BtoB Print Publishing Revs Up 2 Percent in March 33 Percent YTD

first_imgThis story first appears on FOLIO: sister site, min.With rebounds in the categories of business, advertising and marketing, as well as building, engineering and construction categories leading the way, b-to-b print revenue posted gains of 2 percent in March 2011, compared to March 2010. American Business Media’s Business Information Network (BIN) shows gains in eight of the 21 markets it covers. Business, advertising and marketing was up 23.4 percent and building, engineering and construction was up 19 percent.Read the rest of the story here.last_img

A Better Logo for Better Homes and Gardens

first_imgBetter Homes and Gardens has a new logo for the first time since 1965. Starting with its January 2017 issue, “and” is replaced with a stylized ampersand, and the long-standing three lines of text are truncated to two. The new identity system and refreshed logo, while aesthetically pleasing, also solves a practical issue, Stephen Orr, editor-in-chief since 2015, tells Folio:. Fitting the 51-year-old logo to digital avatars and brand extensions, like Better Home and Gardens Real Estate, has proven difficult. Now, the social avatar stacks “BH” over “&G” with white text inside of a black circle. This will replace the magazine’s current digital logo, a red background with “BHG” centered in a white, bolded, sans-serif font. Better Homes and Gardens is the largest brand at Meredith, and Meredith is the second largest consumer license brand in the world. This means the new logo will be seen on a lot of different products — from homeware sold at Walmart, to cookbooks, to real estate. The magazine also claims 40 million readers, with a verified rate base of 7,600,000 for its print issues. “They were really just thinking about the print magazine,” Orr says of the magazine’s mid-century editors. “But brands like BH&G are comprehensive brands. We needed something that was more flexible.” The new logo from January 2017 Due to the scale of use, the brand decided to partner with Lippincot, a creative agency that redesigned the Starbucks mermaid, as well as the Meredith corporate logo. The process took almost 10 months, Orr says, and involved over 75 different versions. The ampersand, while fresh in its design, is not new to the magazine. Better Homes and Gardens first launched in 1922 with “and” written out, but from 1931 until the late 40’s, the logo contained an ampersand along with its ever shifting typography. The old logo from December 2016last_img

Triangles pintsize speakers are highend masters

first_img Tags Share your voice Speakers Audio Comment The Triangle Esprit Titus EZ speakers Triangle HiFi I’ve covered a lot of American and British audiophile speakers in my time, but French contenders, rarely. This one, the Esprit Titus EZ from Triangle HiFi may be the first I’ve heard from that company, but there will likely be many more. Triangle was founded in 1980 in France, how I overlooked Triangle this long is beyond me. The Esprit Titus EZ is a small, two-way bookshelf design fitted with a 1-inch (25mm) horn loaded titanium tweeter and a 5-inch (127mm) cellulose midrange/woofer. Both drivers are designed in-house. There’s a small bass port on the rear baffle, and some of the most beautifully crafted all-metal speaker cable binding posts I’ve ever seen.  The speaker is nice and compact, just 12 x 6.2 x 10.5 inches (306x167x257mm). My gleaming white Titus EZ samples had attractive, magnetically-attached white cloth grilles, but I listened with the drivers exposed. The Esprit EZ sells for $1,250 per pair in high-gloss black or white, $1,000 in vinyl walnut or black ash in the US; £620 and £740 respectively in the UK; AU$1,399 and AU$1,699 in Australia. I don’t recommend using the Titus EZ with receivers, unless they are rated to handle 4-ohm speakers. The Titus EZ is a small two-way speakers with 5 inch woofers and so you can’t expect it to be a head banger’s or party speaker.  Easy listening with the Titus EZThe Titus EZ arrived on my doorstep right after the Wharfedale Linton Heritage speakers departed. The Lintons are much larger bookshelf speakers that retail for $1,198 a pair, in line with the Titus EZ pricewise. The Lintons make a ton of bass, play loud with ease, and they’re more dynamically alive.  Still, the Titus EZ was enjoyable and wholly satisfying, just on a smaller scale, and it would be a better fit for small to midsize rooms.  The Titus EZ has a sweet, beautiful tone that makes harsh recordings a little easier on the ears. It may be a horn speaker, but it’s not about to threaten the Klipsch RP 600M horn speaker for dynamic “slam” or power, the Titus EZ is more polite than that.One of my musician audiophile pals dropped by while I was working on the Titus EZ review, and while he can be pretty fussy about sound he was quite taken with the Esprit EZ. He was especially impressed with the way these speakers reproduced the sound of drums and cymbals. This speaker digs deep into the quieter detail of recordings, so you hear atmosphere of the recording venue or studio. The Titus EZ tweeter is clear and clean, but it’s not going to make everyday, compressed recordings sound annoyingly harsh.To test the Titus EZ’s low-bass abilities I cued up Fabriclive. 54: David Rodigan, a tasty collection of classic reggae, dance hall and dub music. Definition and fullness were decent, but if you listen to a steady diet of bass-heavy music, plan on adding a subwoofer. Same as you would for any small speaker with a 5-inch woofer. The KEF LS50 speaker is close to the same size as the ‘EZ, but the LS50 is a little less sensitive, but somewhat more weighty-sounding speaker in the bass. Definition was better, too. Still, the Titus EZ sounded richer on male vocals, which subjectively warmed up the overall tonal balance. It’s a mellower, more “relaxed”-sounding speaker. Stereo imaging was wide, but image focus wasn’t as sharp as the LS50s’. I like both of these speakers, and they’re both high-quality mini monitors so there’s no easy call here. I really enjoyed my time with the Triangle Esprit Titus EZ speakers. They’re ideal for buyers craving a very musical, highly refined speaker for use with audiophile electronics in smaller spaces. I’m just starting with Triangle speakers; I hope to report on their higher-end Signature or Magellan series speakers later this year. The Audiophiliac 1last_img

