign finance report over the next few days.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedCAMPAIGN FINANCE: Mark Kratman Raises More Money From Donors Than His 4 Primary Opponents COMBINEDIn “Government”CAMPAIGN FINANCE: Erika Johnson Raises Nearly $3,000, Primarily From Small DonorsIn “Government”STATE REP RACE: Tewksbury Republican Committee Attack Robertson Over Wilmington Democratic Committee Chair’s StatementIn “Government”last_img

BMWs new smart glasses can put technical drawings right in front of

first_img 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous Post a comment Review • 2019 BMW X2 M35i review: A fun, potent little crossover BMW 84 Photos Now playing: Watch this: More about 2019 BMW X2 M35i Preview • 2019 BMW X2 M35i first drive: High-riding hot hatch Enlarge ImageIf this tech prevents me from having to pound a third cup of dealership coffee while I twiddle my thumbs, great. BMW It’s been a long time since Google Glass arrived and promptly departed from the world, but automakers think they have a much smarter solution for smart glasses, and BMW is the latest to show off this tech.BMW announced on Tuesday that it has developed a new set of smart glasses for its dealership technicians. The TSARAVision Smart Glasses, named after BMW’s new online case-reporting system TSARA, can be used to speed up diagnostic and repair procedures by offering up everything a tech needs without having to thumb through physical manuals or pick up a phone. The glasses, which don’t really resemble glasses in the traditional sense, have the ability to put step-by-step instructions or technical drawings right in front of a technician’s eyes. The glasses can also take screenshots, and they’re capable of zooming in on photos to get a little extra detail when necessary. In the event a problem proves too tricky, a tech can also uses the smart glasses to phone home to Germany, where engineers can get a live look at the problem to better work through it. If the tech needs to open up a new document, he or she can do so with just their voice, keeping hands free for the actual nitty-gritty work.BMW says this new tech should be at all BMW dealers by June. It’s not the first company to try something like this, though. We got to experience Porsche’s Tech Live Look smart glasses last year, which look equally silly but are built with the same goal in mind — speeding up the repair process from every angle possible. More From Roadshow 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything bettercenter_img 3:07 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value 2020 BMW M8 Coupe and Convertible deliver big horsepower and luxury Share your voice Auto Tech Car Industry Tags BMW 0 Porsche’s AR glasses help us fix a car in cyberspacelast_img

2 siblings missing as boat sinks in Buriganga

first_imgTwo siblings went missing as a boat capsized in the Buriganga river at Sadarghat on Friday evening, reports UNB.The victims are Sumi, 18, daughter of Sumit Gazi of Char Kaliganj and her brother Rabiul Gazi, 8.The victims’ father said that his wife along with three of their children was going to Sadarghat to board a Barishal-bound launch in the evening, but their boat capsized in the mid-river.Although his wife and elder son managed to swim ashore, his daughter and another son could not, he added.The boat capsized due to strong current in the river as well as waves created by MV Sharuk-1, said Abdur Rajjak, officer-in-charge of Sadarghat naval police station.On information, members of Fire Service and Civil Defence rushed there, he said, adding that divers were searching for the bodies.last_img

