CAMPAIGN FINANCE Dave Robertson Raises 8500 Spends 11500 To Date

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Former Miceli Chief of Staff Dave Robertson (D-Tewksbury) was the third of the five Democratic candidates in the 19th Middlesex State Representative race to file his pre-primary (May 7 to August 26) campaign finance report with the Massachusetts Office of Campaign and Political Finance.DonorsDave Robertson’s campaign has raised $8,440 from 82 donors, with an average (mean) donation of $102.93. Notable Wilmington donors (elected or appointed officials) include School Committee member MJ Byrnes, Housing Authority member Stacie Murphy, and Elderly Services Commissioner John Wallace.SpendingDave Robertson’s campaign has spent $11,444 as of August 26. This amount includes $4,148.70 in campaign expenditures and $10,870.05 in out-of-pocket candidate expenditures for a total expenditure of $15,018.75. Included in the $4,148.70, however, is a repayment to Robertson in the amount of $3,574.95 for out-of-pocket expenditures. As a result, that amount is essentially being counted twice — once as a “campaign expenditure” and once as an “out-of-pocket candidate expenditure.”Major expenditures include:$4,378.83 to the Wilmington/Tewksbury Town Crier for newspaper advertisements$2,327.40 to Wamesit Lanes for Campaign Kick-Off Event$2,256.75 to Connolly Printing for Lawn Signs$573.75 to Connolly Printing for Dear Friend Cards$532 to Connolly Printing for Invites, Envelopes & Campaign Letterhead$476 to Connolly Printing for Palm Cards$600 to USPS for StampsRead It For YourselfDave Robertson’s pre-primary campaign finance report can be read HERE.(NOTE: Wilmington Apple will report on each candidate’s campaign finance report over the next few days.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedCAMPAIGN FINANCE: Mark Kratman Raises More Money From Donors Than His 4 Primary Opponents COMBINEDIn “Government”CAMPAIGN FINANCE: Erika Johnson Raises Nearly $3,000, Primarily From Small DonorsIn “Government”STATE REP RACE: Tewksbury Republican Committee Attack Robertson Over Wilmington Democratic Committee Chair’s StatementIn “Government”last_img read more

From The Border to Houston Los Vaqueros Rio Grande Ride To The

first_img X 00:00 /03:25 To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Listen Share – / 5What happens on the Texas border with Mexico has a way of making the news these days. But sometimes, those who travel the roads from the Rio Grande Valley up to Houston are making the trip for symbolic reasons. Reasons of heritage and history, and these people make the trip on a horse.I’m talking with 81-year-old Larry Ramirez when some of his friends pull into an abandoned parking lot off Highway 59, their wagons and horses moving a little slower than the cars flying by behind us.“It’s a good ride, it’s a long ride,” Ramirez says. “A long, hard ride.”He and his team are headed to the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. Ramirez founded this trail ride team, one of 13 teams converging on Houston from all over Texas. His group started their journey at the border. A lifelong Houstonian, Ramirez drove big rigs for about two decades, but he wouldn’t call that his life’s work.“I’ve done everything a man could possibly do,” he says.Ramirez founded “Los Vaqueros Rio Grande” 45 years ago for one simple reason.“Because there were no Hispanic rides when I started.”“I approached the stock show and I said well, ‘how come there are no Hispanic rides coming in?’ And they said ‘well nobody has approached us,’ so I approached them and they granted me a permit.”As to why he figured the ride should start from the border and travel the farthest distance of all the rodeo trail rides?“Ah, it was just a wild idea” he says. “I just thought ‘why not start from Mexico?’”Ramirez wanted this ride to honor his Hispanic heritage. He doesn’t know much about his grandparents or family further back, he says he was just too busy working most his life to investigate the family tree. So this is, in a way, his chance to explore that history.One of Ramirez’s riding buddies is Gary Foster. He braves the Texas highways on 19th century wagons out of a fascination with old customs and old technology. He shows me around his ride – a “Melbourne Model 88.” Foster says he believes it was built somewhere around the middle of 1890.Explaining the art of a horse harness, he says he keeps this wagon as authentic as possible to the time it comes from – no rubber tires, all original undercarriage – and he drives mules, not horses, like the old-timers used to. Foster’s taken the wagon on longer rides through Texas ranches, and he says there is more to it than just the gear.“When you spend six months traveling around like that, it’s a camaraderie that is unusual in this day and time, when a lot of people in the cities don’t even know their next door neighbor’s name.”Trail riders are a family he says, and family is what’s keeping “Los Vaqueros” alive.In his old age, Larry Ramirez is handing this ride off to his son David. Some parts of the ride have changed: decades ago the team started the trail from Mexico, but with tighter border controls through the years, it got too complicated and expensive to bring horses across the river. Still, the younger Ramirez says the team will be around for decades to come. “Oh it’ll last,” he says. “I mean somebody’s always going to be trail riding. I raised my kids up in this, and they’re going to continue to trail ride, it’s in their blood.”The elder Ramirez says he’s proud of what he’s accomplished with the riding team.“My sons are taking over the ride, it seems like they’re going to keep it alive after I’m gone, course I won’t know that,” he says with a hearty laugh.After a day of rest, the Ramirez family and their team will saddle up for Houston ahead of Saturday’s downtown parade.last_img read more