Chandina road crash kills 2 women

first_imgTwo women were killed as a pick-up van hit an auto-rickshaw at Chandina upazila of Dhaka-Chattagram highway on Thursday morning, reports UNB.The identity of the deceased could not be known immediately.Witnesses said the auto-rickshaw suddenly came in front of the pick-up van as it was trying to escape from the patrolling police in the area.Additional policemen were patrolling on the road as road transport and bridges minister Obaidul Quader was scheduled to visit Cumilla today.The accident left one dead on the spot and another seriously injured.The injured woman succumbed to her injuries after being rushed to Chandina Upazila Health Complex.After the incident, agitated locals blocked the road near Palki Cinema Hall of Chandina of the Dhaka- Chattogram highway for an hour around 12 noon.Superintendent of police (SP) of Cumilla, Shah Md Abid Hossain confirmed the matter and said, “The three-wheeler was completely forbidden on the highway.”He also said action will be taken against those who blocked the highways.last_img

Raininduced landslide wall collapse claim 3 lives

first_imgFire service men recover body of a person killed in Chattogram landslide. Photo: Sourav DasAt least three people including a woman and her daughter were killed and another woman missing in two separate incidents of landslide and wall collapse in Chattogram early Sunday following incessant rainfall for several days due to the influence of cyclonic storm Titli.The deceased are Nurjahan Begum, 43, wife of a certain Nur Mohammad from Firoz Shah Colony in Akbar Shaha thana of the port city and the couple’s 3-year-old daughter Fajr-un-Nesa and Nurun Nabi, 45, from Rahman Nagar area of Panchlaish thana.Fire service men conduct rescue work to recover the bodies. Photo: Sourav DasNurjahan Begum and her daughter Fajr-un-Nesa were killed and a woman, Zohra Bibi, remained missing after a section of a hill collapsed in Jhil area of Firoz Shah Colony around 2:30am, said Chattogram fire service and civil defence deputy assistant director Jasim Uddin.UNB reported that a rescue operation was underway in the area.Relative of a deceased killed in Chattogram landslide seen crying. Photo: Sourav DasIn an incident of wall collapse, Nurun Nabi was killed in Rahman Nagar area of Panchlaish around 1:30am, said Enamul Haque, in-charge of Bayezid fire station and civil defence station.On information, two fire fighting units rushed in and rescued three people including a child as critically injured.The injured were rushed to Chittagong Medical College Hospital where physicians declared Nurun Nabi dead around 2:40am, he added.last_img