Finding a Niche

first_img “Each category is like a little pond where you can be a big fish,” says Mary Margaret Gibson, 61, president of Mirrors and Light Gallery (eBay User ID: maam1945), based in The Colony, Texas. Mirrors and Light specializes in unique, artist-made kaleidoscopes and jewelry. “Our plan was to have more and better kaleidoscopes than anybody else out there,” says Gibson. “There aren’t many who sell kaleidoscopes on a regu-lar basis [on eBay],” or in the volume that Mirrors and Light does. At any particular time, the company typically has 100 or so kaleidoscopes available through eBay for hobbyists, collectors and fans, ranging in price from $700 to $3,500.Because its products are much more expensive than typical eBay merchandise, Mirrors and Light has worked hard to develop a level of trust with buyers, especially the 30 percent of its customer base that is overseas. Gibson knows that overseas customers may be wary of sending several hundred dollars to an unknown seller in another part of the world. To address any reservations, Gibson went so far as to write a book, The Kaleidoscope Collector’s Guide. She also communicates frequently with the company’s core audience about its artists and products.Gibson explains that the kaleidoscopes being sold are either from private collections, self-representing artists, or a family or broker selling off an estate. And in some cases, Gibson acts as broker, helping research and evaluate individual pieces, and selling kaleidoscopes on eBay for individuals unfamiliar with them.Starting from scratch in 2004, Mirrors and Light expects to hit sales of just under $150,000 in 2006 from its online sales of kaleidoscopes and new jewelry.No LimitsInterestingly, choosing a narrowly defined niche does not prevent those outside your core customer group from buying from you, say Jennifer Basye Sander and Peter Sander, co-authors of Niche and Grow Rich. Rather, as a niche seller, you will have an easier time establishing yourself as the source for a particular type of product and still attract new buyers. For instance, if your niche is vintage Hermès scarves, your products will be presented to buyers who search for that exact phrase as well as to buyers simply looking for “scarves,” “vintage” or “Hermès.” Creating a niche doesn’t limit opportunities; in fact, it often results in more business. You won’t limit your buyers, and specializing in a particular product category will frequently make you a preferred seller to your target customers.Scratch That NicheTo zero in on a niche that’s not only profitable, but also fits your interests and background, check out these ebay tools.The eBay “Hot List”: A report provided by eBay and accessible from the “Sell” area of the site, the “Hot List” (http://pages.ebay.com/sellercentral/whatshot.html) identifies categories with the greatest increase in listings over a certain time period. Because people list more often in a category when demand is increasing, it’s a useful gauge of demand, says John Bodine, product manager for eBay Market-place Research.eBay Pulse: For a quick look at what buyers are searching for, eBay Pulse lists the top 10 search terms on the site (http://pulse.ebay.com). If you subscribe to eBay Marketplace Research, you can see the top 20 terms.Keyword Search: Anyone can use this simple tool to search for types of products and see how many are already listed–essentially, how much competition there is. Search completed listings to determine the typical selling price of an item. Most important, say eBay sellers and experts alike, is finding a niche you love.Gold Mine or Land Mine?If you think you’ve found a winner, ebay marketplace research can give you the following information to help you determine whether your proposed niche will make you rich.Size of The Opportunity: Using eBay Marketplace Research, you can search by product category to find the average selling price of products you’re interested in. Then you can check the number of items sold in that same category. Multiply the average selling price by the number of items sold, and divide by the number of months reported (either two or three, depending on your subscription level), and you have the approximate size of the sales opportunity per month, explains Nick Donelson, product manager for eBay Marketplace Research.Trends: You Ultimately want to enter a category with increasing demand and a rising average selling price, says Donelson. You can use eBay Marketplace Research to chart category performance by day or by week and to spot upticks in demand and price.Sales Forecasting: To determine how long it takes for a type of product to sell, look up average selling price and success rate. This will give you a ballpark idea of how long it will take to sell something. For instance, if 200 listings for McDonald’s memorabilia ended and 100 items sold, you can infer that 50 percent of the listings in this category are completed. Based on that information, you can opt to drop your price to sell your product faster, or you can expect to have to list your goods twice for them to sell, says Donelson.The cost to subscribe to eBay Marketplace Research varies according to the term length, which ranges from two days to a month. A Fast Pass provides two days of access for $2.99 and up to 60 days of historical sales information. The Basic level costs $9.99 per month for 60 days’ worth of data, and the Pro level costs $24.99 per month but provides up to 90 days of historical data and detailed information to help optimize your listings. October 30, 2006 Sure, the flexibility of being able to sell anything and everything on eBay sounds appealing. But specializing–carving out a niche in a particular category or type of product–can yield even greater rewards. For starters, explains Michael Miller, author of Making a Living From Your eBay Business, you’ll know your market and your products more thoroughly than you ever could as a generalist. “You can sell on eBay and not specialize, but it’s more hobby than business,” Miller observes. “The biggest eBay sellers I know do one or two things well.” Knowing