China looks to combustible ice as a fuel source

first_img(Left) Methane hydrate consists of a cage of water molecules trapping a methane molecule within. Credit: Slim Films for Suess et al., Scientific American, Nov. 1999, pp. 76-83. (Right) When methane hydrate is brought to the surface, the methane can be burnt off. Credit: Gary Klinkhammer, OSU-COAS. Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — Buried below the tundra of China’s Qinghai-Tibet Plateau is a type of frozen natural gas containing methane and ice crystals that could supply energy to China for 90 years. China discovered the large reserve of methane hydrate last September, and last week the Qinghai Province announced that it plans to allow researchers and energy companies to tap the energy source. Although methane hydrate is plentiful throughout the world, the key challenge for China and other nations will be to develop technologies to excavate the fuel without damaging the environment. © 2010 PhysOrg.com Methane hydrate is an ice-like substance that is sometimes called “combustible ice” since it can literally be lit on fire and burned as fuel. But rather than dig up the substance, excavators would likely melt the ice underground first, and then extract the methane gas. However, researchers are still investigating the most appropriate way to extract the fuel for commercialization.Methane hydrate is an attractive energy source due to its high energy density: one cubic meter of combustible ice contains about 164 cubic meters of regular natural gas. This high energy density is due to the fact that methane is trapped within the hydrate crystal structure and greatly compressed. According to the DOE, the immense energy content of methane occurring in hydrate form may possibly exceed the combined energy content of all other known fossil fuels. In addition, the frozen hydrate has few impurities, meaning it can burn cleaner with fewer pollutants than oil and possibly regular natural gas, as well.Combustible ice has already been discovered in more than 100 countries, buried in both the Arctic permafrost and beneath the ocean floor. Besides China, countries including the US, Japan, and the Republic of Korea have plans to tap the natural gas hydrate buried in their territories. Last summer, US scientists on a research vessel in the Gulf of Mexico discovered pockets of highly concentrated methane hydrate estimated to contain 6,700 trillion cubic feet of gas. The DOE has estimated that the total amount of methane hydrate worldwide could be as high as 400 million trillion cubic feet, including 85.4 trillion cubic feet buried in Alaska.Because methane is a potent greenhouse gas, researchers are also concerned about the environmental effects of extracting methane hydrate. However, if handled carefully, using methane hydrate as a fuel could be safer than simply letting it melt on its own. As the earth continues to warm, methane released into the atmosphere could cause even more damage than if it were burned for fuel. On the other hand, if large amounts of methane were accidentally released during extraction, the results could further aggravate global warming. Another risk from mining the combustible ice is geological slumping. For these reasons, developing a safe technology to excavate the fuel is a priority. With these challenges in mind, China’s Ministry of Land and Resources estimated last week that the country could begin using its combustible ice within 10 to 15 years, joining other countries in methane hydrate exploration. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: via: Xinhuannet and the US Dept. of Energy Citation: China looks to ‘combustible ice’ as a fuel source (2010, March 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-03-china-combustible-ice-fuel-source.html Alaskan drilling will assess gas hydratelast_img read more