US May Day Immigration Protests Target Trump Fall Elections

first_img#MayDay, or #InternationalWorkersDay, is when we commemorate the struggle to secure the 8-hour work day and other worker protections. #1u pic.twitter.com/ezgHHSAvrO— AFSCME (@AFSCME) May 1, 2018 Share #MayDay2018: Arizona teachers go out on their 4th day of strikes and walkouts, as teacher mobilizations across the country rock a capitalist system failing to provide for people’s needs. #Red4Ed #MayDay pic.twitter.com/4RotkNr9kr— Socialist Alt HTX (@SocialistHTX) May 1, 2018center_img May Day around the world https://t.co/1sO5F9yQGw pic.twitter.com/sv6oy3Q2u4— TIME (@TIME) May 1, 2018Immigrants say President Donald Trump’s administration has become almost everything they feared, but while they rally across the United States on May Day, their focus is less on huge turnout Tuesday than on the first Tuesday in November.Marches and other demonstrations for labor and immigrant rights were planned from Florida to New York to California on International Workers’ Day and come amid similar actions worldwide.“The Trump administration has made very clear that they’ve declared war on the immigrant community on all levels,” said Javier Valdes, co-executive director of the advocacy group Make the Road New York.Immigrant rights groups have joined in May Day activities for more than a decade, initially to push back against harsh legislative proposals and later to clamor for reform and legal status for immigrants in the country illegally who were brought to the U.S. as children or overstayed their visas.Now, they want to drive turnout in the midterm elections. Advocates hope voters target lawmakers who have pushed for measures that hurt immigrants and replace them with immigrant-friendly policymakers, said Angelica Salas, executive director of the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights in Los Angeles.“Elections have consequences, and the consequences for our community have been dire, and if we do not change the balance of power, we question our ability to remain free in this country,” she said.Protesters still are taking aim at policy changes under Trump, including a country-specific travel ban, the end of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, high-profile detention and deportation efforts, and proposals to cut back the overall numbers of people allowed to immigrate permanently.Trump and his supporters say the enforcement and policy changes are needed for national security and economic benefits. Some of the new policies have gotten tangled up in court, and Trump hasn’t secured funding for his coveted border wall with Mexico.After the rallies, immigrant rights groups will join LGBTQ, African-American and women’s organizations this summer to push for the election of new leaders, Salas said, adding that they hope to see more support from Americans who aren’t immigrants.“It is really a fundamental question about what kind of a country we’re going to be,” she said. “For us, the question of immigration is a question about race, and it is also a question about real equality in this country.”Today is the Annual #MayDay March for Immigrant and Workers Rights. It has never been more important to stand with immigrants and demand our government respect the rights of all people. pic.twitter.com/hHADEu2gJT— ACLU of Wisconsin (@ACLUofWisconsin) May 1, 2018last_img

Ward 8 Dems Dont Endorse in Chairman AtLarge Race

first_imgBy James Wright, Special to the AFRO, jwright@afro.comThe chairman of the D.C. Council, and one of the at-large council members, didn’t receive an endorsement from one of the most influential political organizations in the District of Columbia.On April 21, the Ward 8 Democrats held their endorsement meeting for the positions of the District Attorney General, chairman of the D.C. Council, and the Democratic at-large seat on the council at the D.C. Vehicle for Hire Department in the ward. Ward 8 Democratic voters were eligible to cast ballots for the three positions and there were members of the D.C. Democratic State Committee members from other wards to police the process and see that it ran smoothly.Anita Bonds is running for re-election as a Democratic at-large council member. (AFRO File Photo)The voting took place from 12-2 p.m.The endorsements are for the June 19 Democratic primary. The winner of the Democratic primary for the three positions are favorites to win the Nov. 6 general election because the city is 74 percent Democratic, according to D.C. Board of Elections statistics.For a candidate to receive an endorsement from the Ward 8 Democrats, they needed to get 60 percent of the votes that were cast. In this instance, a candidate would have had to get 46 votes out of the 78 cast.D.C. Council member Anita Bonds (D-At Large) is running for re-election to a second full term. Bonds is running against Ward 8 activist Aaron Holmes, environmental leader Jeremiah Lowery and real estate professional Marcus Goodwin in the June 19 Democratic Party primary.Bonds got 33 votes, 13 short of the endorsement while Holmes got 21, Goodwin received 12 and Lowery had eight. Despite not getting the Ward 8 Democrats nod, Bonds told the AFRO she was satisfied with the result.“I am pleased that I came and participated,” she said. “I would note that one of my opponents came from this ward and I got more votes than he did.”WHO IS SHE TALKING ABOUT?Goodwin credited the leadership of the Ward 8 Democrats for having an open process. “The result was nothing profound to me but I take my hat off to the Ward 8 Democrats for giving the candidates a fair opportunity,” he said to the AFRO. Goodwin noted that the late Marion Barry, the four-term mayor and elected four times to represent the ward on the D.C. Council, would have supported Bonds and she would have gotten the endorsement outright because of his influence.During the council candidates’ forum that took place during the voting, all agreed that more affordable housing is needed in the District and the educational system is due for major improvements. They also agreed that the District should have a state-of the art hospital in its East End and not a jail, whether it is publicly or privately financed.In the chairman’s race, D.C. Council Chair Phil Mendelson came up three votes shy of winning the endorsement. However, there are three provisional ballots that need to be counted and they have the potential to earn the chairman the endorsement.Former D.C. Fiscal Policy Institute leader Ed Lazere had 20 votes to perennial candidate Calvin Gurley, the only African American in the race, who got eight. District Attorney General Karl Racine has no opponent in the Democratic primary and easily got past the 60 percent threshold.last_img