a lot about one or two areas, vs. knowing only a little about many categories, can make the difference between being profitable and being very profitable.Seeking out what sellsCase in point: Steve Weber, 46, owner of Weber Books (eBay User ID: weber-books), a Falls Church, Virginia, reseller of used books. Although he made $300 or $400 on eBay the first month he began selling from his own bookshelves, Weber’s sales took off when he zeroed in on specific types of nonfiction books that were in demand. In 2005, four years after Weber started his business part time, the now full-time enterprise sold $335,000 online–more than 100 times what the business was initially generating. It all came down to finding a niche.At the outset, Weber worked part time in the evenings selling books he no longer needed. “I wasn’t an expert in book values,” he admits, but he did notice that nonfiction books tended to be more valuable than fiction, and science and math tomes in particular sold for far more than he anticipated. So he began going to library and estate sales–“the two best ways to get inventory”–in search of science and math guides. His efforts paid off when he purchased a box of books at a sale for a whopping $10. In the box was a book titled Curves and Their Properties, which Weber was able to sell for $200.”The way to make money is to find a specialty,” says Weber. “It’s helpful to start with a niche because you can learn a specific product area and you’re not re-inventing the wheel all the time–you quickly learn what sells.” He recommends that anyone interested in selling books on eBay start with used merchandise because “there’s more profit potential.”However, Weber cautions that mass market books, such as The DaVinci Code, may not necessarily sell for more than what you paid because there are already so many of them in circulation. On the other hand, more unusual books that appeal to a limited audience may take a little longer to sell on eBay, but they can sell for more (sometimes much more) than the original cover price, even if they’re not in pristine condition. With such quirky titles, “condition is not as important as the information they contain,” says Weber.Approximately one-third of Weber’s time is spent finding books, with big pushes during January and August, the two biggest bookselling months of the year. Each month, he buys at least 5,000 used books to resell, in addition to the new books he’s been selling since 2003. Through wholesale sellers online, such as Book Depot (www.bookdepot.com) and Kudzu Books (www.kudzubooks.com), Weber finds that he can buy overstock for 80 percent off retail and then resell the books profitably over the next several months. (You can find more potential product sources in “Finders, Sellers” on page 22.)The strategy has worked for Weber: “I’m making more money than ever,” he says, “because I keep getting better and better at [selling certain types of books] within my niche.” Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global A Well-Oiled Machine Big Fish in a Small Pond Register Now » 11 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Another advantage niche businesses have is standardi-zation of processes and materials. For example, Weber needs to stock only a few sizes of boxes and packages for shipping his books rather than hundreds of varieties. “Back-end efficiency, such as with packing and shipping, and effectiveness improve with a niche,” confirms Miller. You can set up a routine, a type of assembly line, which reduces the time it takes to complete a sale and increases your profitability.Through experience in his category, Weber is also much faster at setting prices. He uses auction-style listings for some hard-to-find books in hopes that bidders will drive the prices up, and he sells others at fixed prices using “Buy It Now” when there is a general agreement about the value of a particular book.Pump Up the VolumeWhile Weber Books expanded from used books into new ones, Curvy Girl Clothing (eBay User ID: curvygirlclothing) has always been about new merchandise. The company focuses on new special-occasion wear for plus-size women, says Laura Poorman, 31, co-founder with her twin sister, Lisa Toton, of the Portland, Or-egon, company. Poorman and Toton began their eBay careers as buyers, with Poorman scouting convertible cars and Toton on the hunt for a wedding ring set. Both found what they were looking for on the site and, inspired by the potential selling opportunities, began discussions about running their own eBay Store filled with stylish plus-size clothing.To amass some inventory, the two headed to Los Angeles’ fashion district, near Toton’s home, and stocked up on trendy tops, dresses and skirts for women size 16 to 32. In the three-mile area that makes up the fashion district, Poorman and Toton discovered numerous stores willing to sell clothing to them at great prices. “We only had to buy a few items” in each size, says Poorman.Although they didn’t have experience selling on eBay, what they did have was knowledge of their market. As curvy women themselves, Poorman says, “We know what’s going to work for plus-size women, so we’re able to pick better styles.” And because they deal only in new merchandise, they can buy in larger volumes rather than offering single items, as with used pieces. “You can buy something [used] for $5 to $20 and sell [it] for $60, but you only have one,” she points out, “so it’s harder work.” Selling used items next to new ones also devalues the new items, which is why Curvy Girl stays focused on its new-clothing niche.The twins started doing business on eBay in summer 2005, and in October, they had their first $10,000 week in sales. By the end of their first year in business, sales are expected to reach $350,000.Poorman says one of the keys to their success thus far is “not losing focus.” By establishing their niche and sticking with it, Curvy Girl Clothing is building a brand that draws eBay buyers back regularly because they know exactly what they’ll find there. Says Poorman, “People like that we only do plus-size, stylish occasion wear.”last_img