Researchers suggest rate of evolution change can explain discrepancy between molecular clocks

first_img(Phys.org) —A pair of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Australia, believe they may have found a way to solve the discrepancy problem that exists between molecular biologists and paleontologists who disagree on the likely first appearance of placental mammals. They describe their new dating approach, which they call a “morphological clock” in their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B Citation: Researchers suggest rate of evolution change can explain discrepancy between molecular clocks and fossil evidence (2014, August 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-08-evolution-discrepancy-molecular-clocks-fossil.html More information: Ancient dates or accelerated rates? Morphological clocks and the antiquity of placental mammals, Proc. R. Soc. B 22 October 2014 vol. 281 no. 1793 20141278. rspb.royalsocietypublishing.or … nt/281/1793/20141278AbstractAnalyses of a comprehensive morphological character matrix of mammals using ‘relaxed’ clock models (which simultaneously estimate topology, divergence dates and evolutionary rates), either alone or in combination with an 8.5 kb nuclear sequence dataset, retrieve implausibly ancient, Late Jurassic–Early Cretaceous estimates for the initial diversification of Placentalia (crown-group Eutheria). These dates are much older than all recent molecular and palaeontological estimates. They are recovered using two very different clock models, and regardless of whether the tree topology is freely estimated or constrained using scaffolds to match the current consensus placental phylogeny. This raises the possibility that divergence dates have been overestimated in previous analyses that have applied such clock models to morphological and total evidence datasets. Enforcing additional age constraints on selected internal divergences results in only a slight reduction of the age of Placentalia. Constraining Placentalia to less than 93.8 Ma, congruent with recent molecular estimates, does not require major changes in morphological or molecular evolutionary rates. Even constraining Placentalia to less than 66 Ma to match the ‘explosive’ palaeontological model results in only a 10- to 20-fold increase in maximum evolutionary rate for morphology, and fivefold for molecules. The large discrepancies between clock- and fossil-based estimates for divergence dates might therefore be attributable to relatively small changes in evolutionary rates through time, although other explanations (such as overly simplistic models of morphological evolution) need to be investigated. Conversely, dates inferred using relaxed clock models (especially with discrete morphological data and MRBAYES) should be treated cautiously, as relatively minor deviations in rate patterns can generate large effects on estimated divergence dates. Explore further Research team claims fossil-only study of placental mammalian evolution time frame is wrongcenter_img To date the first appearance of a something in the biological record, modern scientists have two main tools—dating fossils and using what’s known as a molecular clock, where DNA techniques are used to follow the evolution of species divergence. Problems come in when the two methods offer different results. That’s been the case with researchers attempting to date the first arrival of placental mammals. The earliest fossils suggest they showed up on the scene approximately 66 million years ago. The molecular clock approach, however, suggests it happened long before that, approximately 90 to 100 million years ago. In this new effort, the research pair suggest a way to resolve the difference (without claiming that the difference is because older fossils have just not been found.) They call their approach a morphological clock, which is based on the progression of anatomical differences that arise in a species, rather than DNA tracing. Using it, they suggest it’s possible that placental mammals first arrived as early as 160 million years ago. But they have a caveat, they suggest, that the speed at which evolutionary changes took place could have changed, which if taken into account, would bring the time frame closer to 66 million years ago. As for why a change in speed of evolution might have taken place, the team notes that it might have occurred soon after the dinosaurs went extinct—which would have opened up a whole new niche that could have been filled very quickly by the advent of placental mammals.If this new approach is to be taken seriously, it would cast doubts on the accuracy of molecular clocks in general—they’re based on the assumption that evolution occurs at a fixed rate. It could also help explain the “sudden” appearance of a wide variety of species 540 million years ago—the Cambrian explosion—which many believe led to the appearance of all modern animal groups. © 2014 Phys.org A four-day-old mouse. Credit: Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img